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CatEGWN 

DIRECTORY 



c 



5324556 
5324560 
532-6555 



Manhaton. KS 66506 




Ocio«ii22, 1997 
WiONESDAY 



ti(p. Date 'W/'Ai 
Kansas State Historical 
NeM^paper Section 
PO fao;< ;i'j8^ 
tapeM t^S 666'>1 



Society 



Va 102 No 42 




BASKBTBAa HCKET CAMPERS 
FACE TICKET TRAUMA PART TWO 

P- As many t'Lideriti picked up their bosketball uoKifi 
ticket) this week. Kime were surprised to SM three 
goiTtes hod already been punched oft. 

See SPORTS, Page 6 



INDEX 

tfltoday'i 

Briefs 

Opinion 

Diveoioni .. 



2 
...4 
..7 



MANHATTAN 
T WN'CHNTE 



THE lO-YEAR CELEBRATION BEGINS 
AT MANHAnAN TOWN CENTER 

^ Maflhollon Town Ctnltril lOifi anniversary kicks oH 
tonight with an invitation-only Monholton Cti amber at 
Commerce Business After Hours See Thursday's Collegian 
lor extended cosrerage of the events and history 




HIGH 54 

LOW 31 

Parity cloudy ond 
ttiot Rom ixissible 
lor the rait of li^e 
w6ek Chilly 
uvofnigdl lowv 
poiSitile 
F':»ECAit, Paui 2 



City Commission rejects Cohen-Esrey/ 5-0 



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Nnnh 'Cotiiftfwy ' 



»'CiTY Commission NIXES 

plans for low-income housing 
development in Northview. 

MVID MIIMNKS 

vil\ L-tliki> 

Tfiv Vianhatluf) City (.'ommission 
rejected Cohen- F;!.rcy's Planned Unit 
Development unncxitlion proposal Tor the 
Northview neighborhood ii] a 5-0 vote 
Tuesday nijiht 

Members of the Northview neighbor- 
hood's C'ili/cns for Stable Neighborhoods 
and iither euneerned community members 
«cre present lot the dec rs ion Traey Taylor, 
pres I lien I o (■ C ohen - 1; s rev. ateompa n 1 ed by 
his stall of prot'esMonals and legal counsel, 
alM) attended the meeting to heat the com- 



mission s decision. 

Karen Havis, Manhattan's director ol 
community development, presented the 
commission vv iih 
the proposal for the 
annexation. Alkr 
no queslHins were 
posed by the com- 
missioners, the 
lloor was opened to 
public comment. 

People on both 
sides of the contro- 
versy were given 
opportunity to 
rehash the issues 
and make Cmal 
comments. 

Concerned residents reminded the 
commission that their biggest ciwccm was 



Cort the city afford to 
go along wilh a 
rjevelofinvent like this? 
I (ust don't think we're 
ready for this /et 

• Roger Rwlx 

Cit^ COrtimiiSiOiierobout 

the woler probterni 

associated wiifi the 

development 



the lack of adequate drainage in that area, 
and that the new development would 
aggravate the problem 

( ohcn-hsrey stood by its claims thai a 
greater drainage problem would not be cte- 
aied and pointed out that Manhattan city 
siafl'had already approved the viability of 
the new de^clopment. 

After public comment. Commissioner 
Karen MeCulloh moved to deny the annex- 
ation of Cohcn-tsrey's development 
Commissioner Steve Halt seconded Ihc 
motion. With that, the eommissioners gave 
their viev*s on the proposal. 

Ctunmissioner Roger Reit/ commend- 
ed Cohen- hs rev lor its prolessionalism and 
organi/alion. tlowever. Rcit/ posed a ques- 
tion to ihe commissioners 

See DECISION, Page 8 




IVAN KOUt/Colltgiari 

ANDY KAZAR, AAonhaltan retident. Iiitens to the debate about the Cohen-Esrey 
development projecl. 



Plans are afoot to increase seating at KSU Stadium. 

PRiviLhXiE Fke Committee gave you more time to study the plans and options. 

Start beefing up. There is a test — you're voting on it in November. 

GROWING PAINS 



STORIES BY TRAVIS D. LENKNER 



Proposed KSU Stadium expansion 




7500 UuJtMtHI) 

* Plan ^ hoi (Kpdvnl wohng in ifcliqfih 2i27. 
Mchoh G. porli ol iMcfwrti A and H and 
gumanltn ol Inil 4.000 itudxil woli 

* nun 2 hot lKid*«^l MCt*!!^ 1^ wclKmk 2477. 
■Khont A. B C H. I J andguoxintHi Etlnil 
10000 1 



and oddihoniil ttatH^ odd*) to *m Ivil iid> 
• En*r«nc04. coftcnKint oivl fllftooAt wi bo 



D 


Eidlltng ifodium 






^ 


E«i&Hng upper tieck 






■ 


Banc fljtpanitoh ^ndiir 


pkihi 1 ond 2 


■ 


Furthv «Mponiion und« 


f plon 2 


only 


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N«w »«ilboclt wchon 


m pkini 


1 and 2 



Archrlcci'i r«rtd«ring oi rh« pfopoivd 
rvmodalmg of vnlrorKBt. c:onc«iiion& and 
lentroofni on fhe weii iid» The remode^tfvg 
IS 4rKiud«d m both «iiponiwn plom 



Soufct Otpahnwit of tnlwfcollvgiolt Ath(Mic» 



ANMttW MAtONIAK/CalUgiafi 



Student leaders 'opinions on expansion 
mixed on whether to create privilege fee 



Student Dody President Tim Kiemann has 
heard the prop*isals 
lie knows abimi Ihe plans of the 
Dcpartmcnl ol Inlereollegialc 

Athletics to expand KSU Stadium He 
knows the creation of more student 
seating in the stadium hinges on the 
creation of a privilege fee for stadium 
expansion. 

He said he wishes thci« was anoth- 
er way. 

"Overall, I would like to sec a Vadi- 
um expansion," Ricmann said. "But 1 
think it s unfortunate that the entire slu- 

dcnl population has to pay moni^ ti> 

itubsidi/c the benefits received by » 
small part of Ihc population." 

Increases m ticket prices could not he used to 



help I 
ticket 
cnue 



^ The editorial 

The editorial boord 
suggests iiudaflit use 
ihe lime provided to 
stmiy the ptDpotol 
snd eiKOMogii the 
powers ihof be to 
make voting ureas 
availobie to everyone 
Me PO0t 4. 



inancc the cxpansnin's 15-year fHind. because 
sales cannot be counted as dependable rev- 
I r ticket-price increases can't fund the cxpan- 
Mon. private com rihui ions would be 
another aliernaiivc. Ricmann said. 

"Private contributions arc always the 
No 1 answer in my mind I think it would 
be itto bad thai 20,000 students would have 
to pay a privilege fee so thai *.IK)0 or 
l(),OtW could gel fooiball tickets," he said, 
Aaron Truax. velerinary medicine 
student senator and Privilege Kee 
Committee vice chair also questions the 
creation of a fee. Financial conMniints on 
students because of the fee increase 
should be considered, he said. 

See SOA, Page 8 



Creation of privilege fee 
for stadium expansion 
to be voted on by students 



KSU Stadium wilt be growing. 
Next month, students will 
decide whether they want to 
fund part of the project through 
the creation ol a new privilege fee. 

Max Unck, director of Ihc 

Department ol' Intcrcol- 

legiatc Athletics, said pub- 
lic demand tor quality seals 
is the motivation tor the 
expansion proposal, which 
could add us many as 
IIMHK) seats to the stadium 

The athletic department 
has proposed a stadium 
expansion privilege tee to 
fund the project Under its 
proposal, students would 
pay a per-eredit-hour fee to finance 
about one-third of the expansion 

The proposed addition to the stadi- 
um, uhieh would he complete lor the 
I4W fiMitball season, ts centered around 
two proposals I loth involve the creation 
of a privilege Ice until Ihe 15-year 
expansion btind is paid ofl' Unck esli- 
mated the final total lor the project to be 
between SID million and SI 1 million 

For a SI pcr-eredit-hour fee, students 
would be guaranteed lll,tKKt permanent 
student seats instead of the current 
7.5(H)-seat guarantee, lor 50 cents per 
credit hour, the athletic department 
would reserve '»,()< Id student seats. 

Under both proposals, ticket prices 
for students wnuld he frown tor four 
years Also, a special section wxjuld be 
created at football and basketball games 
for receni graduates K-Siaic alumni 
could purchase season tickets at fib per- 
cent of Ihe public rate for two years after 
graduation. 

Regardless of whether students 
vote fiir expansion, some sort of 
addition to the stadium will take 
place, Unck said The upper deck 
on the stadium's east side v^ill be 
enlarged to add more general pub- 
tic seating and restrimnts Concession 
facilities, built in 1%2. will be remod 
eled, and the IX'v Nelson Press Box 
will be expanded to add more 



*■ Qukkfort 

Ihe Departnwnl o( 
Imercoiegioie AthMcs 
IS required to reserve 
7,SM sfudenf! leah 
However, ?4'1 *••• 
sold to students m 
lW7ond«,MI 
were toU lo ilulanh 
inim 



luxury suites and club seating, Unck 
said 

A student body referendum next 
month will put the decision of whether 
to create a fee to a campuswide vole 
Urtek said he recogm/es the concern 

that students who don't attend 

football games wiuilU still W 
paying for stadium expansion 
under the athletic dep;irtmeni 
prop*>sals Ihmever. he said. 
the football program benefits 
the university :is a whole, 
which makes a privilege Ice 
practical 

■'There's value to the 
university in having a quality 

athletic program It alTccts 

the spinl and nu)rale ol the univ crsiiy." 
Urick said. "It alsti builds pnde and high 
self- esteem. Il's an aetivitv that cuts 
across all ages, classes and curriculum 
probably more than any single activ iiy at 
the university," 

He said some students' concerns 
abtiut paying for the siaduim w hen they 
don't use it can he likened to olhct situ- 
ations, such as the privilege fee for 
Lafcnc Health Center or school district 
bond issues 

"It's not unlike a community where 
s«}meone is against vniiiig lor higher 
taxes lor a sehrwl system because they 
have no childa>n in the sehiHtls." Unck 
"The quality of the university as a 

See SIATS, Poge 8 



said. 



What do the players Involved have to say? 



"Overall, I would 

like to see a tiodi 

Uffi expaniiofl, but I 

think it's unlortu- 

nala that the entire 

student popubfiorv 

has to poy money 

to wbfidize liw 

betwfitt received by a sfnall port ot 

the popublton ' 

iifii KwiMfW/ inJOMnt booy 




"If iw impose this 
fee. we're not reof 
ly confidertng ihoie 
people who are 
more worried oboul 
ol^ding education 
itwn getting a (oo»- 
boll ticket ' 



Aoron Trueui, Hvibgt Fm 

CommittM vice chair 




'A vote yes gives 
the students a defi- 
nite priority over 
the general pubk 
(or 2,500 mofe 
seoti now ond in 
the future A vote 
no putt therr in 
direct coffipetition with one another.' 

Mox Unckf Dsportnwit of 
liiMfCMM^Ota AnUomi afr#cfae 




"Wt like a buikiing 
for the Khoolof 

onhilocture. Not 
everyone i* inta 
orcfHfOCTvrei 
but if 'i kind of a 
leom-type of thing. 
We all need to 
holp eofh odtor 
out,- 
lill Snyiler, 

rOOlDOil COOCh 




Qualified 
admissions 
remains on 
schedule 



AStOCIATID PIISS 

IUPLK.A A plan rcqumng Kansas 
high school students lo take specific 
L'ourscs and nieei academic requtrBments 
to attend the mx Kansas Koard of Regents 
universities is on schedule, a legislative 
cnnimiltce was told. 

The Legislative bdueational 
Planning (ommittee a joint oversight 
contmittee for higher education was 
updated Tuesday on the status ot the 
qualttled-admisstons program enacted 
by lawmakers m I'Wd 

Steve Jordan, lioard of Regents 
executive director, said the qualifkHl- 
admissmns program would start on 
sehedulc for ihe Tall semester in 2tHll 
and that tt wouldn't reduce the numk-r 
of iliose attending regents universities 

"We're going to return 
more students in college. 
This isn't about keeping 
kids out of college This is 
about keeping kids in col- 
lege," Jordan said 

There are no admission 
requirements for Kansas 
residents to attend any 
regents university now, 
other than to be a high 
schtHtl graduate 

Under the qualified- 
admissions program, high 
schtHtl students in a pre- 
college curriculum will 
have to graduate with a 2.0 average, or 
have an Amcrie.in Coflege Testing score 
of ui least 21. or rank in the top one- 
third tif their graduating class 

Lteyond ihat, students wanting to 
attend any regents universiiy must com- 
plete lour ycani of Imglish, three years 
each of natural science, math and social 
Hiences and twc year of computer tech- 
nology 

Jordan said his olViee has been work- 
ing with the slate Hoard of l-ducaiion, 
which oversees public sehiHils and the 
community colleges, to make sure the 
program is up aiuj running fay 2l)UI 

I'ur instance, he said 50^ high sehixil 
educators this year attended eight work- 
shops dealing \sith qualified admis- 
sions 

lie said all high sehimls arc capable 
of offering the courses required under 
the qualified-admissions program, but 
in some cases it will mean itiey will have 
to change some ot the courses tslTered 

"It is a question of whether they have 
the right mix," Jordun said. "Hut ihc 
time will allow the high schools to shift 
resources " 

Jordan said 7K pcreent of Kans^is 
high schtH^I graduates go on to sonrie 
type of jH>st -secondary education 
universities, community colleges or 
technical schools Me said that figure 
was fih |vervent a decade ago. 

He said there are about KO,(KKI stu- 
dents enrolled in the six regents univer- 
sities K -State, Ihe University of 
Kansas, Wichita State University. 
Rmporia State University, Pittsburii 
State Universiiy and Fort Hays State 
Univcmily, 



(•(• 

Mire gang to retain 
more students m 
college Dvis lyi i about 
keeping kids out ol 
college This ii oliout 
keeping Itidi m college 

• Stovt Jordan 

Eloard of Hegents 
executive director 



DEADLINES 

TO PUCE AN ITEM 

in the Daily Plannei, 

itopby K*diie )16 

ond Bll out a form 

0* »mail it to 

by 1 1 am, two cJoyi 
' it fi to run 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



NiAMionafDntx 
MLtrOIT 



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19 9 7 



NEWSrewind 

Nbwt f «wrnd co'Ik's 'h« lop tampui, hail, tlcif*, notemif and worid tmn horn At pott 48 hourt Stmh ora codpcW 
from WTr» and )tof raporti 



Gang members suspects in attack, 
beoting in south central Kansas 

aURRTON, Kan - Police m this south ceotrol 
Kansas town are soaking members of orv allegeci youth 
gong that; in recent days, has been linked to tfie beat- 
irtg of a girl and an attack on a handicapped man 

Thfee youngsters wefe being sought Monday in the 
altock on the girl, Burrion Police Chief Shaun Corcoran 
said. 

Thai woi on the heeti of another tncirfeni in which 
four other alleged gang members — three fuveniles 
and 1 8year-old Michael Thompson - were arrested 
on suspicion ol kidnoppmg, battery and assault 

Tf>e h>ur were orresled ah«r a 1 9-y«atolcl disaL>led 
man told ouiliorities he was threatened and wxually 
assaulted by them lost Thursday 

Cofcoron soid the 19-year-old man hod been 'ini- 
tfoled" into the group against his wishes 

When the gong members asked the man to jotn the 
group, he declined Corcoran said the gang members 
tied up the victim, h«ld o butcher kntfe to his ihtoal ond 
threatened to kill him if he didn't tel them sodomize 
him 

In the other incident, Corcoran said ihe alleged 
female victim was in tfte custody ol the Deportment of 
Soctol and Rehabilitation Services and was attending 
school in Burrton 

He said the girl didn't wont to become o gang 
member either and hef ossoult took place (ail Frtdoy 

Campus shooting leaves 1 dead 
in apparent drug deal gone bad 

NASHVILLE, Tenn — Gunfire erupted dunng a 
drug deal in a residence hall room at Tennessee State 
University, killing one person Ofld seriously wounding 
or>olher who was apparently trying to rob the others 

AAeIro Police Homicide Detective E J Bernard soid 
the shootings hoppened Monday evening at Boyd Hall 
on the TSU campus 

Police believe live people, ot least one a TSU stu- 
dent, were present in the sixth-Roor room when one ol 
them attempted to rob others of money or drugs, 
Bernard sord 

One parti<ipant was shot in the head and died, the 
other, believed to tw the robber himsell, was wounded 
in the atxiomen and was in loir condition this morning 
ofler surgery at Vanderbilt Untveisity Medical Center 



The violence come on the first i^ of o com- 
pus wide "cfime-lree week" at Tennessee Slote 

University oHiciols hod planned to use the week to 
promote safety on com pus Insteod, they opened o 
building to provide oll-nighi counseling to students 
troubled by the ihootirtg. 

Students become ill after lunch 
at Olathe elementary schools 

OLATHE, Kan - About 125 elementary school 
students ol different schools became ill with flu-like 
symptoms offer o lunch ol burritos that come from o 
pockaged food distribufor 

The district reported Monday thot students com 
ploirted ol obdommoi poin and some vomited after eat- 
ing the burritos Students were sent to o hospital during 
school hours, officiols soid, but some vrere sent home 
Others were treated and remoined m school 

The illnesses were reported at 2 ) o( the diUricl's 25 
elementary schools 

Woman ordered to give computer 
to man occused of roping her 

PONTIAC, Mich - A womon who soid she wos 
sexually ossoulled by o mon she n«l through on or^ime 
chat room hoi been ordered lo turn over her computer 
lor examination try the defendant's lowyer 

Circuit Judge Alice Gilbert issued the order Oct 8 
after the cJefendoni said another computer user told 
him the woman had bragged online - in o chol room 
colled "Man Holers" - about moktng up the story 

The woman was also ordered to reveol her pass- 
word and online olioses 

Seon A Crockett, 26, is occused of pulling a knife 
and ottocking ihie woman Feb 28 after they went out 
on dote 

Prosecutors said they will appeol the ruling Tftey 
comploined thai there would be no way to limit the 
defense attorney's inspection of the woman's computer 
files 

Those liles might contain personal inlor motion or 
financial records, prosecutors said They also soid 
tnformotton might be odded or deleted hom the com- 
puter s memory 

"In my view, turning over somebody's computer 
these days is the some os osking to go through their 
diory or moil," prosecutor John Pietrofeso said 



DAILYplanner 

Jht Daily Phnnei ij ihe ioKegion i compui buNvtin boord 
service ItefTii m the ptannw can be pubiiih^ up *P tht^t 
times itwrs might no' oppeor becouie ot jpoce comlraifiH 
bur or* guoranMd lo oppeor on iht day ol the ocrtnily h 
ploct on item, iiop by Kedfie ' 1 6 and hW out a form or 
e-mail ii tocallegnSkiu eduby 11 am iwo thyt b»^# i' <t 

to run 

* /MMt Student Servka* will sponsor brown bog lurtch 
81 for adult nonlrodiiional students from 1 1 o m to I 

p in kxtoy in Union Skiieroom 1 

* Student HmMs Advieery CoifNnlltM will inect at 
4 15pm lodoy <n lalgne 231 Everyone <i wekome to 
oitend 

* KSU AJUde will ffl»el oi 7 p m every Wonikiy. 
Wadnesdoy and Fndoy Itiis iei(ies1«r >n Aheo'n 301 
Beginners can start at any rime 

* H)M will meet ot 30 lonighl m Jovo in Aggieville 

t The Groduot* Schttol hos scheduled ihe hnol oral 
(ietense of th« (kxiorol dissertation of Cesar Guvde lor 
! 30 p m Thursdoy m Wolers 329 

* Alpha Phi Onwga nationol service frolernily wiU meet 
at 6 p m Thursdoy in Union 203 

^ vfv#Ki AdyocfltinQ tiM Moture MoiwQefiMiit ot 
Akohol will meer ot 6 p m THuriday ip Union 206 

* Ordaf of Omega Greek leadership honorary will 
meet at 6 p m Tiivrsdoy ol ihe Alpha Xi Delto sonority 
house 

* The Amwican Xod Craw will hove a wrap-up meeitng 
loi ihe loll btood dri«« or 7 p m Thursdoy m Union TOM 

* Mortar ioard will oword two S2D0 scholoishipt to 
[vniors rtiis loll Applications, now ovoiloble in itie Office 
ol Studeni Activities ond Services on the ground floor ot 
the K Stole Siudent Union, o'e due by 5 p m Oct 27 

* Sludwit CdiiMr ReMaRh Award* ol 1500 ore 
available (□' undergroduote students in a hedth^elated 
degree Applicolions O'e now availoble m Ackeri 1 1 3 
and ore due by Dec S 



POUCEbloHer 

Xeporti uie rolfi/i diiecrfy from rhe KSioie and Ritay County po/iee 
deportments' thily logi Wedonoi 'in whe»l hcki or minor froftc 
violahoni because o/ ipoce constraints 

KSTATE 

MONDAY, OaOUR 20 

• At 9 29 pm , o bicycle wos taken frofrt o 
Haymaker Holl bicycle rock A tfioft report wos filed 



RILEYcouNTY 

MONDAY, OaOUR 30 

• At 6:24 p m , o crtminol damage to property 
report wos filed becouse of broken mirrors at 1715 
Humboldt St Loss was $1,300 

* At 1113 p m., aggravated battery and battery 
reports w«re filed ol 8 1 6 Sunset Ave 



TUiSOAY, OaOUR 21 

• At 9:04 a.m., William Clemeni vyoi arrested on a 
Riley County warrant for Eoilure to appear. Bond woi 
set at $500 

• At 9: 1 9 am, the theft of five ririgj ond a watch 
was reported at 711 Allison Ave. Loss was $275. 



^S(lli!]ST 



imifisiiii 




54' 

31° 



ToiWEr 

Portly cteudy 

and cooJ wtth 

a southeast 

wind ol 
5 to lOmph. 



IONS 

Sometimei rhe Coll»gian molei o muloke. Il a mistake occurs, contqcl Jill 
Story FTKinaging editor, by phone 1532-0536), by e-moti 
c^kffi9iiu tdu Ot by Slopping by ih« Collegian at Kedzie 11 A 



To round out 
iha week, highi 

in the mid%SOt 
with rain likely. 



•YPHONE 

NtWStOOM 

932-65M 

AiMnis*4G 
U2-«SM 

ClASSfKOi 

932-«5$5 

•Yf-MAH. 

■TMAH. 

Kai4sa,s Staie 

COUEOAN 

Ktna 1 16 
Kansas StATf 

Manhaiian, KS 
66506 

WPftSON 

Tt«C0UEOUW 

tCWSIOOMI^IN 

KEDZf 116 

(AciossnoM 

m K-Sw 
Stuoent Uncn) 



Ttw Rofiiat State CflllglBil lUSPS i?*? I 0?0|. a in.'Je^il newspoper ni Konsos Stole University i; published by Sludinl Publication: be . Ked^ie 103 A^r^hatton, Kon 66506 The CoilegiCHi is pubkshnd weekdays during the school year and Nvice a week ihrou^h the summet 
.PecKidicol postage <* poid oi f.V]rhoilon. tan 66502 PCiSfMASJiR Send address chonges to Kansas Slote CoHegian, diQiAigitdi^, KerfSe 103, Montwflon, tCon. 66506-7167 A Kansas Swf C>\fi<Mi. IW^ 



You missed the ^aine to work the coriceeelon stand. 

You spent your Saturday cleaning the highway. 

You studied hard to make that honorary. 

Get Recognizedl 

More than 250 organizations make K-Stat© ^reat. 
Make sure your group is in the 1998 Royal Purpla 




These organizations are scheduled 
to have their pictures taken on 

Thursday, October 23 



€>\00 p.m. - Marlatt Governing 3oard 

6:40 p.m. - Alpha Chi 5igma 

7:40 p.m. - American Institute of Chemical Engineering 



Pictures will be taketi in McCaiti 324. 
The Koya! Purple yearbook C3n be purchased at this time for $24.95. 



Schedule an appointment for your organization in 103 Kcdzic for $15. 
You can also get a sound byte for the CD-ROM supplement for $5. 



101 Krdm- 1^411 

(7H«i) ^.12-6^=>7,rptokni.i'dii 
hitp:// www.ipub.ktu.edu/rp/ 



'purple 



F 




iHi ornciAL outBi to n stati rootiAii witKiMai in ihi iittii »*nt 

Gameday Manhattan is the AlU 

FoothaU Edition of the Collegian. 

Published on Home^game 

Saturdays. 

Follow the Cats all the way to their 

FIFTH STRAIGHT BOWL. 

Pick up your copy at 



• Local Bars & Restaurants 

• Hotels 

• K-State Student Union 

• K-Rock live remote at the game 

• Strecker Gallery 

• Wholesale Beauty 

• Little Caesars 

• Flint Hills Computers 

• A Cut Above 

• Purple Rg 



• Breadeaux Pizza 

• Precision Auto 

• Rose Muffler 

• Baskln Robbins 

• Wildcat Creek 

• University Commons 

• Otto's Bar-B-Q 

• Staten Auto 

• Its Greek to Me 

• Flint Hills RV 



2 GAMIPAYS lETT 
Nov. 8 |amM*Nov.1$ Colorado^ 



L 



WIDNESDAY, OCTOBIK 22, 1997 



KANSAS STATE COUEOrAN 



Blood donation site 
to open in January 



^ Kansas blood 

SERVICES TO offer donors a different 

environment 



USUI NACHIIAI 

K-Statc stuJcnii^ unil Manhallan a-sidcnts Mill soon have 

ihc opporiunii) Id gnt hkwil in a dillbrcni way, and in a dir- 
Icn-'ni environ men. t ihan hcliirt 

Kansas HlotHt St'rvrcts. hascd in loptka, is opciiingj a silc 
in January ai I Ith and Mtms streets m Ag^iev ille. Adriannc 
f'.vans, director of rccruitmenl and coinmuniiy relations fur 
Kansas BIwHt SeiMces, said the) v.i\i otTer an environment 
not available at other hlixxl'dnnation center?; 

Lvans said donors will be able to sit in lar^e. eoinlorlablc 
lounge ehairs and watch lelvv ision with headphones. 

"We're making it as easy as possible tor people lo gi\e the 
gift of lite." (.vans said 

The biggest dillerence. I- vans said, was the site will he an 
uuiomated collection site Ai each station, a mini -cent rifugc 
will piimp out the blood and automatically scparale lis com- 
poncnls. Whatever components the center is nol collecting that 
day are put back tmo the donor atony wmIi a saline solution to 
make up tor die loss in v olume 

"It's better for I he donor, because there won't be any loss m 
volume," [.vans said "That's what usually causes the rvaelions 
people have atk*r giv ing blwHl " 



Kvans said the pn>cess lakes a little longer ihiin w ithoui ihe 
e em n luge, but an advantage is it uses a smaller needle 

To accomiiu>dale parents, there are plans lor an enclosed 
play center lor children al the site Ihe center will also have 
longer hours, keeping the sile open until K p nt. at lea.st ihree 
days a week. 

Kansas (Hood Serviees already 
has one site in Topeka. one in 
Lawrence and wd I be opening anoth- 
er in Topeka on Monday. 

Kvans said there were Iww rea- 
sons Kansas lUwid Serv lees decided 
to open a siie in Manhattan Ihe cen- 
ter serves II) counties in Kansas, but 
one ol the areas il didn't serve was 
Manhattan Also, hvans said ihe I'aet 
that Manhattan is a college town 
helps 

"Kids arc really good abi)ul giv- 
ing bliHid." ['.vans said. "College kids 
understand it's a civic duty Al^, 
we're looking lor healthy people, and 
I can pretty much count on college 
students being healthy" 

I'vans said she didn't think the opening of Kansas Blood 
Services would cause any competition with other bliHtd col- 
lection sites in Manhattan 

"There's a Red t ross in 1 awrence. and we have one in 
Lawrence." I vans said. "Wre've never had a problem there." 



<•(• 

Wi'ri moltiiK) It 01 Miy 
as possible bi people lo 
giw the gift ol tile 

• AdrianiM Evoni 

diretfor o( [Kfuihrwnl 

and communir^ lelatxyii 

(or Kansa) Slood 

Services 

i^^ 



STD educators present 
awareness tips to BSU 



Kiitv lorDsroN 

Black Student Inion was reminded about sexual responsi- 
bility from K-State students ai its Tuesday night meeting 

(Representatives from ST [3, II IV AIDS Peer l.ducators 
urged members to protect their partners as well as themn-lves 
concerning sexual intercourse. They also identified various 

campus resources that prt)- 
vide testing for sexually 
transmitted diseases 

"If you don't protect your- 
self, you can infect each other 
with seiualiy transmitted dis- 
eases, possibly multiple 
titnes," said James Lehman, 
SUA PL educator "Lifty percent orcolle^ie siudetUs lie .ibout 
their sexual history, so you need lo be leally careful and trust 
the person you are with" 



f^LACK 



O 



TUDENT 



NION 



1 chman also said sexually transmitted diseases, including 
lll\^ don't discriminate against any ethnic group. 

"Everyone should be concerned for their indiv idual safety 
This isn't a racial issue," Lehman said "Il doesn't care what 
color you arc or where you come from." 

Some BSLI members said there was a need for more awan:- 
ness in I heir communities 

"Iven through increased education and awarertess, 
African- Americans are the only group nol declining in the 
numbers of people infected with HIV?' Irysha Walker, BSK 
member, said "We're not doing our job as African- 
Americans" 

Jastin Mcdowan. USl' vice president, said this program 
was a gjwnl or»e to present lo [IS I members 

"1 his shows that a lot of pei^le need to protect themselves 
and learn «hat to do Prescnialuins tike then* help USIJ mem- 
hcrs gel out jnd active in USLI and hear giHMj information at 
Ihe siime time," he said. 




"IF HAVING A 

MONEY MANAGER 

WORKS FOR THE 

WEALTHY, IT WILL 

WORK FOR ME'.' 

Voij doii't havt to be watthv to haw 

a moiiev' manager Juit smart At 

Commerce Bank, you have persoiiui 

access to professional money 

majiagement, Qjininert* Portfolio 

.Manager offers six tlynanitc 

inveitmeni siraiegles. As the market 

chai:ij(es, w inonttor and change 

\our investtneiiLs to stay on track for 

the long run It's tnvestiijj( made 

sli)i()le. Call luo Wllllains today at 

58'?-l2.^t for mott infonnaiitin. 

"FOR MY MONEY 
IT'S COMMERCE" 



I NVESTMENT MANAGEMENT CROUP 

^ Commerce Bank 



'Mnm. 





Medi 
disci 

Coverage 
by rnec 

MUMUMfKI 

The Society of 
I'rolessional Journalists 
sptmsored a diversity forum 
Tuesday night to discuss 
coverage of multictillural 
events on campus. 

The discussion was led 
by a panel of rcpreseni.i- 
tivcs from the Collegi.in. 
KSDH-LM ^\ 4. KKSt;- 
AM 5Ktt and the Roval 
Purple. 

The general topics of 
discussion between the pan- 
elists and Ihe audience cen- 
tered around the need lot 
more media coverage ol 
muhieultural events on the 
k-Staie campus Audience 
members suggesicd ways to 
increase communic.it ion 
between student organiza- 
tions and campus media 
outlets 

Many members ol the 
audience said they fch their 
organizations were not 
receiving consistent cover- 
age m the Collegian and 
Rwal Purple and on the 
campus r^dio stations 

"Last year, the ItSfi Me 
Greet activity at ihe beginning 
school year got great covcragi 
Collegian, but ihis year we 
received any coverage at al 
though the event had grown." 
McLemore. president of Black 
Union, said. 

Audience members also e\ 
concern about some laitgu 
Collegian anicles that was con 
offensive by some people 

The panelists noted the re 
of the audience concern 
explained the measures being i 


10/ audience 
iss diversity 

? of inulticultural events 
lid addressed at forum 


:^* 


mr coonM/C(>ii»s«i'> 

RAMIIA MANNING, lenior m ino« commumcotioni, pojes a question fo Scott lodd, edi 
lor in chief ol ihe K Stole Collegrnr, in o forum iponsofed by the Society ol Piofeiiionol 
journaliili on Tuesday night in the K Stote Student Unton Repfetentativei from KKSUAM 
560, KSDB-FM 9 1 9, the Collegian and the Royol Purple were on hand to diKuis diversity 
itsues in campus media 

cltminate anv olTcnsoe language or how her stalf would bencfil from more 

teimmology in campus covetage story ideas from students 

el .iiid "We are niomioriiig the content of "t'copte can contact us with story 

of the our published stones more Ihan we ideas through e-mail, phone calls, mail 

in the Used to We ate alstt making an cITort or jusl slopping by uuroOke We have 

hardly lo educate our writers abtnil what Ian- an open-diwr policy and encourage 

. even guagc is appiopiiaie in these student input." Kunt/ satd. 

Colette inaances," s.iid Scott I ,tdd ( ollcgian Hr.uuli llcrtig, president ofSPJ and 

student editor in chief and senior m print tour- sophomore in prini journalism, closed 

luil 1 sin t he meet i ng by 1 n fu rm ing 1 he aud 1 ence 
pressed l.add also said the ( ollegian staff that another diversity forum is in the 
ige in has bceiHssued a sty lebook addendum works 
sideied that includes mcthmls to avoid biased llertiu also said SPJ welcomes any 

I.ingiiagc mpm people might have on ways to 
evjucc IJ K mil/, editor m chief of ihe increase communication bet ween mul- 
1 and Roval I'lirpic anil senior in hotel and ticultural organi/aiions and campus 
aken lo restaurant management, evpluined media oullct<». 



DON'T LET IT 
PASS YOU BY. 



Minimum inwstment tiyooo 




This is the last week to get your 
picture in the 1998 Royal Purple! 

Portrait pictures are FREE for all students! 

MAKE-UP 



PORTRAIT PICTURES 

at Blaker Studio Royal 
1019A Poyntz Ave. 

THURSDAY, OCT. li 
9 A.M-7 P.M. 



9Make-up portrait pictures will be taken 

Monday, Oct. 20 - Thursday Oct. 23 at Blaker Studio Royal. 

#Fratcrnity and sorority members who wish to be pictured with their 

respective houses need to bring clothing consistent with the rest of their house. 

ANYONE CAN HAVE THEIR 
PICTURE TAKEN AT THIS TIME. 



The prut' ot'thc 

I<.<»y.il Purple YiMrhivok iv 524.''^. 

(tiutait lis .It: Ki'ii?ti- H.)ll Idl. S.^2-6.S57 

http://www.spub.ksu.edu/rp/, rp(rt'kvu.cdii 




TU D to 
ROVAL 





KANSAS STATE COllEGIAN 



OflMON EOfrOS 

HAMMmmo 

MTOP) W)037?«wtdly 

4 ^H^^^^^ 




WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1997 



OURview 

Our Vi*w, an edtional 
selecied and debaleb 
by rh« editorial boord, 
i] written after a 
majotily opinion ii 
(ofm«t The editorial 
boord conjitts ol 
Cdlegion edilexi and 
other itoff memberi 
Out View is iKe 
Cdlegiort') ofkial 
opinion 



Stadium expansion vote should represent opinion of all students 



OrK* of the bigjCiii issues facing 
K-Siate is the "pnvilege" fees 
siudcnis pay every scmedcr. 
This year, students are payirtg 
S502 in fees lo support campus services like 
Lafette Health Center, the Chester E Peters 
Recreation Complex, the Depanment of 
Intercollegiate Athletics and the K -State 
Studcnl Unitw. 

Privilege fees could increase from that num- 
bcr next year, however. A referendum vote next 
month will determine (he opinion of the student 
bcNJy concerning the creation of a privilege fee 
that will fund nearly one-thirxi of the expansion 
of KSU Stadium, a multi-million dollar project. 



ITie creation of a pfi\'ilege fee involves 
every student at K- Stale 

Annually, each full-time student could be 
paymg S 1 2 for a 1 ,50(1 increase in guaranteed 
student s^ls or $24 for a 2,5(M) increase in 
guantntccd student scats, depending on which 
option, if any, is approved by the student body 

The plan is to base the referendum vote in 
the Union, bul will that represent the true opin- 
ion of siudcnis' 

If the Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics wani.s to gather the opinion of the 
entire student body, polling shouldn"! be 
rcstnclcd to the Union 

There are i^udcnls at K-Stale who will not 



be able to go to the Union to vole on this issue, 
but docs that make Iheir opinions less impor- 
tant'.' 

Every student deserves a chance to vote. 
This includes students in the school of veteri- 
nary medicine and students vvho Itve in the kh- 
idcnce halls and iardine Terrace ApartmenLs. 
These students should mt be forced lu go to the 
Union to vote. 

The relcrendum should represent a cam- 
puswidc election The referendum should come 
to them, not vice versa. 

The charKC to vole should noi be the only 
iMue the athletic depart meni should consider 
when conducting the referendum, 



l-ducation is vital 

Students should be able lo go into the voting 
booth and make an informed decision, and the 
responsibility of educating students falls 
squarely on the shoulders of (he athletic depart- 
ment. 

If il wanis more student money, it should 
educate every student on ihis campu.s. And noi 
jusi students who reside in living of^ni/aiions 

every studcnl has a right to know what could 
happen to their fees 

If the athletic department can spend SIO 
million lo expand the stadium, can't il i^-nd a 
few extra dollars to get the true opinion of the 
student body'.' 



EDboard 

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IHIOI 

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Fee$ give campus the shaft 

Let's dis the status quo and reinvent student fees in a hip-hop context, baby 




•HI KKAAl/Coitoglon 



There's a scene in the movie "Shaft" in which John Shaft 
throws one of arch-enemy Bumpy s hoodlums out a window- 
several stories abijve the seamy streets of old Times Square 
Calching the action in sharp, instant takes, the viewer is lit- 
erally thrown from the interior of Shaft's somewhat typical 
private investigator's office to a floating place outside the 
window where the htxxj seenis lo hover cvcr-so-briclly before falling to the 
ground 

The point in recalHng this visually brilliant scene in Kansas photograph- 
er Gordon Parks' classic film starring Richard Koundlt4e is lo make the best 
analogy possible to the grueling, absurd 
process of student fees at K-Stale, I- very year, 
the process rises from the pnmortlial sludge of 
campus boredom, takes the student fees by the 
collar, roughs 'em up (can you dig it') and 
tOKCs them out a plate-glass window 

That stunned feeling we experience at the 
end of the process is our hovering period out- 
side the window, right before we fall to our 
asphalt deaths Maybe it's not that bad, for 
some, bul perhaps there arc ways lo enliven 
our student fees while giving the campus a 
needed boost in some Icss-than-cxtraordinary 
areas. Ilcncc. a list of passible fees for your 
consideration: 

• Undcr-the-Tabte Gifts fee This fee would address the need of all uni- 
versities 19 «tTer prospective students free gifts, such as cars, clothes, 
money, drugs and women lor men. depending on ihe team) The Kansas 
press has tried for years to prove how the heavily recruited inrMudents have 
been reeeiv ing new Ford Mustangs for the past five years, htifvll lo no avail. 

It just strikes one as being somewhat unfair to lavish so much money on 
art students ai the expense of the remaining students What's next a spe- 
cial academic center just for an students'.' 

• Squirrel Planning Pee; Lung an issue near and dear to Ihis columnist's 
heart Ihis campus is long overdue in addressing the unprecedented baby 
boom of squirrels during the past three years 

This fee would provide free family planning and ptihlic housing, to be 
located in ihc Northvicw schivol districi. The lee would also pay for the con- 
struction of a 50-ftH)l bronze statue commemtirating li^ekiel P Parrel 1 Seth- 
Childs, the first squirrel to migrate west after the 1X33 walnut crop failed in 



FORTMEYER 



■Id lanifif 
con tend ff-moil 10 RuiwJi a1 



Ireland. 

The only thing preventing this from abivolute passage is the retcni elec- 
tion fraud in the Squirrel Tcamsle^^ Union, which has iteali ti serious blow 
lo squirrel credibility nationwide. 

• Vision 20/21* Pec: Little do students know the Kansas iktard of 
Regents' Vision 20/20 pii>gram ts no less than a grand urban renewal policy 
aimed at conservative Kansas college towns. Ihis tec would help to con- 
struct a colossal, floating pyramid city in Kansas, consisting of 20 million 
inhabilanis, that would replace the cilies of Manhattan. Ogdcn, Junction 
City and the Turnpike Hardee's al Malfield (irecn Occupants would be 
required to wear only Tommy llilfiger clothes and eat at shabby 
chain restaurants serving Soylent Green The entire basement level (HNH 
would be a Wal-Mart K-Slate would fill Hoors ^IHI2 through 41 2K. with the 
exception of Parking Services, which would be relocaled lo Anchorage, 
Alaska 

• The Student Governing Association and Intercollegiate Ik-partnteiit »)i 
Athletics Legal Defense Fund: Although this fee speaks for itself, il would 
require thai all recipients of this fev money would need to visit a Ituddhist 
monastery in California for a party and pretend not to know it was really a 
fund raiser They would also have to be hosts ot several televised collcc 
klat.schcs for $50,000 a person at the Marianna Kisilcr Ueach Museum ot 
Art. 

Use of this fee automatically qualifies the said beneficiary a job as 
leader of the free world or c*ntnncc to Stanford University. 

• Make -Me -Relevant Fee: This fee goes to tbtvse piwr, irrelevant campus 
organizaiiam that have no readily identifiable cause or reason loi cxisknit: 
other tlwn lo prmide members with rvsume entries and a shaky platform for 
launching attacks and publicity campaigns on what ihey perceive to tft 
important issues 

The money would help provide more interesting grounds tor Iheir attacks 
and self- important publicity events so as to amuse the rest ol us. Ibis cen- 
tury's social revolution might be over, but you can't blame these guys lor 
trying. 

• Casino Fee; In i shrewd ctection-ymr scheme, (iov. Bill (ira^es di-clares 
K-State a reservation and turns Hale Library into an Hxcalibur C asino, com- 
plete with King Arthur's pageant and a special Merlin the Magician show 
every 30 minutes from 4 to II p m. (twii-drink nunimum and .i tree magic 
wand for kids). Union Program Council promises a IWH mam-stage linc-up 
of Tom Jones, Debbie Reynolds and Isaac Hayes on a killer coineluck 

Damn right. 



Residence hall life may not be for sanitary-at-heart 

Make sure you bring ointment if you plan on living in residence halls, 

*/WilHH.i -com LIFE! 




TR AVI $ 

LENKNER 

fUW LMKNH II KMhomn 

in ftufmninm You am Mnd 
fovt «-moil' lo Trovii 01 



I'm getting state-sponsored athlete's foot, Il tingles, il 
Itches and it stings 
No, college fungus doesn't feel any different than the 
giHHl old homegrown kind. Still, it's a milestone. A ntc 
ol passage A landmark 

It's an official welcome lo dorm life. 

"Welcome, freshmen," the sign in front of my Moore Hall 
home should read. "Get ready for a year of Aingus-riddcn 
community showers, strange smells and a complete lack of 
personal space " 

That would be truth in adver- 
tising. 

Sure, residence ball life is a 
chance Id meet new people and 
e X pc ri enc e new th i ngs a nyone 
in the admissions department 
will tell you that. But it's al.so a 
chance to shower in Hip- flops, 
park miles away from anything 
on campus and brush your teeth 
over a sink with the remains of 
someone ela*'s macaroni and 
cheese 

I'aying lor the privilege of 
sacrificing pnvacy and hygiene in exchange for cheap room 
and board might be part of the "freshman experience " And 
eommunal living might help students get a feel for K-Stste's 
campus bclivrc they take advantage of off-campus housing. 

Hut no matter how thick the sugar coating, and no matter 
what the advantages, the quality of residence hall life boils 
down to one word. 

Ijathrooms. 

I moved into Moore Hall on Aug. 25. I've felt clean twice 
since Aug 25. I've been home twice since then, loo, You do 
the math. For those who haven't experienced life in a residence 
hall, let me fill in the blanks in the recruiting pitch that begins, 
"It's a really good thing to do your freshman year." 

The alarm sounds. You .silence it with the touch of the 
snoo/c button, begging for five more minutes of sleep, TWo 
minutes later, an alarm two dooR down goes off This one 
doesn't stop - its owner is at home, visiting his parents and 
sleeping in. His alarm will continue to sound for about two 
months. 

Fully awake, you stumble for the bathroom. IC like me, you 
are mule and wear corrective lenses, you will be shocked. In 
your blurred, predawn vision, you see a woman standing in the 
miikJIe of the room wearing only a pair of white pantici. 

Seconds after your scream, the undcrwcar-clad female 
speaks in a male voice "Hey," he/shc/il says, "how's it 



gomg'.'" 

You don't reply, speechless as you realize thai the near- 
naked bathroom girl of your dreams is actually a long-haired 
man shaving in tighiy-whitics 

The horror continues. 

Step into the shower, or, rather, wade into Ihe shower of 
your choice. Feel the bacteria oo/ing between your toes like 
mud on the bottom of a pond on a hot summer day It's gross, 
bul hey, that's what it feels like 

Turn on the water and wail for the inevitable loilet Hush, 
sink use, fire on the third floor or dripping pipe in 503 lo 
change the watcr-lempcralure scheme for the entire building 
The shower head will click slightly, and then all hell breaks 
loose, rhe temperature changes from hot lo cold in a heart- 
beat. 

Ever seen "Seinfeld"".' Shrinkage 

Your only protection from the elements is a flimsy, white 
shower curtain Add the draft from a few constantly open win- 
dow.s, and Ihe curtain becomes a second skin Clinging lo 
your wet, soapy frame, it blows inside the shower and sticks 
to you like glue. Now everyone else's germs aren't just 
on your feet. You shudder. 

Step oul of the shower and onto the wet, 
slippery tile floor. 

Attempt lo dry off with the hwcl that was 
sprayed with water when the curtain blew in and 
stuck to you because the wind was blowing 
because someone opened the window because 
they were hoi and needed air 

tt won't work. 

Wei and disgruntled, you trudge back to your 
room. On the way, you take your first deep 
breath of the morning. Your noslnis meet with 
the odor of the trash chute at the end of the hall. 
It reeks. 

Tlic alarm clock down Ihe hall is still going 
off. Others trudge toward the bathroom, prepar- 
ing 10 shower with your germs and preparing to 
buy discount ointmem that smells like a rest home 
to make the pain of athlete's foot go away. 

Next year. 1 vow 1 vwm'l live in a residence 
hall, t won't put myself through this trauma 
again. I'm going to stand up and fight the 
admissions representative who lells freshmen 
living olf campus is a "mistake." 

Someday, I'm going to spread the word and 
right the wrongs of freshman housing 

Someday, I'm going to find that damn alami 
clock. 




READERSwrite 

United Way thanks 

oepartments 

for generosity 

Dear Editor, 

On behalf of the K-Siatc 
Untied Way Coordinating 
Commit lee. we would like lo 
take this opportunity to thank all 
of the K -State departments that 
so willingly donated pri/es to 
the KSU United Way, "The 
ftjwcr of U" campaign 

Due to their generosiiy. the 
prize activities are helping to 
make the campaign fun while 
reporting for a very worthy 
cause Ttw names of the depart- 
mental volunteers who returned 
the majority of their depart- 
ment's envelopes by Oct 21 
were entered into a drawing for 
these prizes. 

By the same token, donttrs 
who make a contnbution and 
return their envelopes by (kt. 3 1 
will also be entered in an addi- 
tional drawing. 

The K-State Dnilcd Way 
Cooi^lnatlRg Committee 

Suzy Autcn 
Betsy CiuHe 
Bob Cave I to 
Kathleen Ci>pple 
Sharon Davics 
Vtcki Herbic 
Don Rathbone 
Lucy Simms 
PamStaalz 
Loleta Sump 
Deb Wonderiich 



.^ 



CCKa.^ 



WIDNtSPAY. OCTOBER 21, 1997 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Blues Festival to fill Forum Hall with jazz tunes 



msMu rotTMtvit 

The Purple Blues Ja// Pesti^ul, 
billing ilselfas havint! "Wucs mi deep itV 
purpk." kieLs olTm K iumght uiili some 
Miles Davis tunes. 

This year s Tcstival, in Union l-oinin 
tiall. teiiiures 



j;ucM sttktJM 
( 'hark's 
l\.•rkln^ «f 
Kansas t ity. 
Kan . an ullo 
saM.iphonisl 
who alstt 
ptaysi the llutc 
and oiher 

. wMHlwintls. 

Perkins 
has played al Ne\*' York's Ulue Nine as it 
featured sohiisl at the Wichita hfj 



The Purple Bluei iozi 
festival, feotunng 
gunt ioloisi Chorlei 
Perkins, begins ol 8 
p.m. in Forum Hall. 
Admission is Iree. 



feiival, with the Count Basic fkehesira 

and wiih sinjser Lena Home. 

IVrkins udl join four hilled acts for 
ihe t'cslival; the Ja// I. ah IJand A. ihc 
llutc septet rUite Juiee, the Concert ivai 
I nsemble and (he K- Slate Ju// Quintel. 

Among the selection highlights. 
Miles Davis' "Milestones," with a new 
iirrangemenl hy Dennis Wilson, director 
ol' ja// sUidies. will be perlbrmcd by 
Mute Juice. Another Wilson arrange- 
ment ol "Milestones," done for a l<J7(Js 
Lionel llaniptoti show, is a CJIi selec- 
tion 

Wilson said the arrangements lor 
holh (iroups are dilTicuh. He said the 
coitiplcxitv of the piece represents a 
departure for Mule Juice, a group that 
dehulcd at last yciir's I'estival. 

"fhcy have come a long way," 
Wilson said. "It's more mlelligcnt. It s a 



different group" 

tlute Juiee will also perform a jazz 
classic, "Take the A Train," with an 
arrangement by Wilson. The group's last 
selection, "Blue flute." was composed 
and arranged by Wilson and will feature 
Perkins 

Although not blues, per se, the CJF 
has selected two Latin numbers, "Latin 
Import" and "Miia Mira." 

Jena Prallc, senior in music educa- 
tion and bass player in CJf., said the 
Latin numbers were selected because 
they arc something the group dtn-sn't get 
to play of^cn 

"It has more rhythm." Pralle said "It's 
something you can't count, you have to 
feel The blues is easier for us because it's 
something ja/z groups do a lot." 

Members of the CJE. along with 
Wtlson, visited Gov, Bill Graves on Oct 



15 at the Statehousc for the annual 
prtK tarnation accompanying the K- St ate 
Ja// Festival. 

The IWH lestival, featuring the 
Count Basic Oa-hcstra for the third 
straight year, will honor I>i/7y (iillespie. 
Graves' prwlamation declares heb 14, 
1*WM Valentine's Day as Di/-/y 
(iillespie Day in Kansas. 

Wilson, who returned Tuesday from 
a (iillespie foundation fundraiser in 
New Jersey, said I i raves .said the only 
thing that could keep him from com- 
ing to the festival is the Legislature. 

Wilson leaves again Friday lor the 
Kennedy (enter concert "A (cIcbTation 
of America's Music." v^lnch will be 
broadcast at a later date on NHt . Vice 
President Al Ciorc will greet musicians 
and guests at a reception alter the con- 
cert 




Health, Fitness Tour draws crowds 

tc dcsiyn. said she liked the tour bceau-se 
(1 had events rather than just biwlhs. 

"I had a lot of fun," Perritte said. "I 
like stut) better llial you can actually get 
into instead ot'jusi shops." 

Steve l-wing, event operator, said the 
gladiator duel was a popular event 
because it was challenging. 1 (e also said 
ihc ojHTaiors had a tot to do with whether 
people panic ipalcd in that event. 

Rick Trev mo worked at the Perry Ellis 
KHiih, one of the sponsors of the tour 
The hmth had a raffle lor a SHHt gift cer- 
tificate and also gave av^ny Liplon iced 
lea loMudents 

"I here are a lot of people coming by 
because ihey want to win the drawing." 
Ta'\ I no said. 

Tocar said the Health and Fitness Tout 
travels to various universities throughout 
the school year 

"We travel froin campus to campus. 
pronuiting healihier lives among college 
students." he said. 

I Ic said there was a great turnout at K- 
Stale. and the goal of the tout was right 
on track, 

"ll's the positive turnout among stu- 
dents." Tticar said "It's great to have stu- 
dcnls i-onic out and have a giHtd lime 
vv ithoul drugs or alcohol " 



rONTA AliOWAT 

Students on campus Monday and 
"niCMtay had the oppirtunity to partici- 
pate in bosmg matches, wall climbing, 
gladiator duels and bungee events. 

The Jeep Plymouth llcallh and 
Fitness Tour made its .innual slop at K- 
State this week Ihc two-day tour was 
very successful, said John locar. director 
of special events for the tour. 

Everyone has their own ideas as to the 
best event of the tour 

Jarrod Sheldon, freshman m LTimiuul- 
ogy. said his favorite event this year was 
the boxing event, 

"I canje here last year. t<w," Sheldon 
said "You gel to beat up tw people, but 
you don't hurt them." 

Kob Mouser said he savv the btising 
event Monday when he was dnv mg by on 
his moped, so he made a special trip 
Tuesday to take pan m ihc tour 

"I've done just about everything so 
far," Mouser said. 

Other students liked the bungee chal- 
lenge Chris Hand I in, freshman m kinesi- 
ology, said he liked this event because it 
WIS challenging. 

"Plus. I won." Handlin said 

Melissa ftirritte. sophomore in graph- 



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7:00 & io:oo pm 

Saturday, October 25 
10:00 pm 



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The Courage to Compete 
A lecture presented by Marlah Burton Nelson 

Tuesday, November 4 
7:00 pm Forum Hall 

sponsored by UPC MuWculturol and the KSU Athletk; Dept. 




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For more info, call UPC at 532-6571 

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Film Passes Accepted 





KANSAS STATE COUEGIAN 



y^TS ED1T0« 
HMOHMIUi 




*A> 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2 7 



19 9 7 



Just weeks after confusion over ICAT availability for football games left students 
waiting for hours in long lines, some students were surprised to find that at the end 
of the basketball campout, their season basketball tickets were missing three games. 

TICKET TRAUMA: THE SEQUEL 




Tickets cut students' 
season by 3 games 



lOii WHin 

As many stuiii-ntK pickLtl up their 
tiiiskclhull «icds(tn licktls litis week, 
Numc were surprisei) to see thai 
three games hud already hecn 
punehed otT. 

The Nov. 2** Thanksgiving break 
game against Mcrctr and the Dee 20 
and Jan. 3 winttT break games against 
Virgrnia-tomniooweallli and 

Missouri have already been punched 
ofTthe ilekels 

Carol Adolph. athtelie lieket man- 
ager, said the three games were 
excluded beeause of last year's stu- 
dcnl outcry over (he price at the lick- 
els 

"Last year, the students com- 
plained for being charged tor games 
that ihcy couldn't go to," she said. 
"The three game^ wea- taken olT ihe 
tiekel so we eould keep ihc eusl doMn 
for the students." 

The IX'parlmcni of Intcreollcgiaic 
Athletics dceided to make this year's 
price of a student season licket Shft. a 
decrease from last year's $^6 season 
ticket. Individual game tickets can be 
purchased for i5 for each game thai is 
excliulcd from the season liekei 

"fiven if they buy the ihrce games 
individually, il's going to K- ck'a|K'i 
than last year, " Adolph said 

Athletic Director Max Urick said 



ihe decision came last spring when 
ilic athletic department was putting 
ilic cumbo ticket logciher 

"We just look a lo«k at the number 
ol' games that happened over the 
vacation hrcak," Urick said. "We 
wanted to make it an option for the 
students to be able to buy them rather 
than having them pay if they couldn't 
go." 

Jush Swart/, senior in education, 
said he hkcs the cheaper ticket 

"It's a good idea," he said, "Wc 
shouldn't have to pay for the games if 
we're not going to be here to see 
them." 

Some student season-ticket hold- 
ers were disgruntled because they 
were not notified of the three-game 
exclusion before they bought the tick- 
et. 

Allison Rufihton, freshman in 
engineering, ofTeitd a solution to Ihe 
public notification problem. 

"They could have announced it at 
a I'oolball ganK.' she said. 

Matt Hcmpy, sophomore in politi- 
cal science, who is planning to attend 
the three games, said the athletic 
department shouldn't have excluded 
them from the ticket. 

"I feel like they're taking advan- 
tage of the situation," he said "Since 
we're buying season tickets, we might 
as well get the whole season " 




MEMBERS OF the 

Sigrna Chi new 
membef clots comp 
out in front of 
Ahearn fisid MouM 
lo gel baiktiboll 
ticksli. Ganeral 
admtMion basket- 
ball lickels went on 
sole oi 3 p m 
Tuesday 
tVikMKOIM 

Cdlogion 



Annual basketball camp out leaves Wildcat faithful in cold 



JACOt MNSONNJS 

They sat through (he chilly night air and fought oil 
bugs the entire time they were there 

Yet, afler 24 hours ol' staking out territory in front of 
Aheam Field House, the prize was finally claimed 

"I'm here for basketball tickets, and I'm not leaving 
until I gel them." said Kris Waymire. freshman in kine- 
siology "I'd stay here two or three days if I didn't have 
classes. It's quite an experience" 

l.dce fisher. Athletic fiekcl Sales Committee mem- 
ber, said everything went sminithly, but there were some 
different things to sec. 

"Kveryone was pretty iow-kc^ and behaved There 
were Chnstmas lights and even a toilet on wheels 
People even brought big generators for TVs," fisher 
said "It's great to see people support K-State basketball 
by camping out." 



About 2(1 groups participated in the camp out The 
groups ranged in niimhers from five to W people More 
than JtH) students sought ICAI tickets, aiul more than 
1 51) students camped tor general admission tickets 

Tamru Wilhelni. I'reshman in secondary education, 
said the liouble is worth it 

"We arc the true lans We sit outside and lay here m 
front of our lenis when we could he doing something 
else. Plus, It's I'un," Wilhclm said "The people that did- 
n't camp out will go lo the games, but us campers will 
actually appreciate our seals. We'll be the ones scream- 
ing the loudest when it finally comes game time" 

What's It like lu slay the night as a camper'.' 

Waymirc said il is fun. but il has its drawbacks 

Tor inslanee, last nighl Waymirv spent the night shiv- 
ering under his sleeping txig and swatted bugs that eon- 
tinuousl) huz/ed around his head 

"I woke up a( least three times last night to swat an 



ant (hat was crawling on me I hen I shivered myself 
hack to sleep," Waymirc said 

f Ithcr campers didn't have it quite as rough. Several 
groups brought generators to power their Nintendo^, 
telcv isions and stereos 

Whether \bi;'^ were sleeping under a tree braiKh or 
sleeping in the lomlori of their own couches hauled to 
Alicarn, all (he cainpi-rs were awakened Tuesday morn- 
ing hy ihc women's buskethall (cam passing out dough- 
nuts 

"It was Worth camping out |ust for that," Waymire 
said "When she tapped on our tent and asked if I want- 
ed one, I knew I had survived the night Plus, it's not 
every day that I gel break last m bed" 

"I'm glad I did i(. but I'm glad it's over," Wilhclm 
added "If Ihc basketball team does gtKxl this year, it will 
all he worthw Ink I lopelully, this is just a sample of (he 
fwn yci (0 come," 



''We are the true fans. We sit outside and lay here in front 

OF OUR tents when WE COULD BE DOING SOMETHING ELSE." 

TAMRA WILHELM, FRESHMAN IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 




THE 

K'STATE 

ROUNDUP 

coMMUoav 



NKW BASKF.TBAl.l. COACH 

Brcnl Hargcn has been promoied ttt the posi- 
tion of interim assistant haskciball coach by head 
coach Tom Ashury for the I947-')K season. 

Harden is in his third season as a member of 
the K-State basketball siatT He was promnicd 
from the position of basketball operations man- 
ager to academic counselor before his most 
recent move within the program. Me also handles 
a variety of other administrative duties 

Rargen played collegiate basketball at fXiane 
College in (fete. Neb, where he helped his team 
lo a conference title as a senior during the I W2- 
93 school year Bargcn averaged 12 points, six 
rebounds and three assists that year en route to 
earning all-eonfcrcnee honors 



He began his coaching career as an assistant 

at [X>rchcster High School in Nebraska in 1943 
and then spent a season as an assistant coach at 
Nebraska Wesleyan University, where he helped 
the Plairtsmcn to the Sweet Ifi of the NCAA 
Division III national tournament. 

TICKETS REMAIN FORVITALE EVENT 

Tickets are still available for Ihc Oct .10 din- 
ner featuring basketball analyst Dick Vitalc. Me 
will be (he featured speaker at a dinner, with pr\)- 
cceds going to the Mike Ahearn Scholarship 
fund. Tickets for the buffet meal are 45tl, tables 
of lU are $S(X); and Slam Dunk tables that 
include nine guests, a K-Stalc player and nine 
autographed photos of Vitalc arc SMKI 

A reception will begin at 5:15 p.m., followed 
by dinner at 6 p m. at the Manhattan Holiday Inn 
and Holidome. Tickets can be purchased through 
the K-State Athletics Development Office at 
Bramlage Coliseum or by calling 5.12- 7W2. 

TEXAS TECH GAME TO BE TELEVISED 

Tlic Nov. I football game between K -State 



and Texas Tech in Luhbock, Texa.s. has been 
selected to be regionally televised hy the Uig 12 
Syndicated Network KickotT has been changed 
to II .10 a in 

the game can be seen on WIHW-TV iTCI 
channel 3) out of Topeka in Manhadan, and 
regionally on WDAF-TV in Kansas t itv and 
KWCH-TV in Wichita 

WOMEtS'SCOLEERS IN THE HI NT 

The K-State women's golf team trails only the 
University of Kansas with a two-round total of 
644) at the Sunflower Manlynn Smith Invitational 
in Andover, Kan 1 eading the Wildcats is junior 
Jane Yi, who is iicd for sixth ( JtO-77- 1 57), going 
into the final day of (oumamcnt play 

KU shot u two-round total of 632 ( 3 1 5-3 1 7) to 
lead the tournament Wichita State's Natasha 
Ausder^u has a 1 50 total to hold the indiv idual 
lead 

Other K-State scores include hdic Murdoch 
(N1-77-I5S, ninth), Ann Slater (83-77 - 160. 
Ilthi, Mit/i Taylor (K3-K2 Ifi5. T-17lh) and 
Carrie Chambers (K5-87= 1 72. T-32nd). K-Slatc's 



Traci Hennmga is competing as an individual and 
tsin3lstplace()(8-f(3-|7h 

The linal round of tlie tournament, of which 
are hosts K-Siate and Wichita Stale at the 5,%2- 
yard par 71 Icrradyne Hotel Kcsurt and (iolf 
Club, was played Tuesday, 

CREW FINISHES J I ST IN B«)SION 

The K-Siate women's rowing team finished 
3 1 st of 5(1 bouts in the Championship I- ights race 
Sunday al Ihc prestigious Head of the Charles 
regatta, in Uoston, Mass The t ats' lone entry 
tinished with a time of 17 minutes, 23 47 sec- 
onds Rowing Canada took first place with a time 
of 15:44 77. 

The Cats finished ahead of Big \2 partici- 
pants Colorado, a club team, and Kansas 

K-Slatc IS back on the water this weekend al 
the Head of ihe Iowa regatta, lo be Saturday and 
Sunday in IX's Moines, [owu 

VOLLEYBALL TEAM TO APPEAR ON T\ 

K-Stale's home volleyball matchup with the 
Texas Longhorns on Saturday will be broadcast 



by fox Sports Net, marking the second appear- 
ance on thai network by the Cats this sea.son. The 
game will be aired on a tape-delayed basis on 
Sunday fox Sports Kocky Mountain (TCI 
( hannel 3X| is the regioiul fox Sports Net affil- 
iate 

rile Cats, working on a five-match winning 
streak, also play fexas A&M at 7 prn. Friday at 
Ahearn field House 

MEN'S <;OI,F HMSHINC FALL SCHEDULE 

K-Stulc's men's golf team is finishing the fall 
poriioit i>f Us schedule this wc-ek at (he Louisiani 
Tech Inicrcollcgiaie in I alhoun, la. 

Uranl Ik'nninga followed up a first-round 75 
w ith a career- low one- under- par 7 1 to move into 
a third-place tie alter Monday's second round 
Ills prevHHis best was a 72, which he achieved 
last season al the Red Raider Invitational in 
I ubhtvck. Icxas. 

.Vs a leam. K-State sh«)t a 5*W ( t23 1 after the 
(irsl two rounds The Cats are in third place out 
of 14 teams, nine shuts otT the lead held by 
Arkan.sas Slate 



Oklahoma Sooners' fans bitter at thought of losing 5th straight to team it once dominated 



Bitter hotline, Sooners speaking How can wc 
twip you^ 

Welt, first of all, the Sooners are helping (he 
Wildcats with (heir pockeibooks. The la^it line I 
saw on this game said K-S(atc was a seven-and- 
a-half point 
favorite Sources 
close to me and Las 
V«ga.s tell me this i!( 
ewy money. Why? 

The Cats are 
living for (he pre- 
scn( and looking 

for (heir fifth win i u n d 1 1 

over Oklahoma MILLS 

Natiuital pcrspee- tun ou Mm ,i\. m^ ^ 
tive, the .Soonersi •iKkww towmilhin ^(WMnd 
and their fans JuHt ^wr »iiioil c«immm« b Smi Dm m 
can't shake the «/«*••»» •* 

(HUl. 

Oklahoma has a deep-seeded history in col- 
lege football Mo«t college football fans recall 
the nucccsM) by the Sooners' all-limc wmningcst 
coach Barry Swit/cr, now with thoM pciky 
Dal la* Cowboys 




During Switzer's (enure, from l'J73-HK, he 
took Oklahoma to three national championships, 
1 2 Big 8 Conference championships and eight 
different bowl games in 1 3 appearances 

The Sooners were also the fint (cam ever to 
capture a back-to-back national championship 
more than once 

So it is easy to see how embittered fans can 
get when a program kitown for consistent success 
doesn't deliver 

Sooners coach John Blake, who, when he 
took over the coaching position in 1996, was the 
youngest bead coach in Division l-A college 
tmtball. III getting back to (he basicn in Norman 

Lost weekend against Baylor, he benched 
(|uancrback Justin Fuente, who had started in the 
five games prior In went option man f-.ric Moore, 
who, III his second utan of the season, rushed N 
times for 141 yarda and tin for an 84)-yard touch- 
down. 

Blake said he wanted to go back to the option, 
something Sooner football is known for As an 
astiitanl at Oklahoma, Switzcr suggested trying 
(he wishbone ofTense, from which the (riple 
option is often run. This offensive switch led to 



Oklahoma^ football dynasty of (he 1970s and 
later 1980s. 

"We're going to run the option, because that's 
part of my heritage," Blake (old the Associated 
Press after the Baylor game He played hi 
Swit/erfrom 1979-82 

"We have the right personnel to do it. Eric has 
done a good job of giving us a chance to run the 
option" 

The Sooners needed to do something The 
team is now 3-4, 1 -2 in the Big 12 fhcir first loss 
in Ihe Pigskin Classic to Northwestern 's Wildcats 
wa.s a big one, 24-0, and will undoubtedly be 
repeated this weekend by a differenr set of 
Wildcats 

Oklahoma's wins have all come at hotne. all 
close games within two points or less. Oh, wait. I 
forgot (he Louisville vic(ory, when the Sotinerii 
dominated 35-14 

That's an important one. because Louisville is 
1-5, with its one win coming in versus a wtnless 
Illinois, 

Not. 

It's lime for Oklahoma (o change something, 
but no change will stop the "lynch Mob" K- 



Statc's defense, especially in (he rush depart- 
ment, came into its own against Texas A&M last 
weekend If three different backs named DeMond 
Parker had three balls, not one would make it 
thnmgh the "Mob" and get near the end /one 

"We're riding high," junior linebacker Trav is 
Ochs said Tuesday Ochs recalled letting the 
Sooners back into the game m the tourlh t|uarter 
last year and said "Our plan is not to do that this 
year " 

Oklahoma will be hungry for their fourth 
home win This battle wi(h the Sooners has 
become healed, and la.st season Ihe Cats became 
the fourth leam to win four straight games 
against (he SiKiners 

"Oklahoma is a perennial power in football." 
defensive end Joe Bob Clements said. "We've 
been like the li((le stepbrother." 

On a tip, I cruised the Hig 1 2 web site, which 
can he found at www.gobigl2.com Wow, was 
there some bitterness to be found 

Souk of the more amusing things I found 
there said how the Aggies were overrated and 
really dim't have a vaunted rushing attack 1 pet- 
.utnally can't wait until Nov 1 5. when the Aggies 



roll into Norman and roll all over the miiJdle-of- 
I he- road Souners' rushing defense 

There were other mean-spinted, uncalled-for 
comments that an'n't fit to print on paper, so I 
won't go (herc Bu( the gist of it is (his: 

Oklahoma fans want this win. because the 
idea of losing five m a nw to a team (he Soonen 
heal 21 times in a row between 1971-92 makes 
then mariHin bItHid btui 

"1 think It's just the rise of K-State football," 
t lemcnts said "Maybe thc7'rc not taking it very 
well" 

I'll say They can't face the reality that their 
oncc-excelleni football program has a long way 
to go bcfiKC it reaches that level of excellence 
again. 

Blake IS a giHid coach with credible experi- 
ence He could be the guy to get the Soonen up 
there again 

But not this year And definitely not against 
the Cats this weekend. 

My prediction Cats 4 1 , Sooners 18. 

(And pay no attention to the whole Brave* — 
Orioles prediction My swamic was having a bad 
hair day. f 




KANSAS STAT E COLLEGIAN 



KMYOUnON 

•mil gnftiK*iiii 




WEDNESDAY 



OCTOBER 22 



1 9 



DAILYcrossword 



ACROSS 

1 Qrow tired 
5 Cougar 
B Comedi- 
enne 
Hooks 

12 Caron role 

13 Two peas 
in — 

14 Coach 
Parse- 
ghjan 

15 Black Sea 
arm 

16 Ou- 
champ's 
staircase 
descender 

17 Ervergy 
IB Cracker 

spread 

19 Mimic 

20 -Wel- 
come" 10 
thelral 

21 Aries 
appel- 
lation 

23 Hot tub 

25 Mother 
ol our 
country? 

2B It gets 
under 
your skiri 

32 "Hi'" to Ho 

33 Disdain 

34 Racetrack 
oHicials 



36 Ott ttie 
boat 

37 Motorists' 
org. 

38 Spelklown 

39 "You Bet 
Your Lite" 
host 

42 Vegas 

intro 
44 Verifiable 
4B Exploit 

49 Type of 
joint 

50 Hoodoo 

51 Article in 
Time? 

52 The Tent- 
maker 

53 Mayberry 
boy 

54 Slugger 



Williams 

55 Branch 

56 Track 
transac- 
tions 

DOWN 

1 Try to fly 

2 Loma's 
half-sister 

3 Biltions 
and 
billions 

4 Down- 
sized 

5 Jipifapa 
hat 

6"— and 
Away" 

7 Hardly 
boastful 

8 Ctiric 
cooler 



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9 Hirt hit 
lONetohbor 

of N.Mex. 
lUob- 

applicalion 

datum 
20 Ruthless 

critique 
22 Butler's 

mate 
24 ad hat 
25Awel- 

oome sight 
2«-The 

Qreaiest* 
27 Computer 

acronym 
2Btevv«ll 

30 Stick 
figure? 

31 indivislbia 

35 Dell 

pu release 

36 Take in 
39Hardty 

AKC 
quality 

40 Carolif^a 
county 

41 OboiBts 
need 

43 Leadino 



Yesterday'* ansviwr 



10-11 



45 Mature 

46 Troop 
group 

47 Divorcees 
49 Eight bits: 

abbr. 




Adventures in Shanghai 



City filled with crowds, 
skyscrapers, neon signs 



\^ 



KfVTH JACOU, 

spcttil Ki [he 
t'olk'tiian 



^ looll it up in 
riwiCoHtgian 



The Collegian it 
motntamirig on 
archive ot oil 
Irovelog sioriei 
Goto 
colltgian kiv t<ki 



For artstivers lo today's crossword, call 

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JSDT SGA GQ DUBYRNRj 

SZJDY BZVRN1 JZ SROD 

JSD RQQDUBDORDQNDA. 
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: WDN'T MOST SCARE- 
CROWS SAY "HAY, MAN! " TO EACH OTHER? 

Today's Ctyptoquip cluf : Q equals N 
lOOKINGback 

1*71 - 1 (ilk sinfL'vt, Id.w Ike/, rectivtiii a jiokt record for her hit. "The 
Niyhl ik-> DfiuL- Old Dixie IXiwn". It turned Mil lo be her biggesil liil, 
pcakifi)." ai tti im the ehnrls ((Jelohi-r 2. 1971 1. 

1986 ■ OS. I>re>ideiil Ronald Keagiin signed the "Tax Refonn Act" ol 
l«IKft nn this day. hul wrote his last name firsi The signing, hovrever. 
rciiuins k'y.al. 

ADhoc 




£M/cJr YOUg AHMOe H^ SPlD^Hi. 7/f/S /rnHMM'.^ 



^m^ 




ived in Shanghai. China, in the wH.'e hours of the morning on On 
4, stt 1 was asleep when the ship docked That was h shame becatise I 
always enjoy standing on deck and vvatching our approach to a new cil\ 

1 dt»n't know what I expcded of my t'lrsi glimpse of China, hul what 
I saw when J liwkcd out nty windo* wasn't anything even close lo what 
I imagined. TTiere. diretlty across Ihe fluangpo River, was this huge, 
futuristic ■l(M)kmg slruelure that would have been ai home in "Kuek 
Rogers m the 2Sth Cenlury" ll turned out to he the F\;arl of the Orient 
TV lower, Shanghai's nuist a'cngni/able landmark and the tallest sinie- 
turc in Asia. I've never seen anything quite like it. except, perhaps, in a 
Jelsoit's cartoon. 

The rest of the city's skyline 
WIS nol al all what I expected. 
.Skyscrapers are going up every- 
where The entire cily seems to he 
one giant construction area. I've 
never seen so much construction in 
my life. 

The nexl thing to shock me was the number of huge neon advertis- 
ing signs thai peppered ihe skyline: Sprite. Phillips, Volkswagen, i uji 
I'llin. China is del uiiiely open for business, and the international cor- 
poral ions are taking advantage of il. It seems the I'hiiKse governmeni 
Il3!i taken a long, hard Unik at Hong Kong and seen what ihe Chinese 
people were capuhle of under a free-niarkei system So they've opened 
the Chinese market, and a phenomenal amouni ol" foreign capital has 
started Oowing into China, hence all ih; conslniction 

Bui gc-tting off the boat, 1 found the old China still there. Between 
the shiny, glass-and-steel corporate office buildings arc polluled, 
crowded streets, lined v^ith dingy, decaying buildings built under 4ll 
years of communism This is the old Shanghai, ll is being eradicated by 
the city's incredible new growth, but it's dcrinilely still Ihere. 

Probably the most unpleasant thing about Shanghai is the smell. The 
smog is cMreme, and ihe rivers stink like a cesspool, clogged with die 
ravi sewage and trash of a billion people. Knvironmental concern is one 
area in which Shanghai has a long way to go. 

The evthangc rale ^li H ) uan to the dollar makes almost everything 
here cheap. I spent about S 1 5tt in five days in Shanghai including 
food, stiuvemrs. postage back to ihc slates, taxi rides and admission fees 
10 lourist sites In Japan I spent close to SlINJ a day 

Swin after we docked in Shanghai, close to two-thirds of the ship- 
board coinntuniiy biKirdcd buses to catch a flight to Beijing. The option- 
al inp io t 'hina's capital was pretty expensive, so some sluitenis. like 
myself, opicd lo spend our whole time in Shanghai. We called ourselves 
"The Shangolilion. " and we had the ship pa>iiy much to oursclveN for 
several days ll was nice lo focus and rctlcci on Shanghai without hav- 
ing to contend with the crowds on -ship There were enough crowds to 
contend with m the cily. 

And crowds there certainly were. With a population of more than I 3 
billion. ( hina is renowned for its population problems. It kind ot puts 
you in awe of China to thmk Ihat one person oui of every five on this 
planet is Chinese. 

On my first day in Shanghai I took a guided tour of the city, visiting 
llic Yu Yuan gardens, the lamous Jade Buddha temple and ihc govcrn- 
mcnl-tiperated "l-f lendship Store." where foreigners are inv ited \k\ buy 
all sorts of Chinese and imported products at rvasonablc prices. I also 
weni to an acrobatics show, which turned out to be one of the hest parts 
of my visit. Ihe ( hine.se have a reputation lor producing fantastic acro- 
hiits. and this was certainly Ihe case: jugglers, lumhlers. coiiiortionists 
and balancing .icl-- all seem lo he done wilh incredititc case 

Right ne\t ifooi to Ihc acrobatics .sht>w w.is Shanghai's nwn Hard 
Rock Cale. A sizable number of Semester at Sea students went lo I lard 
Rock while we were ihere. some every nighl I hey preferred the 
American-style food and atmosphere to urban Chinese places, and the 
arguments got healed when the students who came to China lo experi- 
ence China accused the students who went to Hard Rock of having 
come on ihe it ip just to party "Why come to China," the argument weitl. 
"it all you're going lo do is hang out at ihe American party places.'" 

Needless to say, the issue was not resolved, and the student lite siafl' 
had to tell cveryotie to dnip the issue and slop harassing those who feci 
compelled lo keep going to American-style establishments. So much tor 
harmony among college student!) 

On Sunday morning, I made a tnp to the (People's Park in what is 
called "l:nglish Comer" This is a small part of the park where Chinese 
pei^le praeiice their Ijiglish. They were, of course, delighted to have a 
native speaker's help, and I met some wonderful people in the process. 

I met a university student named Gu Ming, (iu is studying electrical engi- 
neering at Shanghai Jtao long University, and he spoke very good Inglisli ^e 
had some interests in common, and vve ended up spending the whole day togelh- 
ei. so he had someone to .speak Inglish with and I had a milive guide, fie took 
me to lunch at a delighllul little hole-in-lhc-wall noodle shop run by Chinese 
Muslims from Ian /hou province, showed me around his university and let me 
check my e-niati at his tin iverni I y's computer center Me also iniritduccd me to 
his girlfriend. Ihe three of us halt dinner ti^ethcr at a traditional Chinese 
dumpling lestaurant. and 1 promised to keep in touch with him I had made a 
friend in Shangliai. 

The not d.iy I took a special tour tilled "Tasting the life of a Typical 
Shanghai Cili/cn." one of the trips sponsored by Semesier at Sea We visited an 
opcn-air fish and vcgeiable markel, a grocery store, a kindergarten and a coni- 
munily ccnler. 

We were invited lo visil a 'lypical" family in their home and have a meal 
Thai was pretty tK'ai. Mr Min and most of his family spoke no hnghsh. but their 
niece, a college student, did So we talked with her. f-'veryone else jusl nodded 
and smiled and said "llao chr," which means delicious food, and ii was 

Tl»e following day. I went wilh a group to a local mateniity hospital to leaiii 
about family planning in China With one- filth of the world population to feed, 
t hma is big on birth control. Laws for city dwellers are very strict only one 
child IS allowed per family Women who become pregnant w ith a second child 
arc strongly encouraged to get abortions, and if you violate the one-child law. 




THE PEARL OF THE 

Stionghoi. China ll i: '„ 
lure in Atia. 



ORIENT TOWER li d..,-. ily occioh the Hwor^gpo River In 
.ajiji.ji s moit (ecogiiizoble londmork and it is the lollast jtruc- 



you face stilT fines, ostracism and ptissibly c>ven losing your job. 

lo mosi Westerners accustomed to total reproduclivi' freedom, this might 
sccin ratficr li.irsh. bin to me it is ihe must loetcal and humane approach for ihe 
Cliinese. Vou liave to imagMtc what il would tv like il everyone had the freedom 
111 have multiple children and this caused those children to starve lo death 
1 toiu lhat pcrspeclive. il is far better to have only one child who nourishes than 
have niulliplc children wfio sniTer But il always gives me pause to liHik al Ihe 
people ol Shanghai and reali/e almost none of them have siblings 

My last day in Sliangliai turned out t<i be a bit of a disaslei when I learned 
Ihe hard w.iy iliai t Itina is nol designed with very lall people m mind. At 2 
meters ull tii tcel ^ inches). I cerlaiiilv stand out in a crowd. While walking 
hiick lo ihe ship, I blindly walked into a w indim air conditioner hanging above 
Ihe sidewalk Ihe collisiim caused a divp gttsh in my scalp, which Ned pro- 
fusely 

Wficn I got hack lo the ship, leaving a substantial trail of bloinl behind me. 
the mt^^c on duly sutured up tny head seven si itches in all CikhI thing I had 
goiicn iiiv lelanus sliol at Lafcne I leahli Center on campus siHmly before 1 left 

I spent the rest of the day on ship, reciipe rating, writing postcards and rcgal- 
itiu ifie siudcnis returning from Heijing with stories of flow I was alLicked by an 
evil ( fnuL'se ,ur L'lindilioiicr 

Seeing ( hina in tk' iiiidsi of such a huge transition was Iksc nulling. I think 
I wiiiild like III iciurn here in 10 or 20 years to sec how much il will change. 1 
hope Ihc changes will be tor the best. 

/aijiun. t hung-kwo. 



NUMfiER9 



DILBIRT 





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CHCCI*. BACK, 
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^ 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1997 



SGA 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

"If wc impose this I'cc. we're niX real- 
ly considering iKckjc people who ure 
more worried ahmit alTordintE education 
than getting a Foutlrull ticket," he sa\<i. 

Truax said although siudenis who 
eouldn'i afTurd the fee or don't attend 
the games are a minority, iheir argu- 
ments against the fee should still be 
heard. 

"We should really be considering ihc 
minonly gmup in this issue." Truax said. 
"It is (he minority group, probably, that 
will not be able to pay the pnvilegc lee 
or not be able to afford to go to football 
games. But I think wx" should consider 



their ease as well " 

Bret (ilendening. agriculture student 
senator and Privilege Kee Committee 
member, said student si should help pay 
for the expansion, probably through a 
fee. 

"It's only fair thai sludeitts help pick 
up some of the lab on it. Whether it's one 
plan or the other doesn't matter to mc. 
bui I think wc should help pay for the 
expansion," he said, 

Glendening said in running students 
about options should help generate suppuri 
lor I he ercalion ul a new privilege fee. 

"If the message gels out. I think a loi 
of students would be in I'avor or it. espe- 
cially when I hey realiice it's lor the bet- 
lermcni of the f<K)lball program and the 
univcrsily as a whole," (ilendening said 



Woman's standoff becomes symbol for anti-government groups 



Seats 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

whole benefits from participation by 
everyone. 

"There's probably some people here 
who don't use Lafenc, but there's still a 
student fee to support it for everybody. 
As a result, there's a higher quality of 
services provided." 

Football eoach Bill Snyder said stu- 
dents who don'i have the opportunity to 
use the stadium now could use it under 
the new plan because more seats will be 
created. 

"We're hoping Ihat the expansion 
would benefit the university as a whole. 
and espceiall) the student body We want 
to get all the students wc can gel in here. 
They're great in the way they respond 
but wc can'i get them all in here," 
Snyder said. "Hopefully, there are sever- 
al thousand out there that want to get m 
here. This would allow them that oppor- 
tunity" 

Snyder said although students might 
not think they will benefit from a stadi- 
um expansion, the overall effect would 
help the university. 

"It's like a building for the school of 
architecture. Not everyone is into archi- 
tecture, but It's kind of a team-type of 
thing We all need to help each other 
out." Snyder said "The football team 
doesn't need to be the recipient of every- 
thing on this campus, but it's important 
to work together as a student body and as 
a community" 

Kim Wiggans, graduate student in 
Spanish liieraiUR'. said she suppons the 
idea of stadium expansion but also 



thinks other campus priorities should be 
addressed by privilege fees; specifically. 
a reeeni lO-percent tut in periodical sub- 
scriptions at Hale library has affected 
research capabilities, she said. The cre- 
ation of a periodical ftx has been pro- 
posed and Wiggans said she would sup- 
port thai improvement first 

"I don't really mind paying a privi- 
lege fee for stadium expansion." she 
said, "But I think if it's going to be 
important to improve the fmithall stadi- 
um, then there needs to be equal impor- 
tance placed to improve the quality of 
the library, as well The library is just as 
important as the football stadium, if not 
more." 

Urick said he rcali/es the importance 
of academics. 

"You'll never catch me talking for 
athletics and against academics." he 
said. Urick said stadium expansion 
shouldn't be overlooked for library 
needs, and both are important. 

"My counsel and guidance to stu- 
dents would he to vote 'yes' for both," 
Urick satd "They arc Ixith very real 
needs. They're legitimate and ihej have 
been identified" 

Though the creation of fees for stadi- 
um expansion and library penodicals 
would boost K-Stale's student fees, 
Urick said the cost would be worth it. 

"I sincerely feel for students who feel 
a fmaneial pinch. No one likes to pay 
more," Urick said "I dim't like to pay 
more for a loaf of bread at the store or a 
gallon of gas at the filling station, but I 
do know that the cost of operation and 
the cost of living go up. If I want to con- 
tinue to enjoy those things. I have to pay 
more," 



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Interfaith Sharing 

Christian-Jewish-Muslim 

'Understanding Christian Liturgical Worship'' 

Thursday, Oct. 23/ 9:15 p.m. 

St. Isidore Chopol 

7 1 1 Deniton 

Com. and join us for on explanation of ChriiHan 

^^orfhip by Father K.ith W.b.r and ihar. in th. 

larvic. followad by r.fr.f hmants and convarsation. 

Spensorad by tha KSU committa. on raligion and 

campui minittrifli j 



FREE ADMISSION 




Presented by Manhattan Christian College 

October 23 i& 24 
8:00 p.m. 

All Faiths Chapel 
on the K-State Campus 
ADMISSION IS FREE 

C»iMnw> v>« OnfMw^v UukM kr .o'«i-tMitM Jfttk 

MvK *n4 NK I Vila Iff lilapAWI SclMWU 

0«H% PiMucM «t> «)• l<«w Vert s>B» »r i*g» t^ ■ -aliMfyilMWl OiJKun'Jw**' ■kA 



ADMIT ONE 

^ r\ 



r 



ASSOOAnO PUIS 

Rm\. 111. To neighbtirs, 51-ycar- 
old Shirley Ann Allen was the harmless 
loner who sometimes talked of spies in 
helicopters or sprung from ditches to 
surprise people. 

Outside this rural community, she 
v^as unknown. 

That was before Allen ttwk up her 
shotgun and threatened sheriff's 
deputies who were sent to take her away 
for a ciHirt -ordered psychiatric exam 

In a standolT that has ^one on for a 
month now. she has fended otTa tear gas 
attack by slathering petroleum jelly on 
her face, withstood bean Kag bullets by 



wearing tjeavy layers of clolliing and 
ignored the Harry Manilcw songs blared 
through loudspeakers. 

Now. the woman is in the national 
spotlight, the darling of right-wing 
groups who feel she is the latest example 

aller Ruby Ridge and Waco of 
innocent civilians being bullied by 
over/caloiis law enfnrcenicnt. 

Radio talk hosts across the nation 
have used the ca>e to engage callers in a 
debate ahoui property rights, mental 
health laws and the right to bear arms. 

"The American people are not going 
to take this lying down." said I homas 
Wayne, a spokesman for a Michigan- 
based group 



Wayne said the vvoman's cause ts 
compelling, because she has not been 
charged wiib any crime, yet must live 
under 24-hour surveillance of state 
police. 

The iitandolT began with the court 
order obtained by Allen's family, who 
had bs'gun to vuirry abtuil her increas- 
ingly bi/arrt behavior and depression 
since her husband died of cancer in 
1'>K4 

Allen holed up in her home in Roby, 
about 2l) miles southeast of Springfield, 
iilkr telling shcnM V deputies and her 
brother to get (til her properly 

She fired at officers tw itc during the 
early days of the standoff, wilh no 



m juries 

1 he second shotgUn blast came after 
troopers pummeled her in the chest with 
bean bag bullets 

When deputies ined to drive her out 
with tear gas. she stuck her head under 
running water and used the petroleum 
jelly lo prevent her pores Irom absorbing 
the gas 

Weary police speculate that the avid 
canner has enough IVhhJ in her cup- 
boards to last several more weeks 

Allen's family issued a statement last 
week ovpressing support for police and 
(.*)( pressing Ihcir desire to get help for 

See STANDOFF, Page 10 



Decision 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

"fun the city afford to go along w ith 
a development like Ihis'.'" he asked In 
response lo his own question. Reit/ 
explained that if a development goes 
into the Norlhvicw neighborhood it 
must be ready to deal with the v^ater 
problem. 

"I just don't think we're ready for this 
yet." he said. 

After the rest of the commission 



spoke about the proposal w ith comments 
mirroring Reil/'s. it was put to a vote. 

Mayor lirucc Sncad culled for ihe 
commission's decision With a vote of 5- 
(t I he proposed annexation of tohen- 
Isrey's development was deemed unfa- 
vorable 

As Sncad nipped the gavel, giving the 
final decision, applause broke out in the 
lecture hall and a shout of "Thank you' ' 
was heard from a member of the public 

Wilh that. Snead said further discu^ 
sion iin the proptiscd annexation wa- 
now miwt. 



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fUl SHOT - f ALL 1997 

WALK-IN BASIS AVAILABLE: 

OCT, 16, 23 OR NOV, 6 
8:30-1 1 :30 a.m. or 1 :30-4:30 p.m. 

$6/STUDENTS 

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REPORT TO ROOM 121 




rzes 



All ofK'States Greek Houses 
will be honoring the 46 Kansans 
between the ages 18-25 that 
were killed in 1996 on KS 
roadways as a result of alcohol 

On Wednesday, October 22 at 
5:15 p^m. each house will light 
46 luminaries. This activity is 
part of NCAA Week sponsored 
by GAMMA. 



McCain 



Ord©;. 



yo, 



%. 




Fred Garbo Inflatable Theater Co. 



Artis Quort«t 

Saturday, October 25, 8p,m. 
Public: $16 Seniors: S14 Students: 



S8 



Since its formation In 1980. this Austrian foursome has delighted 
audiences at the Salzburg, Vienna, and Feldkirch Festivals and won 
prizes at the Cambridge and Rvian competitions Its CDs have won 
the Grand PrU du Disque and the Dinpason d'Or. its parked sched- 
ule stretches from Bangkok to Berlin and includes an annual series 
at Vienna's Musikverein, 

Experience the Artis's masterly interpretations of Schubert, Mozart, 
and Brahms. 

Fr«d Oar bo Inflatable Theater Co. 

Sunday November 9. 3p.m. 

Public: SI 6. Seniors: $14, Students: $8 

Enter a mesmerizing whirl of tumbling, rolling. Juggling, miming, 

bouncing and dancing that will inflate your spirits and open your 
eyes in amazemenl Pneumatic wizard Fred Garbo and Brazilian 
ballerina Dalelma Santos have won the praise and affection of audi- 
ences worldwide with a stage full of unique inflatable inventions the 
New York Times calls "helium light and hilarious." Don't miss the 
energetic duo who've been seen on "The Late Show" with David 
Letterman, at the Kennedy Center and who will perform later this 
season at Disney's New Victory Theatre In New York, 

R. Corlos Nokol and Peter Koter 

Friday November 14. 8p,m. 

Public: $18 Seniors: $16 Students:$9 

Thrill to mmic that transcends the boundaries of cultures and time 
when German pianist Peter Kater and Native American flutist R. 
Carlos Nakal perform In a joint concert. 

Call McCain at 785-532-6428 

You can chargo your Uckets to VISA, MaaterCard. or Discover Or flop by the 

box ofTlce, noon to b p m weekdays. 

ThsM events are supported by the K~State Fine Arts Fee 

V Presented In part by the Kansas Arts Commission, a slate agency, and Ihe 

^ National Endowment for the Ana, a fitderal agency 



^ 



it-M~^ . 



DEADLINES 

Clostrhad adt mil be placed 

by noon the 6oy b«lore ri« 

dole you wont your od to run 

Clouihed display odt muit be 

plac«d by 4 p m Iwo wording 

doys prw lo ifie dote you 

wonl ycwr od to (un 



OUfSTIONS! 
CAU SJl-USS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 32 



19 9 7 



CLASStFtED AD WRITING TIPS 

^ Uff itMiH or MTvicsf firit, Alwoyi put whot item 
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Don't UM obbrvYioHeni. Many buyer) ore con- 
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Gmttdtr including Ihc price This telli buyers if 
ifiey ore looking oi something in their price ror^ge 



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Will Koiin lOMiyht in Mc 
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DAVIS MOVES special- 
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FOUND; DOG around Sun 
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WordPerfscI SI bv SirTip 
son Perlting lot A2aor 
Denison CatlS37 7B09 

IMALE GRAV and whtle cat 

found. ApproMimately two 
years old. vary sfiinny. pos- 
sible broken leg or hip, has 
been hit tiy a car Please 
call T76- 203S 

OMl 



Partl«s>n -Mono 



ADO A eatra touch ot class 
to your next piarlyi Celt 
Wayite sWater Party lor 
portable hot tub rsntals. 
537-7687 

ADO A s 1.1 lash to your next 
bash Call Wet N-Wild Hot 
Tub's iot your next party at 
(913)637-1825 




For Rsnt' 
AptB. FitmlBh»J 

ONE, TWO, three-bed 
room, also studio nine 
month leasaa availalite Im 
madiaH poeeaaeion. Clean, 
quiet, csntraf locations 
most utiliiies paid. 
637^389 

SEEKING FEMALE room 
mate lo lakeovBr lease in 
Jmuarv Brand new fu^ 
rilehad four bedroom 
apartrT>en1 at University 
Comrttons. Wanderlul 
roommaloi btA, rtiovfng 
into greeli housing Call 
Annette, S39-6S73 

UNrVfMKTV COM- 
MOIM Rootnmalas naao- 
•d, Stvwil two-tiedroort> 



Uul75:stty" 

•New 

• Fully Furnished 

• 2 & 4 Bedroom 

• Alarm System 

• Swimming Pool 

HSW Leasing 



539-0500 

UNIVERSITY 



w 



APARTMENTS 

2215 COLLEGE AVE 



t10| 

For Ront- 

Apt. 

Unfurnished 



AVAILABLE NOWt 1 1 Siu 
dio apartment it within 
waiting ditlatica to uni- 
versily Everything elec- 
tric, water' trash paid 
539-«318 or 537^228 

AVAILABLE ONE, two, 
three, lour tied rooms, nice 
apartrrwrtls near campus 
wilh great prices. First 
month free 537-1668. 



2 Bedrooms for 
the Price of 1 

Ijmilcd number lei) 
call 539-2951 



CLEAN. ONE -BEDROOM, 
rvo pets, water, trash and 
gas paid Call 539-1975 

CUTE.ONEBEDROOfW 
apartment dose lo KSU 
campus 413 N t7tfi. $3851 
month witt> wafers trash 
paid Laundry facilities to 
cated on site Kit chert com- 
plete with stove, refrig- 
erator, and distnvasher 
Don t wait) Call MDt 
776-3804 

LARGE THREE BEDflOOM. 
two baths, one block to Ag- 
gieville and campus All 
utilllies piaid. Private park- 
ing Call tori Ph 637-7991. 



Apart men f > 
Livitig At Its Best 
I^rgr 2 -Bedrooms 
^ 

Sandtlnnc Apis. 
(^mhtid|>c S(|. Apit 



HiU 
Investment 

NOWLEASIHO. Oneto 
throe-bedroom apart 
rrwnts/ houses near KSU. 
S225toS650 Allletice 



S3»-«3B7. 

OCTOBER AVAILABILITY 
at 1005 Biuemont Ave. 
One bedroom, $385/ 
month . Water and trash is 
paid Close to campus Call 
MDI 77& 3S04 

ONE, TWO. three bed 
room, alto studio nine 
month leases available, tm 
madiiM poasassion. Clean, 
quIM, caitlral localiont 
rtwst ulfliiiQi paid 
537.«3«9 



1 Bedrooms First 
Month FREE 

(Lill tor Jjily 

.fp4'Ci,il * limitrJ 

ntunlw 539-2951 



ONE BEDflOOM APAflT 

MEfifT available imme- 
diafefy. Just across the 
street from campus at 1807 
Cotlege Heights, J396/ 
month Stove, refrigerator, 
and dishwashar included 
Water and treih paid 
Laundry fecilitiee located 
on site Call M[M tO viawl 
776-3804. 

SICK OF your loommatae? 
Take over lease on one 
txidroom apartmerti two 
blodia from campus on 
Seveleenih street Calf 
776-3804 

TWO- THREE BED- 
ROOMS One blodi to cam- 
pus. Very nice with ail 
•menttHM. Reasonable 
rent 539-4641 

TWO- BEDROOM AmRT- 
MEPfT wllhin wtHung dl»- 
lanee of KSLI AyailaMa 
now! 10» Osage. S495' 
mamh. WMtr end treih 
paid. Stov«, refrtgaraior, 
and diahwaehw. Call MDI 



UNIVERSITV COMMONS, 
two- tied rooms, one bath 
for spring semester sub- 
lease, S523/ month. Call 
566-0187 

UNIVERSITY TERRACE 
APARTMENTS Leasing 
toe fall or summer, large 
two and three- Ijedroom 
apartments with waafier, 
dryer hookufM. Pool S37- 
209S 

VERY ATTRACTIVE ipa 
Clous two-t»droom newly 
rerT>olded, central air con- 
ditiontng, washer' dryer, 
porches r yard, water and 
trash paid Call after 6p.m. 
or (eave a message 537 
2805 

WALK TO campus I Two 
bedroom apartment locat- 
ed al 1113 Bertrand. t500 
per month, aveilebfe im- 
n>ediately. Short term 
lease ok. Water and trash 
paid Has dishwastvet and 
on-site laundry Celt for 
and appointment MOI 
776-3804 



For RBfit- 
Mousos 

12TH a BLUEMONT 

Nice three bedroom 
house. FREE washer' dry- 
er, fronf back porches. Wa 
irr'nnsh paid On* bktck 
to campue. S6D0 
MT-M03 or (7B8I2A3. 
3&1S, leave message. 

BRICK HOME, new carpel, 
paint, three or four- lied 
rooms wittt two bath 
looms. Kitt^en eppliances. 
palio, erKlosed yard, close 
to campus, 539-1177 

FOURBEfJROOMHOUSE, 
915 N lllh street, no pett, 
availeble first of January, 
1700 538-4277 

HOUSE FOR rem at 1130 
Pomeroy. Four bedroom, 
two bath, with study 
S800' month, trash paid 
Close to campus Washer' 
Dryer ttookups. No pels 
Call MDI 776-3804 

TWO THREE BEDROOM, 
split level, clean Imme- 
diate possession. New cen- 
tral air and heating, taun 
dry hook upt. garage. 
Campus two miles 
637-8389 

TWOBEOROOM, ONE 

bath, washer/ if ryer, al^ 
conditioned Close lo cam- 
pus Brand new S400 plus 
utilities 1129 Clatlin. 
639-8673 or 17861842-8473 

1M| 

Roemmato 
WBiifd 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to 
sharfi ctnan. nice two-bed 
room apartrtteni. Close to 
campus plus Aggieville. 
S250 plus one-half utilities. 
Oetrdre. 537-1793' 532- 

ft MALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share two-tied 
room furnished apartment, 
close lo campus Call 
Mary for delailt 776-6728 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share four- bed- 
room, two bath duplex, 
one block from campus. 
Call 539-8494 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
warned, Woodway Apart- 
ments $265 a month plus 
one half bills, lease until 
June 19961(3031761 -1641 

FIRST MONTH and one- 
half free Free KSU perlt- 
irtg permit Ouiet, very 
nlM apartment Move in 
ffrtalsweek January, 
539-8977 

NON-SMOKING ROOM 
MATE lot responsible 
male. Laundry, catite, $140 
plus utilities. 539-}46S. 

ROOMMATE WAMTE D for 
two fjedfoorii house Non- 
smoker S220 per month 
Water trash paid Call 7 76 
7823 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 

WANTiO iij uika over 



$368/ month plus one-lhird 
utilities Three-bedriXHns 
and two baths Cloa* tO 
campus Call 776-9461 




SERVICE DlflECTONV 



RoBumo/ 

TWwfl 

63(4996 FOR all typing, 
WttUng, proof reading, 
lapa Irenecnpron, i papers 
Iheatit Jla»anerian. t»oks. 
raauntai. oovedatters) 30 
plus years ex penance 

NEED SOMITHIMa 

TVPEDT I II type papan 
for $1 per douMa'Cpaead 
page I can also type 
raaumet. Choose one ol 



my styles for $15 I'll create 
your style for $20 Call 
Wanda at 532-0724 7:30 
am - 3:30 p.m. or leave 
voice mail. 

21S| 

Dosktop 
PwbtlsWnfl 

SEIKO COLORPOINT Dye 
Sub combo wax thermal 
color printer. New in txix. 
Never used S2995 Lists al 
S8000 Call 776 6999 

2401 



MUBlClBnB/PJS 

FRATEHNITIES, SORORI 
TIES, Student Organifa- 
tions, and Ctubt- Book the 
best audio and visual Disc 
Jockey show available 
CDiC Energy has the high 
est quality tighimg and 
sound on the market to- 
day. 3000 watts of power 
featuring the most current 
music releesed. Competi- 
tive prices cell 
1316)492-1621 and leave 
message lor a price quote. 

asoi 

Autometiv* 
RBPBlr 

AUTOGRAFT 2Q1B Service 
Circle behind Wat Man 
Specialiring in Mtssan-Oat- 
sun. Honda, Toyota, Sub- 
aru, Hyundai and Maida 
S37-5049. 

28S| 

Othor 

SarvlcBB 

COMPREHEtMSIVE I^AJOR 
Madical Coverage for short 
or continuous terms for 
more information cell 
539-6949 

LOSE 37% MORE 

WfEKtKT... dnd 48% mora 
fat I Pyruvate has 25 years 
cfinicel feeling et a major 
US Medical Si^iool Prov 
en to lose more weight 
faster and keep it oHI All 
natural, safe Cell 888.839- 
9896 




EMPLOVMENT/CAREERS 



aiol 



M olp WBtrtBd 



$1000 POSSIBLE TYPING 
part time At Home Toll 
Free(1)B002189000E)tt.T- 
1916 for Usting 

$1600 WEEKLY potenltal 
mailing our circulars. No 
Experience Required Free 
in formal ion padiet Call 
410 7S3 8272 

SSOOt WEEKLY tu per 
envelope Send self ad- 
dressed stamped envel- 
ope: GMA. PO Box 13486, 

Atlanta, Georgia 30324 E 

mailGEItlMAn 

KET " BOlcom 

AONHNISmATIVE AS- 
SISTANT; Administtallve 
assistant needed for fast 
paced consi ruction office 
in I tie Manhettan' Ft. Riley 
area starting IDecemtior 
1997 Musi be able to 
work indeparvdenlty and 
welt with othets General 
duties include: Typirtg cor- 
respondonca, report!, con- 
tracts, etc.. Payroll, Invoic 
es. Maintaining check 
book, certified payroll, an- 
ewering pttones, filirig and 
purdtating supplies for (tie 
office Experience in Mi- 
crosoft Windows96. Lotus 
123andAS40aaplua Sal 
ary commensurate with ex- 
perience Ploase serKf re- 
sume to M.A. Morlenson, 
PO. Sox 1546, Columbia, 
MO 66206, Attn.: DaleHet- 
er. 

ARRANGE VOUfl Spring 
semester |ob now Kaw 
Valley Greenhouse. Inc. is 
intervfewmg now to start 
in December. January ot 
February Enjoyable work 
atmoiphere, competitive 
pey end oppodunlty. Call 
776~86S6 between 3:00 and 
430p.m 

CANtm'mLK?Wanta 

pan lime fob that peys full 
time 7 Want a guaranteed 
hourly wage, plus bonus- 
es? Then call mat M- F, 
1 p.m.- 9p.m., M7-4114 ask 
lor Sharon. 

COMPLITER IfKFORMA 
HON SpwMelist I •304 1, Part 
or Full-time, temporary po- 
sition, not to exceed 12 
months, in the Departrttant 
of Agronomy B.S. degree 
in computer iciertca ptus 
•ix months experience wilh 
Ct-»,Vlsuat Basic, and 
Windows 3 1/96 KfKMvl- 
sdge of lorage i 
rttent endr ore 
duclion lyatimeMpM 
tiuf nox reqtjired Sertd lel- 
ter of application, resume, 
tranacnpts, and snange for 
three letters of refertmoa to 
be eeni lo: Or. Oefry L 



Peslar, Head, Depanment 
ol Agronomy, Throckmor 
ton Plant Sciences Center, 
lenses State University, 
Manhattan. KS 66506-5501. 
Application deadline Oc- 
tober 29, 1997 Kansas 
State University is an Af- 
firmalive Action' equal op- 
ponunity employer. KSU 
encourages diversity 
among its employees. 

DATABASE PRO- 
ORAMMEII- Nenvorks 
Plus, the leader m provid- 
ing business, education 
and government computer 
services, has an opening 
for both full and half-time 
positions in our product 
development group. Ex- 
perience in database envi- 
ronments required. MS Ac- 
cess and HTML knowledge 
preferred Salary range 
$20,000 $36,000 plus bo 
nuses and benefits. Send 
rasumetoWBrd Morgan, 
NeMNKks Pfui, 31 7- A Ho us 
Ion Street. Manhattan, KS 
66602 

EARN FREETRIPS ft 

CASHf CLASS TRAVEL 
needs students to promote 
Spnng Break 19981 Sell 16 
trips Si tF,ivpl tr(i<*i Highly 
IfMlttvaled sludanta can 
earn a free trip A over 
S10.000I Choose Can- 
cun, Bahamas, Ma/atlan, 
Jatnaica, or Florida I Nonh 
America's largest student 
lour operalori Call Now* 
1-SDO-S38 6411 

INTEMNET SUPPORT 

Networks Plus lias an open 
ir>g for pad-time Internet 
support personnel Re- 
quires knowledge ot Wind- 
ows and Windows 95 hard 
ware and software setup. 
Need day and evening 
Bvailabiltty. $7' hour Send 
resurrw to Ward Morgan. 
Networks Rus, 317 A Hous- 
ton Street, Manhattan, KS 
66602 

JANITORIAL HELP in even- 
ings, iwo three hours each 
nig hi. Contact Don Manin 
tA Manhattan Medical Cen- 
ter, 1133 College Avenue 
after 4p.m, 539-6461 

NEEDWEB designer for 
local competitive real ee- 
lale market. For more in- 
formation cell 776-6311 

MRTTfME SECRETARY/ 
bookkeeper for local home 
builder Some experiervce 
with computerized ac- 
counting preferable. 
539-6640 01 556-4316 

fVkRTTIME WORK tor col 
lege students Make your 
own schedule. Earn up to 
$50. $200/ per vraek Prov 
en resume builder for all 
majors StJiolarships. in 
terships, co-opc available 
Coridltions apply. Work in 
Manhettan Interview at 
personnel office inTopeka 
Call (7^1228-1144. M F 
12- 4pm 

SECOND SHIFT Sludem 
Operator: Individual would 
be required lo worii one 
night a week (M- F)4p m 
12a. m {this semester us 
Wednesday nightl; one 
luntfiihiftawaeli. IM- F) 
lla.m 1p.m. (this semes- 
ter it'sThursday): and a 
■weekend rotation of Sal 
urdey tOa.m.- 6p.m. and 
Sunday noon to midnight 
(with a three hour break I 
one ot hwo weekends a 
momh: and working for 
full-time staff when they're 
siciiaranvscalion Stad 
ing salary is $5.40 per 
hour. Applications and 
complete job deacnplion 
available from Room 14, 
Hale Library Applications 
BCcefHed until 6p-m , 
10/34/97 For further in 
formation, call Gloria Ro 
bertson or Elaine Heller at 
632 4941 

SMALL JOB- move din im 
mediately for yard Leave 
message and phone 
number m box t>y front 
door al 1909 Kemar. 

TEMPORARY PAHTTIME 
and weekend help needed 
for furniture delivery 
Please epfity in person el 
Homestead Rental. 2332 
Sky-Vue Lane. One block 
south of Holiday Inn Hoti 
dome. 

THOROUGH HOUSE clean 
ing for couple with no pets, 
smoking, diildren Flexible 
sctiedu le Ad/acenttocam- 
puB Respond with letter 
and qualifications to Col- 
legian box 1. 

UTILITY BILLJMO CO- 
CMUNNATOR: City of 
Manhattar>. Kansas fpopu 
lation 44.000) is currantley 
seeking to lilt a Regular 
Full time position ol Utility 
Billing Coordinator Start- 
ing Salary $9 21/ hour 
fDOO). plus excellent ben- 
efits This position con- 
tributes to the operation of 
the Cualamar Servtca Of 
floe by •aeleting iha Cus 
lonMf Service Supervisor 
in the over ell i^xirdi nation 
of the utility billing opera 
tlon. Bachelors degree in 
putilic administration, busi- 
ness administration, man- 
agerriant, accounting, or re- 
MadMd preferred How 
ewtr. ralavant experience 
mey besubetiiuied for ed 
ucatlon Experience in 
PC's and mini computers 
is required. Experience in 
Guttomet relet I one is de- 
•Irtlila Experiervce in au- 



pervision is also desirable. 
A complete job description 
indicating knowledge, skill 
and abilities is available by 
request. Apply at the (de- 
partment of Human Ra- 
tourcea, 100 Manhanan 
Town Center, Suite 546, 
Manhanan, KS 66502, no 
later than Tuesday. Oclob- 
ei2a, 1997by5a0pm 
EOE M/F/OID 

WANTEDTUTDRS lor Prin 
ciple of Macroeconomics 
(ECON 1101. Intermediate 
Microeconomics lECON 
5201. Erwironmental Geog- 
raphy 1, Accountirtg Proc. 
and Contract iACCT 331). 
$6 50' hour (or under- 
graduate and $TO(V hour 
for graduate students wiifi- 
out assitlanfships Com- 
plete application at Holton 
201 

WANTED: STUDtNTWeb 
developer. Upto16hour&' 
per week Maintain and en 
hence Web site for Nation- 
al Oryantfalion hosted al K- 
State Research and Exten- 
sion Must hsvaHTML pro- 
gramming experience. 
Should have experience 
wilh different web author 
ing tools Some ex pen 
ence with graphics ens is 
helpful. Complete job de- 
scrljMion i> available at 
hnp://www.nn h o rg/job. htm 
Pidr up application in 
Room 211 Umberger Hall 

3301 

BuBlnoss 
OpporiunHiBB 

EARI^ MONEY and FREE 
TRIPS M Absolute Best 
SPRING BREAK Peckages 
available) I INDIVIDUALS. 
Student ORGANIZATIONS, 
or small Gf«OUPS want 
edfi Call INTER-CAMPUS 
PROGRAMS et 1 BOO- 
327-6013 or 
hnp://wyrw cipl com 




410 



HAVE AN IDEA FOR 

Haij.dween> 

CrBftdaiB** Trunk 

has a let of dothcc 

Bfid odds and ends 

to pick from. 



Thrtrt Shop 
tj*4 Plllsbury Dr. 



1S98 ROVAL PURPLEt 
^rchasa one todaY- 
Stop by 103 Kadiia. 
Buy now fof pttlif 
S24 09. 

ANTIQUES, COLLECTI- 
BLES, tools, books, furni- 
ture. estate jewelry, beer 
signs, thoueands of curi- 
ous goods. Time Mectiine 
Antique Maui and Flee 
Market. 4310 Skyway Dr. 
between Bnggs arvd alr- 
pon 539-4684 

CABLE DESCRAMBLER kit. 
$14 95 See all the premi- 
um and pay- per- view (fen- 
nels 18001752-1389. 

COOK BOOKS, Vintage li 
cense tags, encyclopedia s, 
bledi memorabilia, church 
windows, oriental furnitur 
and potery. Vintage rnaga 
iirtes. txnks. religuous. 
hats, radios, clodis. eulo, 
tools, cameras, albums, fur- 
niture, potery, estate jew 
eiry, American heritage 
booki. movie stills, tavern 
stuff, brass, trunks, mili- 
tary, tins, stems, 50* furni- 
ture, fluta. prints, floor 
lamps, new car trailer 
$1499, new 5x 9 till Irailier 
$599. BOOO Square leet of 
curious goods Time Ma- 
chine Antique end Flee 
Market. 4910 Skyway Dr. 
t}etween airport arid 
Bnggs Visa. MaslarCerd. 
layaway. 539-4684 open 
12:00pm - 6:00p.m Tues 
day thru Saturday. 

K STATE PURPLE Or GOLD 
GLITTiR. 100 pound 
drums. $76/ drum, you 
haul samples 786-IM3- 
190S, forcadencompu' 
serve.com 

SEfJJNG ALL my oil peini 
ing stuff. Some new. sortie 
used Call 776B999 

WWWSUPEHIOHA 
CURACOMVfEWouron 
tire line of new AND pre 
owned Acura s Ask lor Ps 
trick J. Sterner if rated 
Acura web site in the na- 
tion I 

41t| 

FumltMt* to 

Buy /toll 

JERRYS WHOLESALE 
CARPET Carpet romnanta 
and vinyl remnants. 504 
Yuma Mor>day' Friday, 
S:30e.m - 5:3cip,m. Sal 



Bam- 12pm Open to the 
public. 

4381 



CompirtofB 

NEW COMPUTERS- Fully 
Loaded Pentium MMX 
233 4gigHD $1499, Panii 
um MMX 200 2gig HO 
$1169, F*en1ium MMX 166 
2gigHD$1099 Computer 
Renaissance 537-4413. 



Music 
Instnimonts 

AMPEG REVEHBAROCKET 

Guitar Amp. Valley Arts 
Custom Strat Sh/le Guitar. 
Crate BX60 Bass Amp. Sa 
bine radi tuner. All equip- 
ment like new please Call 
566-9198 



Pots and 
»Mpplios 



BABY UMBRELLAS. Blue 
and gold Macaws, Hahnns 
Macaws, stureet. fun, cuddly 
rera Love Birds, Codietiles. 
539-1177 



Sporting 



GOVERNMENT SUR 
PL U 5 f ! Camouflage clof h 
ing, boots, rairywear. wool 
clothing. AlsoCARHAflTT 
VW)RKVt/EAfl Monday 
Friday 9o m 5 30pm Sat 
urday 9a.m.- 6p-m. St. 
Marys Surplus Sales. St 
Marys, Kansas. (785)437 
2734 



Storoo 
tqulpmont 



2Mrx to IN Bubwoofers. 
Kenwood 642 Amp, Ken 
wood Car Alarm Call 
Heath 565-9196 



Tickets to 
Btiy/Soll 



SELUNG FOUR KSU KU 
football lickett Teking 
best Offer irf Octotier 31 
Call (316)492-1521 and 
leave meseage with an olf 
er Seats are loceted in the 
north end ;one, general ad 
mission. 




TRANSPORTATION 



siol 



AutonMiblloB 



1979 FORD LTD station 
wagon, 537-2822 after 

5pm Use for hunting, 
fishing and tailgate picnics. 

1989 JEEP Cherokee, good 
condition. SIX cylinder, 
$5500, 539-9239 

GOODYEAR IMUD and 
snow tires. 17 inch, 8000 
miles Asking $550 Call 
Al at 637 2092 

SEIZED CARS fiwn 

SI 78. Porsches. Cadillacs. 

Chevys. BMW'S, Corvettes. 



Also Jeeps. 4WD'» Ybur 
Area Toll Free 1 000 218 
SOOOExl. A 1915forcur 
rent listings 

TOYOTA CAMAY 1963, 
four Cylinder, automelic, 
mags, air, power ■leering. 
power brakae, power wind- 
ows, no rust, good I ires. 
20OK miles $1000 or best 
offer. 539-4065 



BleyelBS 



SPECIALIZED M2 frameset 
plus free extras Excellent 
condition $350 or linsi off- 
er Celt Al at 637-2092 



MetorcycloB 



1991 HONDA 760 Nighf 
hawk. Red Exceltanl con- 
dition 13,000 miles $2800 
or l»st offer Caff 
539-7685 

1995 HONDA CBH 600 F3 
white/ purple/ yellow, low 
miles, excellent condition, 
$5250 or best offer 
666-9150 

FOR SALE Yamaha 1992 
Sece, red. sharp, $2999 or 
best offer 639-0293 




BrMk 



SPRINO BREAK SS- Ma 

jatlfin witfi Ciill(-ge Tours 
A I f f .1 r ri SI ! V4f n n ig hi s hotel, 
trdn-Jeis pjniris. For 
tjroLhuiti or earning FREE 
trip 1 800 396-^4896 
(www collt^etours.com I 

••SPRING BREAK. "Take 
2' •• Hiring flepsi Sell 16... 
Take 2 Free Honest Desti 
national Free Parties, Eats 
and Dnnits SunSfilesh. 1- 
SOO-426-7710, 




ptnuK 




CbsstfiedRATES 
1 DAY 

30 wordi Of leti 

i7l5 

eoch word over 20 

$ 20 per v«ird 

2 DAYS 

20 words or lei 1 

te40 

«och word over 20 

$25 per word 

3 DAYS 

20 words or lest 

$9 45 

aocK word over 30 

$.30 per word 

4 DAYS 

20 word* Of less 

$10.20 

eoch word over 20 

$.35 per word 

SDAYS 

20 words or less 

$t070 

eocti word over 20 

$ 40 pel v«(rij 

I conseculiy« day rolt [ 



HOW TO PAY 

All classifieds rnuit be 

poid in cK^nce unless 

you hove an account 

wiffi Student 

f^wblicotions Inc 

Cash, chflclt, 

MoilerCord (Df Viw ore 

occepted Tliere is a 

$ 1 service charge on 

oil returned ehecb 

Wb reserve ihs right to 

edit, reject or properly 

cbtsify any od. 



FREE FOUND ADS 

As o service to you, we 

Tw found Otis for three 

days free of charge 



COMfCTIONS 

If yoy find on error in 

your od, pleose call us 

Wb dccepi ^elponsibil^ 

ty only for the first 

wrong insertion. 



CANCEUATIONS 

if you sell your item 

before your od has 

expired, we will refund 

you (or ihe remaining 

<iaft You mull coll uj 

before noon the day 

before the od is to be 

published 



HEADUNES 

For an exlro charge, 

we'll put a heodline 

above your od to colch 

the reader's ollention 



Chase [Manhattan 
Apartments 

Corner of College and i^E 

Claflln, Manhattan ^ 

now LEASING FOR ^ 

rHEXT SEI^ESTER m 

- 1 , 2. 3 ac 4 Bedroom Units ^ 

'Deck/Patios for each unit ^ 
'On-site Gym, Pool. AT Laundry ^ 

^'Covered Parking ^ 



CALL TODAY!! 
(785) 776-3663 



000 



BULLETIN BOARD 



HOUSING REAL ESTATE 




5w?§ 



2&SS 



We "Knead" You! 

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10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEOrAN 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOaEB 22, 1997 



Boston University sues term-paper companies p 



ASMXUTtD MISS 

HOSION N«rd ii report on 
McCarlhyism' That'll be $54 A 13- 

page L'xplui)alu>n ot'murdi luck k $65 - 
ethical ihcor)' cosis a bit more. 

|}()lh reports are advertised on the 
World Wide Weh pages t»C cotnpaiiies 
sued in federal court Monday by Doslon 
(Jniversity, which accuses thcni of sell- 
ing term papers over the Iniemcl to a law 
clerk posing as a sludeni. 

The lawsuit alleges wire fraud, mail 
fraud and racketeering, and specifically 
charges eight cumpanies in seven slates 
with breaking; a Massuchusells law that 
prohibits (he sale of term papers. The 
schotil said It was the Hrsl federal law- 
suit brought by a university ab<iul the 
online safe of term papers 

The companies said the documents are 
made uvudable liir research only, not (c be 
submitleil us nriginal material. Most have 
disclaimers to that elTcct on their Web mIcs 
and said they also send a written warning 



with the materials thi7 sell. 

IJut BU general counsel Hob Smith 
called the disclaimers inrlTeciivc and said 
other advertising shows that live companies 
knew these papers were intended lo be sub- 
mitted for grades and cre'dil 

Term papers sold to BU were neatly 
printed and ready lo be turned in. Smith 
said. One company, which was not iden- 
lified. offered lo put the siudcnt's name, 
professor's name and course number on 
I he cover sheet 

Smith said HI ofTieials were not aware 
of any sludeni submining a term paper pur- 
chased online The lawsuit seeks a court 
order barring the companies from doing 
business in Massachusetts, unspecified 
ila triages and the seizure of all the term 
j^apcr^, theses or research documents ihcy 
have for sale 

One company ofticial said il was an 
issue ofFirsI Amendment rights 

"It's like if you were given 'War and 
IVace' and use the t'ltfTs Notes." s;iKt 
Robert Viinnti, owner of Professor Abe 



Kom's Term Pit per. School and Business 
I ielp Line, one of the defendants, "There's 
nothing wrong with that." 

C'litTs Notes, published t^ a Lincoln, 
Neb., company, summari/e works of lit- 
eralure They were banned recently at 
Villano\a ['niversily near Philadelphia. 

Like other term paper providers, 
Viirano said he semis his customers a 
warning that ihey shouldn'i submtl the 
work as I heir ctwn. 

"Lveryone ihai calls me. 1 lell ihem if 
they're going lo hand it in as their tiwn 
work that I don't want ihem as a cus- 
tomer." he said. 

The other companies named were A- 
Plus Termpapers of Jersey tity, NJ.; A- 
I Termpapers of West t'heslcr. Pa.; 
H i g h - Pe r for m a nee Papers of 

Milwaukee: Research Assistance of Los 
Angeles; fhe Paper Store I nterprises 
Inc. of Jackson, N.J.; Paper Shack of 
Shrevepori. l.a; and paper/ com of San 
Antonio. Ihey did not reiorn calls or 
declined lo commeni Mtindav 



A- 1 otVcrs liifWi term papers at a 
range of prices, including the 
McCarthy tsm report Custom documents 
cost up lo %}5 a page, plus shipping. 

At the Web sile of paper/com, where 
browsers can find I he paper on moral 
luck, there is the foil owing disclaimer: 

"While the (iray Master Co dims not 
condone ihe suhstiiulion of its products 
tor original research and hard wxirk. we 
irusi our cosiomers lo make their tvwn 
responsible decisions abi>ul Ihe proper 
academic use of our products." 




Standoff 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 

her Otherwise, they've been quiet 

But as the standoff drags on, sympa- 
thies in Allen's wooded neighborhood 
have shifted decidedly in her favor 

Last week, about 1 5(i protesters gath- 
ered in the county seal to demand police 
leave Allen alone. 

Many said it was inhumane for troop- 
ers to cut off her water and pi>wer. par- 
ticularly as tempcralurcs dropped near 
freezing 

A woman was arrested after .she 
sneaked past police barriers and tried to 
sprmi to Allen's door with a bag of gro- 
ceries. 

"It's a surreal experience," She I lie 
Jacobs, one of Allen's net(;hbors. said 




KSU Bakery 
Science Club 

Bake Sale Today 

3 to 5 pm 

SKellenberger Hall 

First Floor 



Jacobs, like residents in about a 
do/cn other houses in the wooded area, 
must check in with irwpers who have 
set up roadbliKks at the enlrances to the 
neighborhood She musi get clearance 
for visiioni. and only recently had her 
family's mail and garbage service 
restored 

"The other day. my 4- year-old said 
'Mommy, when are the policemen going 
lo be out of our yard'" Jacobs said. 

Thai's a question Slate Police 
Director Terrancc (iainer gets asked 
almost dailv lie insists thjt the dozens 



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of troopers and hidden tactical agents 
who rolale duly on the 24-hoiir waleh 
al a cost lo the stale of almost S5(Hl.t>tK) 
so far - wilt stay al it until ihe siandofi' 
ends. 

Gainer conceded that Ihc waitmg 
game and the criticism are fmsiraling. 
Bul he said mental health experts have 
assured him that ihis is ihe way lo bnng 
the slandotTto a peaceful end. 

"W'e are nol in ihis wnman's face," 
(iainer said "We arc there for this 
woman's protection and for the protec- 
tion of her nciuhNirs" 



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Over ,'iO years experience 

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Exp. Udte fjij/00 
►^fisas btau Historical 

Newspaper Section 
''O 6ox 3585 



OcTO«f«23. 1997 
THURSDAY 



society 



± J 



Va 102, No 43 



CATS FACE FAMiuAR nRRiTorrr 

ON OKUHOMA ROAD TRIP 

^ The K-Stata football Imki will sm some fomlliar 
things when it ploys ot Oklohomo thii Soturdoy, ond 
it's not because seven Wildcats coll OkloKomo home. 

See SPORTS, Page 6 



INDEX 

IntodoY^ 

Bfiefi 

Opinion ,.,.. 



K-STATE STUDENT KICKS IT UP 
WITH COUNTRY PERfORMANCIS 

^ nidi Dovli, seniw m feed science and ogttculturol 
technology management, opaned lor Tracy lyrd 

on Oct 3 in Topeko 

See DIVfRSIONS, Poge 9 I 



■.'#■■ h 




HIGH 
lOW 

^aimef Choncp J 
ihoweii tonight 
Rotiiy and coder 

itiil WPfitffnd 



Boeing business boom means bust 



BUSY 
BOftNG 

TURNS 

AWAY 

BILLIONS 

IN ORDERS 



ASWCIATIO MISS 

SHATTLI' Business Is so 
good ai the Boeing C'o, that it's I us- 
inj; money. 

The world's largest manufac* 
turcr of commercial jets is so 
swamped with orders — and is so 
far behind - Ihat it will cost the 
company $2.6 billion in the com- 
ing year. 

Late aircraft deliveries, a lack 
of skilled labor, parts shortages 
and a snarled assemhiy litie have 
resulted frotn an unprecedented 



iticrease m prvxluctiott The proh- 
lein.s will result in a rare loss for 
the third quarter and will hurt 
earnings into next year, the compa- 
ny said Wednesday 

"We knew that we were going 
to have signineani problems in 
ramping up otir production," 
Boeing spokesman Paul Binder 
said. 

The problems will cost Boeing 
about SI. 6 billion before tuxes in 
the third quarter ended Sept. Ml 
suid Phil t ondit. chairman and 
chief c-iccutive. tver if Boeing's 



production recovery plan works, 
he added additiotial disruptions 
will add S I billion in costs through 
IWK. 

The unexpected size of the loss 
sent Boeing's stock tumbling more 
than 7 percent, or by S4 a share, to 
$,S(t Wednesday afternoon on (he 
New York Stock Exchange, drag- 
ging down the Dow Jones industri- 
al average. 

Boeing, which will announce 
its earnings on Friday, will experi- 
ence only Its third quarterly loss in 
the past 25 years. A year ago. it 



earned S254 million in the pcntxl 
In contrast with the current i rou- 
bles, the last loss came two years ago 
as Boeing wiis paying tor an early 
retirement program to cut enipioy- 
mcntby 1 2. iKKt employees 

Biindsided by the sudden turn- 
around in orders, Boeing has hired 
12,()(K( people in the past one and a 
half years. It plans tn hire more. 

Boeing said two weeks ago it 
would halt new production of 747- 
400 jetliners for a month and slow 

See BOfINO, Page 13 



RIGHT, A FUU. MOON 

sets on Friday 

mofninq above the silos 

at ine K-Siote Dai<y 

Reseorch Unit 

BfLOW. RYAN KIFF, 

junior m agfonomy, (eedi 
a Hotsteiri call at the 

K-State doify research 
urvil ReiH milh and feeds 
catrie ot the reseorch unit 

lo help pay histuihon 




Early 



Shift 



SrOSr BY AMY BICKEI • PHOIOS BY JEM C P E S 





Agronomy student relies on background 
in dairy farming to pay for tuition bills 



1(11. k reads 3:30 am The alarm goes 
oti lime to gel up and get at it. 
be grab a e up of eolTee or a p«ip 
ep uwake. 
ile most K-Stalc students are 
at this time. Ryan Rciff. junior 
omy, works on a dairy farm 
a milker at the K-State 
liryr^ 
Twice a week he gets up at early 
hours or milks late into the night to 
help pay his college tuition Besides 
milking, he works a couple of days a 
week feeding the cattle On 
Saturdays, he farms fur a neighbor in 
his homctiwn of Abilene, rounding 
out 25-. 10 hours of work a week 

"It's pretty repetitious," Reiff 
said. "I always enjoy doing it like 
setting up the barn for operation 
just like a piece of machinery." 

This job wasn't ReilV's first time 
to milk a cow Ite milked during high 
school to earn extra money 

"While I was in high school, my 
dad farmed and drove a schmil bus 
on the side lie couldn't afford to 
l^vc me an allowance fur the work I 



did, so I got a Job at a dairy, and I 
liked it," RcilT said 

He used his high school job in 
KKA in the Supervised Occupational 
Educational Program The program 
teaches students to keep records on 
u'hai they did and experiences in 
agriculture. Rei ff worried I H hours a 
week at a dairy plus 10-15 hours on 
weekends doing farm labor. 

ReifT worked in Dickinson 
County until about a year ago when 
one of his fnends who worked at the 
dairy unit told him about the job. 

"He convinced them that I'd be 
good help," ReilTsaid 

The Dairy Unit has about 200 
cows ReilT and another worker milk 
until 10 a.m. They check for cows in 
heat and take care of sick cattle He 
also feeds calves. 

But the Dairy Unit isn't like other 
dairy farms It counts on siudcnU for 
help 

"There's always people visiting 
and classes being held out there," 
ReitT said "It's interesting being 
around the cows They're more used 



to people than cow^s in a normal 
dairy would be." 

Although he likes his job. the 
long hours wear hiin down He bal- 
ances his work scfiedufe whife takmg 
1 7 hours this semester and participat- 
ing in functions with his fraternity, 
,Mpha Gamma Rho. 

"Sometimes I get to doing too 
much — I don't always say 'no,'" 
Rciff said "Especially when helping 
with fall harvest or spring planting 
One night while milking. I opened a 
gate and sent 24 head of cattle all 
over the dairy. You get worn out. 
That's typical farming " 

Unlike other jobs, the dairy bam 
isn't afways prcdictabfc. The cattfe 
need lo be milked even if it's below 
zero out\ide 

The tempcratua- in the milk ham 
can be almost a SO-dcgrec jump from 
the outside air. 

"I've heard stones of people pass- 
ing out It was such a switch." Reiff 
said. "Winters arc interesting. You 

See MIIKINO, Page 12 



"While I was in high school, my dad farmed and drove a school bus on the side. 

He couldn't afford to give me an allowance for the work I did, 

so I got a job at a dairy, and I liked IT." 

K^i \N Kl III, M NIOK IN A(iK(»MiMY 



Resolution; urges 
fraternitiesjto ban 
alcohol in nouses 



AMY UCKU 

*liitT repiirlcr 

The members of the National 
Panhcllenic Conference announced a 
resolution passed Saturday at their annu- 
al meeting that urges Iraleriiiiies on 
campuses across the nation to ban alco- 
hol from their residences, 

NPC IS an umbrella organi/ation for 
26 national stirorities. including 1 1 rep- 
resented at K-Statc These sororities 
operate under a substance- free pohcy 

A study by the Center on .Addiction 
and Substance Abuse at ( oluinhia 
Liniversity found alcohol is a factor in 40 
percent of all academic problems and 2X 
percent of droptiuts 

Three fratemitics. Phi Delta Ihcta. 
Sigma Nu and Phi (iamma IX-lta, voted 
h\ ban afcohofie beverages from iheir 
cantpus residences by the yeat 2(KMI 

"Our responsibility extends beyond 
our houses." Lissa Bradlbrd. chairman 
of NK'. said "Our rcMifulion ^uppl>r1s 
the efforts of several nationaf lratcrnitic\ 
to ban alcohol lirom their bouses and 
refocus these men on a living experience 
centercHJ around friendship, leadership 



aiJd education" 

With tl^ree houses banning alcohol 
from residences. Bradford said she 
thought the m«Hcmcnt should be a con- 
tinuing trend. 

fhe NP( IS encouraging campus 
Panliellenic Councils to support the res- 
olution and encourage chapters to partic- 
ipate in functions with fraternities in a 
\a ler , s ubsl aiu c - t't ee en V i ronnien t 

"This isn't an ailti -drinking resolu- 
tion." she said "VS'e're just pronioling 
leadership and fiigh ideak for men and 
women in these organizations This is a 
beeinning step in tliui dirLiKon " 

Barb Robcl. (ireek .Mf.tirs adviser, 
said the initial decision for K-State sub- 
stanec-free housing was up to the Iraler- 
nities 

"W bile I applaud this resolution, it's 
not much of an impact on how Iraterni- 
ties cfuHise lo go about this issue." Robel 
said 

She said it was loo early to tell what 
results will eiimc from the resolution 

"Wc areju.si laving tfie groundwork 

See DRV, Page 12 




,\nscll Personal 
Products recalled batches 
of three brands of its con 
doms alter discovering that 
some might break. 

Some 57 million eondonis from 
the Lifestyles, Pnmc and C onlempo 
brands were subject to (he recall, 
said the Food and Drug Admimstm- 
tinn. 

"That doesn't mean theri' are 57 
milhon bad condoms." emphasised 
FDA spokeswoman Sharon Snider 

But when New Jersey -bused 
An sell discovered thai stvme con- 
doms could deteriorate before their 
espiration dates, it couldn't predict 
exactly which hatches were al risk. 
So to he safe, it a'called c"very \ari- 
ety in question. Snider said. 

The II).\ ur{!ed consumers to 
check iheir condoms to ensure ihe> 
had not already bought the recalled 
brands 

Consumers may call 
IKOO) KK.1-:i4.14 be- 
tween K a.m. and 5 
pm for more 
information. 




BRANDS RECALLED 

• lifeStyles Uliia Sensitive with 
Spermicide, expiration dote October 
1997 

t lifestyles Assorted Colors with 
Spermicide, expiration doles 
October 1997 ihrough lune 1998 
ff lifestyles SpermicidoHy lubricated, 
expirofion dotei October 1997 
Ihrough October 1998 

• Lifestyles Vibro Ribbed with 
Spermicide and E^ttfo Strength with 
Spermici<ie enpnotion doles 
October 1997 through April 2000 

• Prtme Spermictdaify iLibncated. 
expiration dates October 1997 
through Febmory 2000 

« Contempo Intensity Assorted 
Cobrs with Spermicide, expirottori 
dote Novembei 1997 



SourcB Auocialffd Pt«it 



SCOTT M. UUM)./Cull»9)qn 



Software allows students 
to attend class using Web 



CAfHT MCN 

^tjIT rcfsincr 

The College of Education is using 
Web Crossing to offer Seminar in 
Leadership, a World Wide Web- based 
class, to graduate students this semester 

Web Cros,sing. software created by 
Lundecn and Associates based in 
Alameda, Calif, allows users to ha\e 
discussions from fvjlh local and i litem a - 
lional locations 

This software allows students to post 
messages that other classmates can read 
or respivnd to at any time. 

Tweed Ross, director of Technology 
Services for the College of Fducation. 
^id the software allows his students to 
vM>rk on flexible schedules 

"It creates a elassrtwm environment 
where we can have real discussions in 
asynchrtmous situations," Ross said. 

To participate, students go to the 
College of liducutioii's home page, link 
to Ross" page, find the syllabus with the 
link to FAL »i(t6 and connect with the 
page Then Ihcy type in their name and 
password to discuss the assigned reading 
with Ros&. 



Ross said normally students don't 
give detailed responses quickls when 
communicating with list.serv s or in situ- 
ations when face-to- face contact has not 
been made between participants I le s;iid 
students in this class seem to be com- 
fortable with the software and gave long. 
detailed and responsive mcss;iges soon 
after their initial discussions 

kalhy Nielson. graduate student in 
advanced education, s;od there are many 
advantages to taking the class over the 
Internet She said being an extension 
agent m Lincoln Counts and a mother to 
three children often means her time for 
reading is limited She said classes like 
this one are helpful because they fit into 
het hectic lifestyle. 

"That's the nice part of this class." 
Niels4in said "I can get up aiul read or 
do the chat business before work or late 
at night when I have the tinu'" 

Dave llowey. graduate student in 
education, said as a military otTtcer 
instructor at Fort Leavenworth he want- 
ed t(> sec how K -State would ii.se the 

See WEI, Page 12 



- - 'U 



DEADLINES 

TO PUCE AN rriM 

in the Daily Plorner, 

stop by Kadiie 1 1 6 

ond fill QUI a form 

Of e-mad il to 

by 1 1 Q,m two doyi 
before il is lo run 




KANSAS STATE COLIEGIAN 



MA^4AGING EDiTOt 
MltlOIT 



T H U 




NEWSrewind 

Ns»s Rewind c'ij'tecrs rfie top compui, fcco/, iltate. national ond wof/rf n«ws from (fc« poit iS houri 8f«fi oi» co/taclio 
'ram wire and iloff reporn 



3 men arrested in $1 million 
drug bust in western Kansas 

GARMN CITY, Koo. - Tfitee Gorden City men 
ore in cutlody pending leclerol drug chorges, after 
locol and fwjerol outhontlei seized drugs ond proper- 
ty ifiey valued ol more thon $ ) million 

The houl mcluded 745 pourtds ol monjuano, 
more ttian one pound ol cocoine ond 30 gram$ of 
methomphelamine, police Capl Stan Wofdylali soid. 

Three rnen, whose names were not releoied, 
were orrested Friday after a six- week rnveiligalion 
thot inclwJed city police, Finney Count/ sherilf's offi- 
cers ond tire federol Drug Enforcement Agency. 

Aultiorities olio confiicaled four vehicles, two 
hondguns ond 1 13,000 in cash, Wsidylok soid 

Jury considers whether off-duty 
officer was justified in shooting 

WHITE FUINS, N.Y. - A jury began 
^^fednesday con)i<iering the fole of o police officer 
wfio, while off duty, shot ond kilied a mon wiio 
grobbed a bat during a dtspute over a porliing 
space. 

The defense argued Tuesday thot New York 
City Office* Richord D DiGuglielmo's response wos 
justified, but prosecutors said he was blinded by rage 
when he shot Chorles Compbell three times 

DiGuglielmo, 32, is charged with murder and, 
if convicted, could be sentenced to 25 years to life in 
pfison 

Campbell was shot Oct. 3, 1996, outside the 
DiGuglielmo's fomily deli in Dobbs Ferry He had 
parked m the polronsHjnIy lot before going ocross the 
street for piizo 

Tfve officer's father put o no-porking sticker on 
Campbell's Corvette and a light broke out Compbell 
pulled o bat from tfie cor, hit the lotfver m the knee 
ond wos shot three times by itie son, prosecutors con- 
tend 

Government forces schools to lift 
ban on recruiters by cutting aid 

WASHINGTON, DC - Kenyon College hod 
litHe to lose when it closed its campus lo military 
recruiters in 1992 to protest Pentogon rules borring 
honwiexuols from the armed forces. 



The small, prestfgious Itberol oris college in 
Gombier, Ohio, wos invoked in no Pentagon 
research projecfs, so it felt no pinch when Congress 
voted in i 994 lo deny mililory gfonls ond contracts 
to colleges thot barred recruiters 

Recruiting sergeants are bock now, however, at 
Kenyon and mony olfier campuses that once barred 
them Congress quietfy raised the ante lost year for 
schools thai still kept out the recruiters they could lose 
all thetr federal student aid 

Melissa Krovetz, 19, co-president of a Kenyon 
student group called Allied Sexual Orienlatiorvs, 
called it blockmoil but doesn't Foult the college br 
reversing its stand 

Indiana fraternity suspended for 
racially offensive scavenger hunt 

EtlOOAAINGTON, Ind - A froterntty begged 
for c'lonce to etcpioin oFler il was suspended and 
threolened with expulsion by indiona University for 
sending pledges on a rociolty and ethnically offensive 
scavenger hunt 

A campus fudiciory panel should complete its 
review ol Zeio 6elo Tou's actions within 10 doys, uni- 
versity chancellor Kenneth Gfos Louis said 

The chopter wos suspended by ihe notional tro- 
ternity after it sent pledges on a scavenger hunt lo find 
photos of "2 chicks kissing (less ciolhes, nwre credifl,' 
g midget ord 'any funny-lookm' Mexicon." 

Zela Beta Tau's list 'really offended many groups 
on campus,' Gros louis said 'It olf»r>ded women, 
blocks, gays ond lesbions ll offended the ma|Ofitjf cuf- 
lure" 

Tfte list surfaced when police arrested nine 
pledges lost week on charges of stealing a street sign, 
one of 22 items on the scavenger list. 

^\ yj Srttth'nt 




Finol octkm 

* K^kv^v^^ ol Spttng plfibiK4li of* g>ad^ lytfe^i 

* tyki*! anwndmpnl tjjncwntttq iht d^Ohon oJ lU privilege h* 

* Auit-ci'ifoi-cnrt ol refill I f'vdgm on. itodhitni eafMnMon |50-IK)H 

IntroducHofi of logiilotioo 



(Ti«ewc)«:le 



DAILYplanner 

rh« Dorfy Plonngr :i (he Cothgian > camput bu/biin botnd 
lernce Bemj m thf plonnei can be pubtiihpd up to ttiree 
timet ^> m<^fif nor appeot because o' ipoca constrointi 
but art guatantged ID apptai on rfie Aoy of fhe ochvify h 
ptoct on ttem irop by Krdtif f M and liH out o kxm oi e- 
moji it to 
<:oliK)n9liu tdu by 1 1 am two dayi beton il ii lo run 

* The Craduota ScIkmI has Kheduled the find oral 
defenie ol llie docforol dissertotron of Cesar Guvele for 
2 30 p m todoy m Wotefi 329 

* Ag AmbaiMxiaet will nieel ol 6 tonight m Waters 
137 

* A9 r«pt win meet at 6 tonighl in Waters 326 

* Atpho Phi Omega natiiviol service fraternily will meet 
ot 6 tonight in Union 203 

* Greekt Advoteifng Hm Mofure Mowagerwe w t at 
Akeflttl will mesi nl fi lon.qhi m Union 706 

* Order of Omega Greek Leadership honaroTY »'" 

meet ol 6 tonight ol ttre Alpiic Xi Dvllu torort^ houie 

* The Amerksn Red Creit will hove a wrop^p meeting 
(or ttie Fall Blood Drive ot 7 tonight in Union 204 

* Rotarott Chib will hove K-Slole community service leom 
prewntolioni al 6 30 tonight in Union 206 

* Ttse Deportment of Entomolagy will present speokei 
C Michoel Smilli at ) JO p m lodoy m Wotew 133 
Smilti will disi^kiss molecular morker-directed selection for 
ophid resistance in wheal 

* KIU AikidD will meet at 7 p m every Mor^, 
Wednesdoy ond Fndoy this lemcjler in Aheorn 301 
Begirwiers can ilort at any time 

* Monar leord will oward two $200 Kholarthips to 
jyniQrt Itiis loll Applications, now ovoiloble in the Office 
of StMlent Activities and Services on the ground Hoor of 
ilie K 'Stole Student Union, org due by 5 p m Mondoy 

• ShidMtf Connr Ra*»ordi ftwrwdt of SSOO ore 

jvoibble lor undeigraduale ^rudenii m a heoittt-relat«i 
degree program Appticotions ore available tn Ackert 
413 and ore due by Dec 6 



POUCEblotter 

lepotli ate wten d'recrfy from the K State and tikf County police 
deporlmenli daity togs lA^ do not liil whetl locks or minor troffic 
vfofetion] because of spoce constromrt 

KSTATE 

WEDNESDAY, OO. 33 

• At 10:04 o m , Justin Wrigfey wos orresled on a Johnson 
County warrant and transported to Itiley County Jail Si ley 
County Poltce Deponmeni reported the warront was for crimi- 
nal domoge to property, ond l^e bond was set at $2,000 

RILEYcouNTY 

TUESDAY, Oa. 21 

• At 2 16pm, Thomas J Waffle, 872 S Collins Lone, wos 
arrested for transporting on open container ond possession of 
controlted subslance Bond was set ol (650. 

• Ai 4 10 p.m , TiiwthyM Ryzewski, 2915 Woyne Drive, 
was arrested lot rape and aggravated sexual boDery Bond 
was set al $ 1 ,500. Lt. Rodney Joger said the vtcltm was o 
Manhattan resident ond knew Ryiewski He soid no alcohol or 
drugs were invofved fHe added thai the rape was reported 
ond on investigation led lo Ryzewski's orrest 

• Al 8 03 p m , Steven A Jurik, 2944 Keals Ave , was orrest- 
ed on a (!il«y County warrant for worthless cfvecks Bond was 
setaiS200 

WEDNESDAY, OC. 22 

• Al 7 37 a m , B»ion J Droge, 3924 Snowy Reach, wos 
arresled for possession ol drug paraphernalia at Manhattan 
High School 

• Al 9 04 am,, Melissa Horgis, 300 N Fifth Si , was arrest- 
ed on worront for worthless checks. Bond was set ol J50 

• Al 2:52 p m , Bradley Templelon, Topeko, wos orrested on 
Riley County worront lor failure to oppeor hie was releosed 
on 1500 bond. 

• Al 4:12 pm , Michael E Robinson, Fort Riley, was orrested 
on o Riley County warrant for wortftless checks Bond was set 
al}200 



M^ 



lii:^m 



IONS 

Sometime) ttie Collegion inokas o mistoka If a muhiie octurt, contact jiH 
Story, monoging editor, by phone |33245S6|, by e-mail 
coUegnAsu edu or by stopping by ifve Collegian at ICediie 1 16 




164' 

10Mf;45' 

fOMT 

Breezy attd 
wartncr wHft o 
south wind of 
1 5 10 25 mph. 
knigfti, a 30- 
percenl chance 

For showen. 



Cbolar, with 
chotKts for 

rain. 

oMSh 

■YPHOM 

Newwdom 
512-MM 

Advhtising 

ClASSIfCDS 

S32-U5S 

lYE-MAM. 

CCXlfONftiU.EOO 

■YMAH 

Kansas StAT! 

COUifMH 

Keos 116 

KAMSASSTATf 

LlNtvt«sm 

MANMAtTAN, KS 

66506 
MKIISON 

TWCOUEGIAN 
»CWS«00MtSf4 

lAOOSSnCM 

SnixNi Uncnj. 



Tfw Koniai Slota CotUgian lUSPS 291 020), a studani newspaper at Kansas Stole Uniwrsily, Is publlsfied by Studeni Publications ItK , Kedzie 1 03, MonttcMon, Kon. 66506 The CoHegion is published weekdoyt durmg the Khooi year and twice a Mneek through the sumrrvet 
Ifeiodical posiogi" is paid at Mrinhotion Kon 66502 flOSTMASTFB Send oddrsss changes to Konsos State Collegon, cuculoiion desk. ICedzie 1 03, Monholton. Kon. 66506-71 67 C ICv6« SwiF CotfGMN, }Q97 



^ 




HEALTH PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL FAIR 

Thursday, Oct. 23, 1997 
lOa.m.-Sp.m. 




Communication Science and Disorders: 

Kansas Slate Uiiivcr-sity 

University of Kansas 
Dentistry: 

University of Nebraska 
Dental Hygiene: 

Wichita State University 
Dietetics and Nutrition: 

University of Kiinsas 
Health Information Management: 

Stephens Collef»e 

University of Kansas 

Washburn University 
Medical Technology: 

Hays Patholoiiy I^iboratorles 

Kansas Newman College 

North Kansas City Hospital 

University of Kansas 

Wichita State University 
Cytotechnology: 

University of Kansas 
Nuclear Medicine Technology: 

Kansas Newman College 
Medicine: 
Allopathic: 

University of Kansas 
Chiropractic: 
Clea viand Chiropractic College 
Logan College of Chlropractlcs 



Osteopathic: 

Klrksvillc College 

University of Health Sciences 
(Kansas City) 
Nursing: 

Baker University 

Bethel College 

Central Missouri State University 

Creighton University 

Fort Hays State University 

Kansas Newman College 

Manhattan Area Technical College 

•*MtdAmerlca Nazarene University 

Pittsburg State University 

Research College of Nursing 

St. Lukes College 

University of Kansas 

Washburn University 

Wichita State University 
Nurse Anesthesia: 

University of Kansas 
Occupational Therapy: 

Creighton University 

Kansas Newman College 

Rockhurst College 

University of Kansas 
Optometry: 

Northeastern State University 

(Oklahoma) 



Southern College 

University of Missouri-St. I^ouis 
Pharmacy: 

Creighton University 

University of Kansas 

University of Missouri-Kansas City 
Physical Therapy: 

Creighton University 

Rockhurst College 

University of Kansas 

Wichita State University 
PT Assistant: 

Washburn University 
Physician Assistant: 

Wichita State University 
Radiology /Radiation Therapy: 

Kansas Newman College 

Washburn University 
Respiratory Care: 

Kansas Newman College 

University of Kansas 

Washburn University 
Scholarship Ihrograms: 

US Air Force Health Professions 

U.S. Army Health Care 

The U.S. Navy 
Veterinary Medicine: 

Kansas State University 



Sponsored by the College of Arts & Sciences * Health Profession Advising Office 532-6900 



„>l 



THURSDAY, OCTOMR 23, I«7 



KANSAS STATE COILEOIAN 



THi K-STATI 

OREIK population 

neot+y lilleb McCain 

Audiliorium on 

W»dneidoy rig hi to 

listtn to Will Kttim 

jpeok at on olt-grMk 

chapter meeting 

Koim ipoke obout 

academics, sexual 

rttponiibility, hazing, 

alcohol and drugs 

reloting to grMJt lifv 

JNf COOMR 





ANOfU MICCMtOttl 

^|^^rl rcpnrtci 

Greek students got a cKance (o real- 
t/.e (heir opportunities and way<i ihcy 
could improve Iheir lives at last nights' 
all -greek chapter ma'ting 

"How great could you be, if you real- 
ly began to think of youriielf and your 
potential?" Will Keim, moiivalional 
guest lecturer, asked 

Keim. who has a doctoralc in educa- 
tion, spoke for the Intcrrraternil) 
Council and the Panhellenic Council's 
first all greek chapter. He discussed 
ways they could improve the nise Ives and 
(he greek community 

"Male and female, black and uhite 
greeks - we're in (his together We're 
only as strong as our weakest chapter on 
this campus. We have to lake care of 
each other," Keim said 

With (he increase of alcohol-related 
deaths, Keim said greek chapters all 
over the eoun(ry are m danger of being 
eliminated and the only way to protect 
greek org3niza(ions is to practice their 
standards. 

"1 want you (o do what you said you 
would do the night you were miiiated. 1 
want you new pledges, and associate 
members and anybitdy interested, to do 
what you said you wuuld do What the 



fraternities ajid sororities stand for." he 

said 

"\M''ve got to preserve i( We've gol 
10 strengthen it. We've gol to grow it, but 
we can't do ii with people sitting on their 
butts," Keim said 

Keim said there were 10 things 
greeks could do to improve as individu- 
als and as greek communities. 

Academics was the first thing stu- 
dents have to be concerned with in order 
lo succeed as students and greek mem- 
besr (io lo class and take notes, he said 

"You need to study. Here's ho* (o 
study (io to the library during the day 
between classes. I want you to sit in the 
front rou and take notes. 1 want you to 
take your notes home every day and re- 
copy them m outline form," he said. 

Along with studying, students need 
to tocus on being community servants, 
working with other organizations on 
campus ai\d upholding their personal 
character 

"I want you lo he men and *omen of 
character Say what you mean and do 
what you sav and when you don't, admit 
II." he said 

Students need to be sexually respon- 
sible, stop ha/ing and he independent of 
drugs and alcohol, Keim said. 

"It's one of (he big dilTcrenccs 



between being a student when I was in 
sch<^H)l and nou. is v^c could nnl kill our- 
selves With sex." he said. 

With the danger of pregnancy and 
sexually transmitted diseases, students 
are at high risk The only waj to be safe 
is to be responsible, he said. 

Along with being a responsible per- 
son, students also need to thank their 
parents for their suppt>rt and lake time 
for exercise and eontcmplatmn or prayer, 
he said. 

The I (Hh and final thing all students 
should remember to do is try lo be their 
best, he said. Only you will know if you 
did your besi and you're the one who 
will have to live with it. Keim said. 

Barb Rohel, (ireck Affairs adviser, 
said the preseniniion was a step beyond 
the traditional (ireek I (I I for new mem- 
bers. 

"It's just an extension of Greek 101. 
We wanted to give everyone a chance lo 
hear his presentation because he's such a 
dynamic speaker." she said. 

The gathering was also developed to 
bring Ihc greek houses (oge(hcr. 

"1 (h ink it's really great for everyone 
to come together. I'd like to try and do it 
again." Jennifer (iormun, Panhellenic 
president, said 



a 



Show Your PURPLE PRIDE as the 
Cats take on #1 2 Texas A&M on 

Friv OcJL 24 at 7 p.m. 

Then come out 

at., Oct.25 

as the Cats 
ittle #9 Texas 

at 7 p.nri. 



Aheam Fieldhousc 

Admission is FREE 

w/ Student ID 



mm 



Proposal could raise student health premiums 



RUtMU potmtvu 

Kninr iitifl writer 

If the slate administration 
department's proposal for 
state-offered student health 
insurance is authorized, pre- 
miums could rise for all carri- 
ers of K-State's student health 
insurance plan 

The Student Health 
Advisory Committee met 
Wednesday to discuss next 
luesday's Festival of Health in 
the K-State Student Union, 
upcoming privilege fee con- 
cerns, and lo learn more about 
the stale proposal for student 
health insurance 

Lannic Zweimillcr, direc- 
tor of Lafene Health Center, 
updated the committee on (he 
state proposal to offer student 
health, which would be done 
through an administrative reg- 
ulation with no legislative 
approval necessai^ 

The insurance plan was 
proposed af^er graduate stu- 
dent assistants at the 
University of Kansas union- 
ized and demanded to he cov- 
ered by stale health insurance 

Zweimiller said there 
aren't too many specifics 



about the possible plan avail- 
able at thispomi. 

"It appears it is going for- 
ward." Zweimiller said, "We 
are looking at finding out 
exactly what the components 
of that plan would be." 

The potentially higher pre- 
miums are owed the fragmen- 
taiion of (he health insurance 
population, Zweimiller said 

For example. K-State 
receives a lower rate on insur- 
ance now. thanks in part to the 
large number of students who 
take (he insurance. 

If a percentage of those 
students were lo take the 
state's proposed plan instead, 
it would lower the total group 
amount for both plans and 
could raise premiums on both 
sides. 

"That's a concern wc have 
1 don't know if it's real or not," 
Zweimiller said. 

■Another issue Zweimiller 
has with the slate plan is that it 
would take the students out of 
the decision prwess. 
Currently, SHAC helps to for- 
mulaic the health insurance 
offered by Lafene based on 
student needs. 



A s late- olTe red plan would 
bcsetal the stale le^el. 

"Now students arc 
involved in designing the 
plan," Zweimiller said "If you 
remove that lo another level, 
you're potentially removing 
thai student imolvement." 

Lafene also faces prepar- 
ing for a privilege fee review 
this year The student fee pays 
for operating costs, enuipmeni 
purchases and salaries 

M SHAC's Nov 5 meet- 
ing, ils fee review subcommit- 
tee will present a proposed fee 
package to the entire SHAC 
body for rev icw 

Passat • of the fee proposal 
will occur at the Nov. 12 
SHAC meeting After pas- 
sage within SHAC, the fee 
will proceed to the Student 
Senate Privilege Fee 
Commiitee 

in addition. Julie Tarara. 
SHAC chair. ret(uesied volun- 
teers to help with next week's 
festival of Health The 
Festival of Health, where 
Lafene 's services will set up in 
Union Courtyard, will occur 
from HI am. to 2 pm. 
Tuesday 



r NMd moce inwT 

Th« Studeni Heolit> 
AdviiOty Comn^'ltce 
will metl next a' 
i\bpm cm No« 
5 in ll» LoW 
Haalih Zv*ti cocv 
feftrtcerooffi 



RCPD arrests ex-Haymaker resident for possession 
of drugs with intent to sell in August incident 



AfmUCOMV 

tcn.K>r itiir vk met 

A man who might be a K-State 
student was arrested Wednesday 
morning for possession with intent to 
sell LSD. 

Lt. Rodney Jager of the Riley 
County Police Department said 
Tobias M. Hathom was arrested at 
10:32 a.m. Wednesday, atk*r an inci- 
dent on Aug i I that led to a criminal 
investigation. 

The original incident involved a 
report (o the RCPD that a man had 
jumped through glass and was found 
running naked through the streets 
near Ninth and Kearney streets. 

Jager said the man was found lo be 
under the inlluence of drugs Ikcause 
Jager was not sure whether the man 
had been arrested, he wouldn't release 
his name, but would say the man was 
not Haihofn 



Jager said the incident launched a 
criminal investigation by RCPD. 
Facts from the invest igalion were col- 
lected and forwarded to the Riley 
County attorney's olTice A judge 
signed a warrant for Hathorn's arrest 
and set the bond at S5.()Wf 

Hathom posted bond Wednesday 
afternoon and was released. 

Haihorn was a resident of 
Haymaker Hall last year and the early 
pan of this year, Todd Clark, resi- 
dence life coordinator for Haymaker 
Hall, said 

Clark said Hathom was evicted 
from his nnim at Haymaker because 
he was suspected to he m possession 
of a controlled substance, though he 
said he couldn't remember the exact 
date It happened 

"In ihe contract it states that any- 
one cons icled or accused of a crime. 



that their contract can fall under 
rev lew." Clark said. 

"We ditn't meddle with prosecu- 
lion. our burden of proof is a prepon- 
derance of c\ idence " 

Clark said he thought Hathom was 
definitely afl'ected by the situation 
and that he had been working with 
'Haihorn. 

■'I've been working wiih him on 
the judicial side and the counseling 
side." he said. 

It could not be determined before 
press time whether Hathorn was a stu- 
dent, because the Registrar's Office 
was closed According to the Campus 
[liredory, he was a sophomore in 
architeclure at the beginning of the 
semester 

.An attempt to contact I lalhom lor 
com mem was made, but he was 
unavailable 



You mleeed the 0ame to work the conceeelon etand. 

You spent your Saturday cleaning the highway. 

You etud'ied hard to make that honorars/. 

Get Recognized! 

More than 250 organizations make K-StEte great. 
Make sure your group is in tlie 1998 Royal Purpla 




These organizations are scheduled 
to have their pictures taken on 

Friday, October 24 



Organizations can still sign up for 

group pictures in Kedzle Hall 105. 

There is a $15 charge for each 30 people. 



Pictures will be taken in McCaiti 324. 
The Royal Purple yearbook can be purchased at this time for $24,95, 

Schedule an appointment for your orqamzatlori in 103 Kedzle for $15. 
Yi3u can aleo get a sound byte for the CD-ROM supplement for $5, 



1^ 



^jffuTlo 

^TR OVAL 



Contact the Royal Purple at: 

Itll Kediie HjII 

(7HS) ^^2'h'>Sl. rp(a'kiu.«-du 

h ttp : / / w%¥w. ipub. k lu .edu / r p / 



9^ 

'purple 




OPINION fDIIiV* 
MUNHHiinO 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1997 



OURview 

Oor Vitw, an edilortal 
selecied ond debated 
bf tKe sditoriol bcxird, 
is wriHtn oW a 
nio,|(»ily opinton ri 
brmed The edilorid 
board conittit of 
Collegian edrlori and 
other staff member] 
Our View [} the 
Collegian's aflicial 
opinion 



Wildcat fans should exhibit class on the road as well as at home 



National coverage Dccidci of 
doinitiancc Hctsman Ttophy 
winners. Dcvutcd fan>i. 
All these things are (.hiiraetciiNtits of llic 
Wildcat tool ball icam'^ next opponent , the 
Oklahoma Socmen 

However, for the past four years, none of 
these things have been a factor whun the two 
Icains met. 

The Cats arc going to Norman this week- 
end with every intention of extending their 
winning streak to five seasons. 

Those of you planning to take a road tnp 



In Oklahoma, beware The Sooner fans could 
he hostile, especially if you follow the logic 
that K-Statc won the recruiting buttle over 
several prominent freshmen and junior trans- 
fer linebacker JetT Kelly 

Al last year's Nebraska game al KSlf 
Stadium, llusker l-back and niilivc Kansan 
[)eAngelo Itvans was booed because he chose 
to go north with the Huskcrs. 

Kelly and the Cats could face the same 
chilly reception Saturday at Oklahoma's 
Memonal Suidium 

As a loyal Cat fan, i I would be eany to be 



drawn into spirited discussion with the sur- 
rounding Sooner Cans. 

Hut don't »ii(«»p to their level Sh(*w the 
class thai Texas A&M fans who allended last 
week's game have commenied on since they 
left the Little Apple, 

Many Aggies populated Aggieville bars 
and restaurants throughout the weekend. 
Although they lost the buttle un the I'lelil they 
left Maiihuilun with smiles and stones to tell 
their friends in College Station 

II you'd like io go m Norniun to support 
the (ills, contact the Union Program Council 



at 532-657! For $70, fans receive a ticket, 
tninsporlalion and lodging The deadline for 
signing up is today. 

If you're already going, remember to wrar 
your purple and help make a formidable force 
in the 75,(IUU-scat stadium. 

But whatever you do, don't give the 
Sooner- loyal any reason to dispute the fact 
ihul K-Statc has the classiest fans around 

Wiih the No 14 team in the country. Cat 
funs have a lot to be proud of 

Don't give the Sooncrs a reason Io think 
olherwisc 



EDboard 






riSkxr 



con (Mr 



Srdndi ^^^ 



W Dm Mil 

iwnwtfNcn 



CAMPUtOOV. 

fINTOt 

CA«WffniTOI 

onrnKM 



CUPdMwj 



Idtua 

OtMHKtlHtM 



Ktif f^fiv^ 



liaAfQi/fiwi 



STAR WAR 




ff NEW HOPE 

Act 6: Justice Attacks $c*n« 3 
Having invoded Darth Gales' fortrei s in Redmond, WasK 

Princess Janet Reno and Ralph Obi-Wan Nader se1 

out the evil overlord's private chambers. As tKS 

scene opens, our heroes, along with their 

robot sidekick NS3eO, are searching 

the bastion, attempting to avoid Gotes^ 
flannel-clad, espresso-driven Raintroopers. 




WELCH 

MtUvi^KHi You can Mnd yow *-fnOil 

toWv<Ki«i.i#i5«»«dy 



Nader: We're running out of time (iaies already has eontrol of the com- 
puters If he gets the Internet, the rebellion is lost If you had only gotten to 
Ibis sooner, we would have had more lime 

Reno: Lock. I've been busy with (icn Clinton's "eufTccs" with the 
Gtxidarian [empire and the Rebel High Couneil. so back ofT No one asked 
you to come along anyway, press-bound 

Nader: (Squatting behind a wall and llnng subpoenas at a passing cadre 
of Raintroupersi I'm not m this for the press, but for the people 

Reno: And the presidency'^ 

Nader: { Fixes Reno widi a glare, then, with a wave of hiit hand uses a Jcdi 
mind tnck. whispering) I'm in this for the people 

Reno: I A da7ed look spreading across her face, her voice sounding far- 
away \ You're in this for the people. 

Nader: Good. Now let's go. 

(Nader, Reno and NS_VO dash across a courtyard, into a dtmrway then into 
a room. The room is dark ciieept for a computer system's monitor, which flick- 
ers against a wall. The computer system is huge. 25 gigabytes of memory or 
more lie within its 4-l6ol-tall tower ) 

Reao: This must be it, the heart of lechn4)logieal darkness. 

Nader: ( Shudders) We've got to find Gates before he finds ut. 

Gatci: I From behind) Too late. 

( Nader and Reno spin around to face the diminutive prince of evil Gates 
looks back and forth between Rervo and Nader The moment crackles with 
their intense mutual dislike. NS3 beeps funously and then goes "offline," 
slumping against a wall.) 



Galet: I 'm hi glad that you've cmne to visit, Obi-Wan, Princess Reno. 
Nader: [Xw't try to swccl-talk as. Gates Vour tyranny is at an end 

t 

Reno: (Holding a paper above her head) I have a charge of civil contempt 
here for you, "Lord" Gates The Alliance wants you to slop unlawfully taking 
advantage of your Windows monopoly to protect and oitend that monopoly 
and undermine consumer ehoicc 

(Gates raiiics a hand and the paper (lies to it ) 



Gales: iNonchaluntly lixiking at the paper) The people have had a choice. 
Princess, and they've chosen Windows (He raises ihc paper Io his face. snifTs 
it and then looks slyly at Reno ) Y<iu wrote this on Microsoft Word didn't you.' 

Reno: (Shc-epishly mumbling) It came as pan of a giwernment contract 

Nader: Dtin't try to change the subject, tiaies' Reno here is prepared to 
line you SI million a day if you don't cease and desist your practices 

(iatei: (Sarcastically) 1 guess in about 2(1 years I would be out of money, 

wouldn't r.' 

Nader: ( Ignoring the remark ) She's also asking a judge Io sinke di»wn your 
mm-disclosurc statemenls with the Compaq, fiatcN^ay and Acet empires no 
that we can see what kind of deals you've K'en making 

fiatei: (His anger griiwing) You'll never do it* fhcy allied with the empiie 
of their own volition and their contracts are tighter than Aldebarian hoi pants! 

Reno: Your evil empire is drawing to a close. Gates! 

Gates: ( Regaining his composure) ( )n the contrary, my dear princess, it is 
about to be reborn TiKlay we launch our uliimate weapiin! 

Natter and Reno: The Micn)<toll Death Starf 

Gaitt: Better Windows n. 

Nader and Reno: (Screaming) Nooooo' 

((iates laughs wickedly, his laughter growing louder as the scene ends ) 

Seene 3: 

(Rebel Generals Al tiore and Bill Clinton have hxn watching this tableau 
unfold on their MPFG video viewer within their secret bunker The Gondarian 
Ambassador and his aides are having cofl'ee in one corner, discussing the back 
pain the ambassador got from slei-ping m the bunker's Sky walker Hcdroom ) 

Gore: I was just thinkmii something, (ieneral 

CliDlon; That this is very bad news? 

Gore: No. .()iis voice lowers to a whisper and he leans toward Clinton's 

ear) .we have got to learn that /edi mind trick thing 

(Clinton mxls thmightfully) 



VOLUNTEER 



earn a se 



evement 




M A ) t D 

KHAr.' 

UN it a ^oduiie iK 

cdn i»fid tmoil Io MD|*d a* 



Volunteerism in America is as old as those immigrants 
who first arnved at 1. 1 1 is Island more than a century ago The 
immigrants came, as they still do. with a hope and a dream 
And from the old country, they broughl a strong sense ol 
community When they lamled at the fiMii of Manhattan 
Island they encountered a new ciced "\olunleerism " 

As a new American, one was enpectcd Io be a "rugged 
individual " Itut. in this land of ^asi frontiers and small gtn - 
ernmcni. you were also expected to "help thy neighbttr" and 
to volunteer 

I think this is a tradition in this country. Those better ol) 
arc eiipceted to do stimethin^ lor those less lortunatc 1 hat is 
part tif our history 

Tlicre IS not a shortage o( volunteers whti want to gi\e 
their time to society For those who don't have the time, there 
are always financial donations. Ihe genius of American sup- 
port tor volunteerism and charity is that you can do gimtl and 
also save money through tax deductible contributions 

Contributions by wealthy individuals arc not cnmigh 
Atkr all. how many wealthy individu:iK are willing lo sup 
port our communities'' l~hc idea of the private citi/cn doiiij; 
more should be emphasi/cd 

The .\nterican experience has shown that volunteerism 
has and can provide much ftir those who need help, but not 
everything. If the same goc-s 
for the government, what do 
we do/ 

The answer, not surpris- 
ingly appears to be a mix a 
t»alance between government, 
nonprofit organizations and 
individuals (volunteers) The 
question is uhcther we are liv- 
ing in an era of balance or of 
abandonment 

l.xpcrts tell us that pcople 
volunteer their time and tal- 
ents for a vanety of reasons 
The desire for alfiliation. to 
work with others, to receive 

recognition and alTirmation, and to attain that deep-down 
scn.sc of achievement which comes from a job will I dime are 
all important factors. 

Whatever the motivation, each year hundreds of thou- 
sands of individuals call to ask "How can I be a volunteer.'" 
The following arc just a few of the many ways you, as a vol- 
unteer, con make our commonny a belter place lo live. 
Typically, there are already national nonprofit organizations 
who support these causes 

• Ik an adult role model and friend to a child whii needs 
you 

• Fncouragc your community organization to adopt a 
highway to keep litter u(T the roadways 

• Tutor a child Help a teacher or perform tasks that help 
schools run smoothly 

• Deliver nutritious meals to bomebound elderly perstms. 

• Crei trained to be a crisis intervention volumeer. an 
em pathetic listener and meet the challenges of a 24 -hour cri- 
sis hot line 

• Learn conflict resolution skills as a small claims nn'di- 
alor vulunleer 

• Do you love horses' There are usually rettrenwiii honws 
for horses that need volunteer groomers 

• Help raise the money needed to lund Iwal iKalili and 
human service organizations, or help decide how that money 
will be used 

As you can sec, there are vast opp«)rt unities available for 
volunteers. Usually, training is provided by organ iz at i oils for 
free, and the valuable skill attained is original 

There arc many other volunteer positions itHi numerous to 
UsI here Communities should have volunteer centers to 
allow easy access for their residents to develop leadership 
skills 

I personally also had the pleasure lo assist AIDS victims 
and do volunteer work al ItKal hospitals This lias increased 
my confidence and also given me an oppt>rtunity to meet dif- 
ferent people fnvm dilTerent professions The personal satis- 
faction I get in volunteering has given me an upportuntty to 
use my talents in a wide network of fields, 



READERSwrite 

Funding priorities need 
to be examined 

l.dilor, 

I think that we all should take a close 
and scriou.s look at funding pnoritics at 
K-Stalc In the past year, even as Hale 
Library was completed plana for the 
gutting of periodicals from its interior 
continued As the admini.stration was 
pressed by students and faculty alike to 
end the cutM, the response was less than 
enthusiastic 

In fact, administration ofTiciah 
seemed more adept at finding reasons 
for cutting the amouni of journal! and 
penodials in our library than wilting to 
actively seek concrete tolutions to a 



problem that will not go away. 

Yet, in tbe midst of such a significant 
unresolved problem, it is suddenly 
announced that the Department of 
Intereollegiate Athletics plaas lo expand 
KSU Stadium And they want to use a 
new student fee. And by golly, they 
want it to happen fust. 

The K-Staie Athletic Director Max 
lirick recently announced that he would 
like a referendum to occur by mid- 
November, and he wants to travel to 
campus and greek housing to explain the 
expansion. Did anybody notice such 
dectstveness on the part of administra- 
tion offtciala in addreiiing the needs of 
the library 'f 

Hat the president or provofi come 
by your house to drum up your support 



to put some heart and soul into our beau- 
tiful new library' Don't hold your 
breath, folks. 

The importance of keeping research 
journals and periodicals in the library ii 
obvious to the students and faculty, but 
perhaps we have not spoken loud 
enough We need to put this stadium 
expansion on hold, at least until the 
same son of energy, motivation and 
innovation used to promote athletics and 
to stage super Foundation tiind- raising 
events are exhibited toward the very 
foundatitm of our umversjly - our 
library 

Rob MaeDougalt 
senior in social work 



May field ihould be left 
Of»n by Memorial Stadium 

Editor. 

Count me among the many pn^f- 
nents for maintaining a significant 
amount of play field and open space 
!H)uth of Ahearn Field House. This area 
IS heavily used by club sjsorts and area 
residents and offers a scenic respite from 
the otherwise fully developed Anderson 
Avenue 

I don't have a particular alfinity for 
the old stadium, even though ii was con- 
atrueted as a memorial It ^ just a matter 
of time before tbe elements take their 
toll and the detenation progresses to an 
unattractive, unsafe state 



A gmnt architect ought to be able to 
incorporate the stonework into a very 
satisfactory memonal replacement at 
Ihe site, as pedeiitrian entrances to the 
new stadium ot into the design of the 
new alumni center 

It IS the green space that the old sol- 
dier stands watch over that I'm concerned 
about. AOer all, ttie memorial's signifi- 
cance docs not lie with the fans' seating 
area, but in the turf The turf is the sym- 
bolic battlefield on which athletes, like 
the soldiers they represent, struggled 

I am greatly concerned that intde- 
qiMite vision is being used in the contem- 
plation of the KSU Alumni Association's 
propos«l facility, relative to both the 
affected urea and the community While 
it may be easier to build a new buildiiig 



on the Hat, open site at the s^nilh end of 
the old suidium, the cost to ihus commu- 
nity in lost quality of life is prohibitive. 
Instead I'd like to challenge the 
architects to develop an award-winning 
design of space that truly is a gatc-way 
and showcase to the community. It 
should incorporate the historical and 
memorial elements of the site, the need 
for parking, a new alumni center, 
replacement headquarters for entities 
now using the stadium and quality open 
areas and play spaces 

Sid Stevensori 

ussislani professor in the Department of 

Horticulture, Forestry and Recreation 

Reifourees 



THUMMir. OCTOBtR 23, 1997 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Clinton proposes plan to reduce effects 
of global warming over next 20 years 




Clinton 



AStOCUnD MUtt 

WASHINGTON In a 

decision falling short of cnvi- 
mnmentalisls' hopes and his 
own promises. President Clinton 
presented a modest strategy 
Wednesday to eombai global 
warming by gradually reducing 
greenhouse gases over the next 
two decades. 

"Make n<i nustake. the pnib- 
lem is real." the President said. 
"And if we do not change 
our course now, the conse- 
quences sooner or later 
will be desiruclive for 
America and tor the 
world" 

A tier months of fierce 
<.l(.-hatc within the adminis- 
[ration. I'linton announced 
a plan embracing binding 
pollution curbii for the 
first lime But they ar« 
substantially below targets 
proposed by European 
nations and recommended by 
environmentalists. 

The plan calls for reducing 
carbon diojcidc and other hcat- 
tiBppmg gases to 1440 levels by 
the five-year penod of 2008 to 
2012. In (he five years after that, 
the goal IS to reduce cmis.sions 
bekw the I WO mark. 

"Since it s a long-term prob- 
lem requiring a long-term solu- 
tion, il will be phased in over 
time." Clinton said in a speech 
at the National Geographic 
Society headquarters. 

Anxiously awaited by global 
negotiators. Clinton's proposal 
came under swift attack at U.N ■ 
sponsored talks among 1 50 coun- 
tries seeking a consensus on 
mandatory cutbacks in grcett- 
house gases. 

"Something much more sub- 
stantial will need to come out of 
the While House if the United 
Slates IS to face up to its global 
responsibilities." said Peter 
Joergensen, environ mental 
spokesman for the European 
Commission 

Greenpeace, the mtemation- 
a) environmental group, said, 
"This is the 'Black Wednesday' 
for the climate negotiations " 
4if ■ NoM meeting in Gerntany, 
the negotiators are struggling to 
reach a global climate agree- 
ment in time for a December 



conference in Kyoto, Japan 

Clinton alsopmposed S 5 bil- 
lion in tux breaks over the nxw 
five years to spur U.S. industry 
to adopt energy efficiencies and 
develop new technologies that 
would reduce Amenea's reliance 
on fossil fuels even before an 
international treaty goes into 
effect 

in the United States, many 
environmentalists complained 
that Clinton's policy was too 
weak, and many critics on the 
other side warned it would raise 
energy prices and wipe out jobs 

"It's a minimum starting 
point. It will not go nearly far 
enough to get us out of harm's 
way," said John Adams, execu- 
tive director of the Natural 
Resources Defense Council, 

On the other hand, House 
Majority Whip Tom [)cLay, R- 
Texas, said Clinton "has decided 
(hat the debate on global warm- 
ing is over and that we have to 
do something about it That 
something will likely lead to 
higher taxes, more regulatmn.s 
and a bigger government pres- 
ence in our lives." 

The President acknowledged 
"I know full well that some will 
criticize our targets and timeta- 
bles as too ambitious and, of 
course, others will say we 
haven't gone far enough " 

Clinton was accompanied by 
Vice President A I Gore, who has 
made the environment his top 
pnority. The success or failure 
of Clinton's policy could have a 
significant effect on Gore's 
presidcniiul aspirations. 

Gore called Clinton's speech 
"a historic announcement" and 
said it would be regarded as the 
moment "when we really began 
to solve the most serious envi- 
ronmental problem we face." 

Clinton's proposal would 
provide credits for industries 
that make early emission reduc- 
tions. It also envisions an inter- 
national emissions trading pro- 
gram that allows companies and 
nations to swap credit for pollu- 
tion abatement activities. 

The president also said thai 
developing countries "must be 
engaged" in the solution. 

Four years ago. Clinton 
sketched out an ambitious goal 
to reduce emissions to their 



IQOfl le\cls by the year 2(XK) 
through voluntary reductions 
lie said that "regrettably, most 
of us, including especially the 
United Stales, fell short " 

Clinton and Gore warned 
that there is compelling evi- 
dence emissions of greenhouse 
gases arc warming the planet, 
causing severe weiither changes 
such as llmids and droughts and 
spreading disease to areas once 
toil cold for germ-carrying 
insects 

European nations propose 
that all developed nations 
reduce gas emissions to 1 5 pcr- 
cem below 1440 levels by 2010. 
Japan has propcised a 5 percent 
cut, which the Kl' has called 
insufficient 

Administration officials said 
their own goal was not achieved 
because the economy was more 
robust than expected. Oil prices 
were lower and Congress did 
not approve funds that Clinton 
sought for fuel elTicieney and 
renewable energy programs. 

While warning of dire conse- 
quences of global warming, 
Clinton suggested the solutions 
were simple. 

"Most of the technologies 
available for meeting this goal 
through market mechanisms are 
already out there," he said. "We 
simply have to take advantage of 
them" 

He cited the case of a sixth- 
grade class in West Branch, 
Iowa, that used classroom 
experiments to cut their school's 
energy use by 70 percent. 
Similarly, he said that if 
.Americans would buy only 
high-energy products, "we 
could shnnk our energy bills by 
a total of about $ 1 IX) billion over 
the next 15 years and dramati- 
cally cut greenhouse ps emis- 
sions." 

Treasury Deputy Secretary 
Lawrence Summers descnbcd 
Clinton's approach al a W'hite 
House briefing as "a helping 
hand approach rather than a 
heavy-handed approach to 
working to reduce energy con- 
sumption. It doesn't prov ide for 
mandated increases in prices on 
energy over the next decade and 
It docs contain a number of pro- 
visions that arc likely to reduce 
energy costs." 



F-16, trainer jet collide over Mojave Desert; 2 killed 



ASMXtATIP rtits 

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, 
Calif A training jet collided with an 
F-16 fighter Wednesday over Edwards 
Air Force Base and crashed in the 
Mojave Desert, killing two crewmen, 
one British and one American. 

The F-16, with two Americans 
aboard, landed safely on a dry lake bed 
at the base The crew tnemben* were not 
hurt. 

The T-38 Talon is a two-seat training 
jet used by pilots to learn supersonic 
techniques, aerobatics, formation and 
navigation. The crewmen one from 
the U.S. Air Force, and one from the 
Royal Air Force - were killed. 

Edwards is in Southern California 
and home to the Air Force Test Pilot 
School The planes were taking part in a 



practice bombing run h> a B- 1 B 
bomber 

The collision comes weeks after 
Defense Secretary William lohen 
ordered all branches of the military to 
hold a 24-hour safety "stand-down" and 
review their training prwcdurcs aficr a 
rash oi air cnislies It was the firsi sus- 
pension of all military pilot iraming 

fhc series nf air crashes started Sept 
13 when an .Air Force C-14t transport 
collided with a (Icmian military plane 
off the coast of Africa. In all. 33 were 
believed to be killed. 



I he next day. an f-M7A stealth 
fighter hmkc up in Highl at an air sht>vv 
III Maryland setting twtt houses on tire 
and injuring six people 

The day a tier thai a Navy F-IS weni 
down in Oman, killing ihe pilot, and .1 
Marine I 01 ps I - 1 K crashed off North 
Caioliiui. killing ivso pilols Also, Iwii 
planes fmni the New Jersey Air Naiional 
(iuard ciil tided utT the New Jersey coast 
Sept Ifi Ihe three pilols survived. 

On Sept I 'I. an Air force B-IH 
btimber crashed nn a training mission in 
Montana, killing all lour crew members 



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Meet me at Porter's 
for Fat Thursday. 




Joyce's Hair Tamers 



Natl Tech 



Cflfol Cdambers-Pishcr formerly of Cnrnper& has 
relocated to Joyces Hair Tamers she welcomes all 
former and new.clierit&. 



2026 Tottle Creek &lvd. 




Kansas State University Student Healtli Insurance Notice 

students may enroll in the Kansas State University Student 

Health Insurance Plan underwritten by Gerber Life Insurance 

Company. Premiums have been greatly reduced. 

Comprehensive Plan Monthly Rates 

30 years of age and younger 31 years of age and older 

Student Only - $66.08 Student Only - $94.83 

Basic Plan Monthly Rates 

30 years of age and younger 31 years of age and older 
Student Only - $40.00 Student Only - $57.50 

Please note: This is the only Student Health Insurance Plan endorsed by the 

University. 

If you are interested in enrolling, 

please contact G-M Undenwriters Agency, Inc. 

at (800) 521-2623 or at our e-mail address: 

gmu2@concentric.net 

or, for additional information, 

contact the Student Insurance Representative at 

Lafene Health Center. • ^ ^ - 

(785) 565-2255 



coHegian.kiu.edu 



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OFHaAUY LICENSED HERCHAIVDISE 




DON'T LET IT 
PASS YOU BY. 




This is the last week to get your 
picture in the 1998 Royal Purple! 

Portrait pictures are FREE for all students! 

MAKE-UP 



PORTRAIT PICTURES 

at Blaker Studio Royal 

1019A Poyntz Ave. 

THURSDAY, OCT. 23 
9 A.M-7 P.M. 



9Make-up portrait pictures will be taken 

Monday, Oct. 20 - Thursday Oct. 23 at Blaker Studio Royal. 

#Fraternity and sorority itiettibers who wish to be pictured with their 

respectivfi houses need to bring clothing consistent with the rest of their house. 

ANYONE CAN HAVE THEIR 
PICTURE TAKEN AT THIS TIME. 



^ 






The price cit" the 

Royal Purple Ye .irb(M)k i\ $24, 'J"!. 

Cotitatt u\ .It; Kit,l?K- I l.ill U\\,S.\2't->S?>7 

http://www.ipub.ksu.edu/rp/. rpfaJk^ieiki 



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^^B^ \ . STORY BV SAM FELSENFELD / 

► K-Stati to face onother option-oriented team this 
weekend when it battles Oklahoma in Norman. 



he K-Stiitc I'tHiihall icum will sec !>omc Tainiliar things when it 

filays iit OUuluimj tin Siilurday 

This won't he hot ii use >ic\en Wildcats arc fmm Oklahoma 
Insitad il will ho hccaiisL- the Swners have ii lilllc otcverything 
Ihc Wildcats have «n olTense, and it will be ihc fourth time in six 
games the lats faec an option attack. 

The Cats have a (no ol tailhaeks, F.nc Hickson. Mike Lawrence 
and Marlon ( harles. who have combined Tor ^26 yards through the 
lifsi si% games ivf the season 
And then there's Ihc Smincrs' Dc'Mond 
Parker, who has rushed for I, (MM) yards in 
(WO consecutive seasons, already pick- 
ing up 1 , 1 2f) on the ground this year 

"There aren't any, to my knowledge. 

running backs in the country that arc as 

talented as he is." K-Slate coach Hill 

Snyder said. 

"The (.'als have another running threat, 

Michael Bishop, as quarterback. Bishop is averaging more than 63 

yards per game on the ground and with 27 on Saturday, will set the 

K-State single-season record for rushing yards by a quartcrhuck, 

with four games remaining on the schedule 

The Sooners have liric Moore starling as quarterback. MiHjre 
gained 141 vards rushing last week against Uaylot, including an (tW- 
)ard touchdown run 

.And don't forget aKvut the passing game. Both teams have only 
compleied (>l passes this season. 

The Sooners will primarily run al K-Stale. and run the option. 
k-State taeed the option against Ohio. Nebraska and Missouri this 
sea>on The Cats beat ( thitt and Missouri, but gave up 56 points in 
losing to the No I C'ornliuskcrs. 

"An option olVcnse does put some restrictions on your defense, 
undeniably, at least it does for us," Snyder said. "The option attack 
virtually forces you to defend not only the leam that you're playing, 
bui the field Itself, from sideline to sideline" 

IH'spite ilicii strong dinning game, the Sooners know they have 
a challenge ahead of litem K-State 's run dclense has impnwcd 
each week, capped hy it.s performance against Texas A&M last 
week The Aggies entered the game with K- Slate with the No 5 
rushing attack m the country However, they managed only minus 
-15 yards against the tats' stingy defense 

hi addition to using their option oticme to try lo end their four- 

See OKLAHOMA, Pago • 



FREf SAFfTY 

Cephui Scott, No 3, 

and strong iaiety 

Jar rod Cooper, 

No 40, beo* down 

on Texot AAM bock 

Donle Hall Solurdav 

ol ttSU Slodium Hod 

Fumbled the boll, 

wKich the Witdcoti 

recovered 

CUF MUMUiO 



:=.10RV aV SAM FEt-SENFELD 



*• Freshman wide receiver David Alun got his 

chance to shine Saturday, making a bi^ statement. 



M\f 



hile beating Texas 
A&M 36-17 Saturday, 
many of the Wildcats 
look advantage of (he 
injured Aggies 

TcJias A&M played most of 
the game without two starling 
linemen, kith down with injuries, 
and )l> lop running hack. Dante 
Hall, who left the game al\er the 
first play with a bruised knee 

However, one Cat used 
Saturday's gime against the 
Aggies to take advantage of an 
injured K-State player 

1 reshman w ide receiver David 
Allen relurned punts for K- State 
for the third-consecutive game 
Allen was filling in for stipho- 
more free safety Lamar Chapman, 
who sufTcrcd a hypercxtcnded 



elbow (Jet. 4 al Nebraska 

Allen didn't make much of an 
impression when he came m 
against Nebraska, he fumbled a 
return attempt, one of three K- 
Staic turnovers thai night 

Bui against ihe Aggies, he 
made a sialcmeni with his play 

Allen returned sis punt-i for 
I2S yards, breaking Andre 
Coleman's school record. And 
now that Chapman is back he 
played at free safety in the closing 
minutes of Saturday's victory 
Alkn isn't tiw sure he's going to 
quietly hand the job buck ov ei 

"It's gonna be a light We'll 
see what happens," he said "Il 
will be a fighl back there. No hard 

See AUIN, Page 8 




WILDCAT DAVID ALLEN ltie» to outrun Mijiouii defenders at KSU Stadium Oct. 1 1 . Allen has filled m (or punt 
retLirn^ while Iree saleiy Lamar Chapman' I been out with a hyperexlertded elbow Against Nebraska, Allen him bed a 
return attempt Against Texas A&M, he relumed six punts (or 1 2S yords, breaking Andre Coleman's school record 




C F 



CtlSION KUINZI .1 g Kinw >n 

compvKf wgiittwing $«nd unwl 
to Cr*itwi a' c:r»jfc>nAm #dv 



True fans show 
Wildcat spirit 
by camping out 

"Why am I sitimg here''" 

That's what kept running through my mind 
Monday night at the basketball camp out. 

"Why am I silting on this couch in the 
cold when I could be at home doing some- 
thing productive, like sitting on the couch 
watching 
Sport.scenler''" 

As I looked 
around me. I 
got the feeling 
other people 
were Stinking 
the same thing 

"What are 
we all doing out 
here freezing 
our toes off to 
get tickets to 
watch a team 
that has been stuck in the cellar longer than a 
fine wine when we could be al home prepar- 
ing a victory party for this wx'ekcnd's trounc- 
ing of the Sooners'.'" 

To be honest. I couldn't figure it oui. 1 was 
completely puzzled. Why should I put myself 
through another season of torture'' 

Then, out of nowhere it hit me like Mike 
Tyson on Pro/jc I had a revelation A revela- 
tion so imtnense that I now tecl obligated to 
pass it on to all of the Wildcat fans who are 
still conftLsed like I was only a few days ago 

The reason we shivered through the camp 
out, the reason we're going to go to the games 
this year even if we ha\ e lo study lor a big test 
the next day and the reason we're going to 
cheer for the Cats even when they're behind 
is all very clear now We're Wildeais! 

Let me explain 

To be a true Wildcat fan means you go out 
and support the team through thick and thin 
Right now. It's really easy to be a Wildcat 
fotitball fan because, plain and simple, ihey 
win a lot. 

Make no mistake about it. though The 
true fans aren't necessarily the ones traveled 
to Dallas on New Year's Day to watch the Cats 
in the Cotton Bowl The true fans are the ones 
are going to show up and cheer on the (. ats 
this winter in Kramlage Coliseum 

h's time to find out who really bleeds pur- 
ple and who bleeds a lavender hue So today 
I'm issuing a challenge to myself and Cats 
e^-crywhea• to rise akrve the typical fair- 
weather fans you see at other universities. 

This year, it's lime to show the nation what 
it means to be a K-Siate Wildcat I can't think 
of a better place to start than next Thursday at 
Lnghl Night 

No matter how much you dislike Dick 
Vitale, no matter how annoying you find hini 
and no matter how much you'd like to take 
thai microphone and beat him on that bald 
head of his and oh, sorry. I kind of got ear- 
ned away there 

Anyway, no matter what your feelings arc 
for V I talc, I'm issuing a challenge to every- 
one to go support I he Cats on Oct 311 and at 
every game thereafter 

It's not easy to be an all-weather fan. Il^ 
not very fun to watch the Cats struggle 
against mediocre teams, .md it really hum in 
watch good teams whip up on us. It's espe- 
cially difficult lo sioniach the poundings Ihc 
Jay hawks have put on us in the past several 
yean; 

It takes a lot of courage to cheer fi>r a leam 
when it's down, but in the end it w ill pay olT 
Mark my words, the Cats are going lo climb 
back to Ihe top again II might noi be ihis year 
or next year or even 10 years from now. but il 
will happen 

Wouldn't It be nice lo be able to say, after 
we win a national championship, that you 
stuck with the tats through the rotten years 
and be one of the few people who are actual- 
ly telling the truth'' 



Men's golf team finishes 3rd 
at Louisiana Tecli Invitational 



jon WHtn 

.Ull 4,rik-r 

The K-State men's golf 
team had a strong third place 
effort in the Louisiana Tech 
Invitational in Calhoun, 
Louisiana's Pine Hills Coun- 
try Club 

The ihiid-plaa* 
tlnishtnthe M- 
team field is the 
Wildcat's besi 
showing of the sea- 
wm 

The Wildcats 
vhoi a ihiee-round comhined 
score of KW. 3S-over-par 

Senior B.J. Walter ted the 
Wildcats with a three-round 
total of 223 on the par- 72 
course 

After Monday's two 
round}, he was in a tie for 
13tb place at six-over-par 
With a onc-ovcr-par third 
round he movcnl up to finish 
seventh in the tournament 

K SliIc's Brant Etenninga 
finished in a lie lor eighth 
place, lie shot a 224 in Ihe 
three rounds with his carter 




low 71 in the second round 
His strong second round pui 
him in tie for third place ai 
the end of day one 

llenninga's third round 
score of 7tt knocked him into 
eighth place 

Senior Matt 
Murdoch 
shot 74-76-76. 
putting him in a tie 
for 12th 
place, while junior 
/ac Clark tied for 
l.^ih place with a 
74-78-76. Sophomore Brian 
Racettc improved steadily 
throughout the tournament 
in a tie for 5'*th place alter 
Ihe first two rounds with 
scores of 83 and 78, he fired 
a 7S in the third round to fin- 
ish in a lie for 50th place. 

Arkansas Slate and 
Lamar Univcrtiily took fint 
and second place with scores 
otXKN and Kg3. respectively 
Andre Prcjcan of Louis- 
iana Tech won the tourna- 
ment with a (cven-under-par 
performance. 



Women s team 
claims 2nd 
in tournament 



On Tuesday, the KSiile 
wonnen^ golf team claimed sec- 
ond place at the Sunllower' 
Marilynn Smith Invitational m 
Andover, Kan. The Wildcats were 
eo-hosts of the tournament with 
Wichita State and went into the 
lecond day of ihe two-day tourna- 
rrtenl in second pliKe. 

The Dniversity of fCan^ias won 
(he tournament with a 432-stroke 
total The Joyhtwki h«d the lead 
on Monday tnd didn't look hack 

Wichita ^tate\ Natasha Au.s- 
derau bad a 1 50 lolll to claim first 
place for Mumky, but KU'x Jamie 
Tucker moved from a second 
plice ttuvc-way tic Ui share the 
title of civchampiun with Aus- 
ii««i. 

See OOlf, Pag* I 




0* 



*■ Goch«tk wt 
the inrtmeff* 

Oo /oy warit to 
get involved wlh 
the sports butt! 
Go to th* \Ahb ot 
footboV sporH bu 



II is hop' Awesome game last week You 
guys played your heart out," an excited 
fan wanted lo say to his fa von I e player 
■M\a the Texa,s A&M game 

There are times when fans want lo run 
up to one of the K- Slate football players 
atlcr a game and tell them how well they 
played 

Through K-Statc's online Wildcat 
interviews, fan.s can't run up to Utem, but 
it is pt>ssible to chat with certain football 
stars 

Online Wildcat interviews take place 
at 7 pm. every Thursday They arc 30- 
minuie live interviews with a designated 
K-State football player. Today's interview 
il with Junior tight end Justin Swift 

"We post us many questions as possi- 
hie," laid Tim McC unc, gmduaic student 
in loftwan engineering "Alumni use ii a 



lot. Wc get questions from Texas, Flonda, 
California and all over the country It's 
open to anyone on the Internet These arc 
a type of inter^'^cws very different from 
what you'll jcc on TV or in the newspa- 
pers," 

McCune sorts through all the quea- 
tions sc>nt lo the chat line and doctdes 
which questions the player will see. The 
questions don't have to be sports-orient- 
ed cither Some questions concern per- 
sonal subject matter All questions asked 
aa' decided by ihe online audience. 

"We had a guy ask a player if he knew 
an old fnend of his. They can be any kind 
of qucttions at all Another guy asked 
what it was like to play offensive lackle, 
so the questions really vary," McC'une 
said 

Wayne Becker, junior in interior 



architecture, said he tikes to watcli the 
messages being sent 

"I've watched stmu- of the comersa- 
tions on the screen, but I haven't ever seni 
anything. You would be surpnsed at what 
you can leam about players on and off the 
fieM," Becker said "It's a lot of fun " 

McCune said he tends to steer away 
questions that deal with injuries, recruit- 
ing and other confidential Icatn infomta- 
tion 

"The lines arc usually ktadetL but I 
sometimes prepare a few questions ju-sl in 
case there is a lag. It usiuilly keeps me 
clicking fast," Md'une said 

The record-setting performance 
against Texas A&M ha» many fans eager 
to hear what players have to say. 

See WMID, Poga I 



STORY BY JACOB JANSONIUS 



- m -. -^ * • ■» * r 



THmSPAY, OCTOBIR 23, 1997 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Celebration 

STORIES BY LAURA POPE 



Mall becomes reality after 20 years of planning 



Ii was an issue of whether to leave ii a cornfield 
or lum it into a central businciiii district. An adopted 
land-use plan called for the fctlevclopmcnt and with 
the aid of the largest grant ever given to a Kansas 
city, the Manhattan Town Center was created, 

A land-use plan, adopted in I '■)M. tailed for the 
central business district to be mamtaincd us a 
regional shopping area The Iwal planning board 
and Manhattan City I'ommission had turned down 
nutnerous requests to allow dc^elopnicnt of a 
regional shopping center on the city's west side in 
1971. 11^72. 1 1)76 and I iJ??. according to an article 
published by The Manhattan Mercury rn October 
1987. 

In 1978, a private consuhing firm was hired to 
evaluate the potential of downiow n Manhattan as a 
regional shopping center for the surrounding trade 
area A report published a year later said the rede- 
velopment was feasible, desirable and in many 
ways essential to the well-being of residents of the 
entile city 

That same year, proposals from developers for 
the redevelopment project were requested. After 
interview mg eiyhi firms. Forest City Rental proper- 
ties of Cleveland was chosen 

To save downtown, city ufTicials decided to 
demolish a third of it and build in its place a clima- 
tized mall to lure shoppers for years to come, 
according to The Mcrcur>' m a special edition The 
mil would lake out eight blocks of the downtown 
and cost $24 million. 

The city requested SI I 5 million from the 
Department ofHousing and Urban IXn elopment in 
an Urban Development Action Grant. It was milial- 
ly granted $8 million, so the city restructured ihe 
project down to $10 million. On (Jet, 2H, 1983, the 
city secured preliminary gram approval. 

In early 1984, Dil lards Department Store want- 
ed to join J C Penney and the Jones Store as a major 
tenant. Soon after, the Jones Store pulled out and 
Dillard's came in as the second- leading department 
store. 

The mall faced many problems before construc- 
tion began. Plans called for the demolition of build- 
ings occupying eight blocks of Third Street between 
Leavenworth and Pierre streets. They would have 
had to relocate nearly 75 businesses 

Condemnation awards on several of the mall site 
properties produced acquisition cost overruns of 
nearly S3. 7 million The project turned into a 160 
million downtown redevelopment project. 

In July 1985. a verbal agreement to release 



funding was made, but only after Forest City Rental 
Properties had agreed to put in an extra SI million. 
This money was put into equity in the form of direct 
payment to the city. The grant was then reduced to 
$9 million, and Tinal approval was made one month 
later. 

The %'i million grant awarded to Manhattan was 
the largest grant ever given to a Kansas city. 

The city negotiated with 67 land owners and 73 
businesses occupying the property to get tiie land 
needed to build Ihe mall. Of those businesses, 13 
businesses closed, three reopened in eonsniidatinn 
with existing businesses and 56 were relocated. 

Formal ground-breaking ceremonies were on 
June 6, 1 986, and one year later the structure was 
built. Construction went smoothly on the 380,000- 
square-fooi structure and then work began on indi- 
vidual shops, according to The Mcreury. 

On Oct. 7. 1987, Dillard's celebrated its grand 
opening with city, mall and company ofTicials. 
Founder and Chairman of the Board William T 
Dil lard, was in attendance. 

Nearly 20 years since the 1968 land-use plan 
called for a regional shopping area, the mall (^ned 
on Oct 26. 1987. 

The mall reflects 20 years worth of downtown 
planning. It was built to reflect the architecture and 
character of the business community it now 
anchors Some of the oldest buildings in Manhattan 
werc torn down and their influence is still seen, 
according to The Mercury. 

The design of the building and the mall is .sup- 
posed to blend with the downtown buildings, said 
C hris Heavey, former general manager of the mall 
in The Mercury article. 

The Town t^'entci project manager said in The 
Mercury that research was conducted for a year and 
a half to ensure that the existing heritage of the area 
was built into various pieces of the mall. 

The feature of the old buildings replicated the 
most IS the rosette The 1 2-inch rose symbol adorns 
the mall inside and out. It is also the oft'icial sym- 
bol of the Town Center. The design came from the 
Hopper Building, 200 Poyntz Ave . and was saved 
and displayed in the mall. The original rosette can 
still be seen in front of the main fountain on the 
vkcst side of the mall. 

Today, the mail houses three large department 
stores, M small business and two restaurants The 
Town Center's theme, "In the Heart of It All." has 
remained the same over the past 10 yeani. The Town 
Center celebrates its 10th anniversary this week. 




MANHAHAN 

TOWN Cfm.Q 

Anniversary 
Celebration 

Today through 
SufUHiy 

• AAniv«r»ory Rvloll 
Promohon mIm, promoHom, 
•fiiefiamment, caw b rHy end 
moicoi appaarancM. 



ABOVE. 

MANHATTAN 

TOWN CENTER 

official ly opened in 

1987 ond now 

housei three large 

department stores, 64 

tmall buiirteiMi and 

two reitauronti 

RIGHT. 

JUUA SCHOOL 

children receive a 

lour ol liie Town 

Center during the 

construction process 

in 19B7 



• 10th onniverjary gala 
Sohi rday /Sunday 

• "Art o( il All " Twodoy art 
duploy. 

Sum* Tlw MonhuKtm Wn CanMr 

MIKI ENOILHAROT/Collogajn 



Manhattan Town Center celebrates decade of business 



Manhattan Town Center i» pulling 
out all Ihe stopa Uiis week during its lUih 
anniversary, "Celebration ol the 
Decade." 

The anniversary celebration begun 
Wednesday when Ihe mall welcomed the 
Manhattan Chamber of Commerce 
Business After Hours Invited guests 
were entertained to the theme of "A 
Taste of Manhattan Town Center" with 
food and entertainment by a local duo, 
Cheaper iimenainmem 

Today, patrons of the Town Center 
will be able to enjoy free samples of 
Kansas foiHl products, giveaways, enter- 
tainment and discounted prices through- 
out the day Registrations for a cruise 
and a key give-away for the Purple 
Power Machine will also take place 

The Purple Ptwei Machine is a Ford 
Bronco donated by Dick Fd wards Ford, 
Audio Junction and the radio group of 
KMKF-FM 101 5, KM AN- AM 1350 
andKXBZ-FM MM 7. 

A children's birthday parly will be 
from 6:30 lo 8 p.m in the food court 
Children ages 1 1) and younger can help 
cclebrale and eat birthday cake with the 
Town Center lion, TC; Subway's Sub 
Man; the Vodvill Klown. Richard 
Renncr; and three child entertainers 

"We're looking forward to the kids' 
party. It's going to be lots of fun." Monnic 
Applcgate, marketing director, said. 

Friday's big event is the Anniversary 
Gala The evening will consist of min- 
gling, dancing and dining at food theme 
stations throughout the corridors of the 
mall The theme stations will be catered 
by Holiday Inn Chef Darrin Cave These 
will include a carving station. Italian 
and French Quarter- themcd stations, ice 
carving and dessert displays. 
F.ntcrtainment will include the Hays Big 



Band and (Jueen Bay, an internationally 

known jaAz vix:alist. 

Ten dollars of each ticket will go to 
benefit the Mayor's Holiday Tree Fund, 
and n will be matched dollar for dollar 
by the McCormick Foundation," 
Applcgate said. 

The evening will end with a special 
indoor 11 reworks display and presenta- 
tion by i^rotcchmcians from Kansas 
City and the Toast at Ten to commemo- 
rate 10 years of business. 

"It's goings 10 be pretty unique and 
spectacular," Applcgate said "We're 
anticipating a lovely evening." 

Town Center Ambassadors will be 
helping to staff the event, \yhich has 
been in planning for IK months. 
Appk*gate said. Those in attendance at 
the gala will be able to register for a 
cruise spimsored by Kansas State Travel 
and for season tickets lo McCain 
Auditorium events. These pn/es. along 
with others, will be given away at the 
closing of the celebration on Sunday. 

Four chances to win a key for the 
Purple hiwct Machine will be available 
during these events. For all key giveaways 
the reeipicnl must be present to win. All 



10 winners will then have the chance to 
try their key to start the vehicle on Sunday 
after the final key is given away. 

"This was a group etfort," Applcgate 
said "We wanted to have something to 
introduce at Purple Power Play on 
Poyntz and continue the momentum 
until the anniversary It's something fun 
and very visual." 

Entertainment throughout the week 
will be provided by dilTercnt kinds of" 
groups and organizations on the perfor- 
mance stage in center court 

"We have a full schedule of enter- 
tainment." she said. 



The celebration comes to an end on 
Sunday with the event "In the Art of It 
.■\ll" A vancly of art displays featuring 
local artists will be shown, and demon- 
strated Ihroiighoul the diiy. 

Groups and individuals giving 
demonstrations including the Kon/a 
Praine Quilters; Sylvia Beeman. papier- 
mache unist. Bill Wedekind a blind man 
without hands who makes pottery. 
Penne Chapui. pi>rcelain doll maker; and 
Arlene Thurlow. leather crafter 
Manhattan High School Art Club will 
ha\e a free-standing display of school 
projects. 









'IHDI-n STUI>-CHT41U0CI-f1TI0Hi 

Presents 



Fall Festival 



November 2, !997 • Dinner: 5-7 p.m. 
Jardine Community Center 

Tickets to be sold in union outside the stateroom I l-l p.m. 

Oct. 23, 24 A 27 • Adults $7, Children 7-14 half price • 

Limited nijiviber of Tickets 



Indian Dance and Music Concert 
The Chhaya Academy of Arts 

7:30 iJ.ni., Mitliols Ttieatre 
Concert is open and FftCE to Ihe public. 

Co-sponsored t>y International and Area Studies, Department of 

Music and the Department of Speech Cornmunicatlon, ThCritre 

and Dance. Artistic Director: Pandit Qopal Prasad Dut>cy 



IHOLAI Conference 



October 24. 1997 
-Keynote Speaker- 




"Construvetfdo nuestro futuro " 
k-Slate Union 

3:30 p.m. Krec Adinisiiion 
followed by: 4: 30 reception- Flint Hills room 

Texas Democratic Nominee 
PhD Graham *s opponent 

'*The other side of the Story '* 

Sponwifcd by Ihc Ht.ipunic AmtncanLeiikrihipOrganiailiml 



^CT^ MUFFLER HOUSE 

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K^^HOUSE OF TINT 

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TRAILER HITCHES - SALES & INSTALLATION 

Men. -Fri, 7:30 a.m. -5:30 pm. . 

2049 Ft. Rilesf Blvd. 
776-8955 or 1-800-439-8956 

Take advantage of our courtesy van for rides to school 

and home while your vehicle Is being serviced. 

Same LocBtlonI 

FREE ESTIMATES 



Join Us. 



/ \ 



inferfaith Sharing 

Christian-Jewish-Muslitn 

"Understanding Christian Liturgical Worship" 

Thursday, Oct. 23, 9:15 p.m» 

St. Isidore Chapel 

711 Denison 

Come and join us for on explanation of Christian 

worship by Father Keith Weber and share in the 

service followed by refreshments and conversation. 

Sponsored by the KSU committee on religion and 
;, campus ministries j 



HIV/AIDS 

NEEDED 
PEER HIV/AIDS EDUCATORS 

STUDENTS INTERESTED IN 

JOINING A TEAM OF STUDENTS TO 

TEACH OTHERS ABOUT HIV/AIDS 



REQUIREMENTS: 

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ARE YOU INTERESTED IN THIS 3 
HOUR CREDIT COURSE THIS SPRING 

For more information contact 

HEALTH EDUCATION & PROMOTION 

LAFENE HEALTH CENTER 

532-6595 



ftW. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



THURSDAY, OCTOJIR 23, 1997 



Fraternity receives highest chapter award 



ZMH VAMt 

The members of ihc K-State chap- 
ter of Alpha Tau Omega can walk 
iicross ihiscampus 
with Ihtir hcsds A i ' 

The ATOs QStaj 

recc ivcd I hrcc 1 p 1 1 -t^IC i f'i 

imtional rratcrmty GREEK LIFE 
awaw. including 
the True Merit, the highest honor 
given lo an ATO chapter. 

Bill Muir, assistant to the vice pres- 
idcnt for institutional advancetnent. 
director ul' community relations and 
adviser of ATO, said the True Merit 
cmphusiies positive community and 



campus inxolvcmcnt. a.s well as focus- 
es on the chapter's goal of graduation 
and job and career placements for 
seniors by Wi 

"Only five chapters out of ISft 
received this award which is the high- 
est award for overall excellence," Miiir 
said. 

The ,'\TOs also received The 
Anderson Gold Communications 
Award, which recognizes the Vim age. 
the studem-puhlished maga/ine that 
g«s to alumni. This award is for 
excellence in communication includ- 
ing public relations, recruiting, and 
community, campus and alumni rela- 
tions. 

The fraiemiiy was also runner-up for 



the Community Awareness Award, an 
award that recognises exceptional social 
services and phitamhropic aclisities. 

Three members ot the fraternity 
also shined nationally for the AT'Os 

Two Salina natives made a great 
impression for the national fraternity. 

(juy (iross, senior m biology, was 
the al-largc recipient ol the National 
Undergraduate Scholarship Award 
while Joe Stein. 1^7 graduate, was the 
national runner-up for (he Thomas 
Arkle (."lark Award. 

'■' was very surprised when I got 
this award." Gross said. "It was such a 
long process of questionnaires and 
applications, plus there were so many 
applicants" 



Jon Freeman, senior in biology and 
former president and rush chair of 
ATO. was first runner-up for ihe 
National Undergraduate Scholarship 
Award. 

"I was very excited to get this." 
freeman said "It shows a great credit 
to our fraternity, especially with the 
True Merit." 

"These awards were in recognition 
of how they do things, and they do 
things well," Muir said "They really 
arc a good group of people I've 
enjoyed working with them for the pasi 
27 yean*" 

The awardji will be presented at a 
banquet on Nov. IS in Indianapolis. 
Ind. 



Government ends case with confession of bombing's alleged mastermind 



MKKwno mil 

NEW YORK - The 1W3 World 
Trade Center bombing was designed lo 
topple the two 1 10- story towers like 
dominoes, killing a quarter million 
people and convincing Americans they 
were at war, a federal agent testified 
Wednesday. 

Secret Service Agent Brian Parr 
closed the prosecution's three-month 
case against Ihc alleged bombing mas- 
termind hy recounting the horror he 
said Ram^i Yousef wanted to bring to 
the United States. 

"He said he intended for one tower 
to fall into the other lower and it would 
cause about 25fl,fKH) civilian casual- 
ties," Parr said, describing a six-hour 
conveniation Yousef had with agents 



after his 1 W5 arrest 

The agent said Yousef sought 
destruction on the scale of the atomic 
bomb in ftiroshima. Japan, in 1445 to 
convince the United Slates lo stop sup- 
porting Israel. 

Parr said Yousef confessed in great 
detail about his terrorist acliviiies, 
including ihe Feb 26, IW.l, World 
Trade Center bombing that killed six 
people, injured more than !.(MKI others 
and caused more than a half billion 
dollars damage 

Parr's recollection of what Yousef 
told agents atkr his capture in Pakistan 
culminated a prosecution case glued 
logcthcr by circumsiantial evidence. 

Parr said Yousef tbund Israeli tar- 
gets tiw difficult to attack so he flew to 
the United Slates in September 1992 



with Ahmad Ajaj. the only pcrstin he 
knew in America, so he could choose 
bombing targets 

Ajaj and three other men were con- 
victed in 1994 of conspiracy in the 
bombing and were each sentenced to 
240 years in prison Yousef also was 
convieied last year of conspiracy in a 
plot to bomb a dozen U.S. airliners 
over the Far East 

Parr said Yousef dro^e from Jersey 
City, NJ., to Brooklyn the night before 
the explosion, staying overnight with 
an accomplice before driving in ihe 
morning lo the Trade Center 

Yousef tiopcd a special box he con- 
slrucled would tlirect the explosives 
toward the Trade (enter's support 
beams, crippling the buildings, Parr 
said. 



Parr said Yousef and an accomplice 
look the van to the Trade Center. 
parked it and tried to hurry oui in a car 
brought by a second accomplice, only 
lo be delayed for two minutes by a 
delivery truck 

Then Yousef dropped letters in a 
mailbox to publications and broadcast- 
ers taking responsibility for ihe bomb- 
ing and hurried back to Jersey City, 
where he watched smoke rise from the 
Trade Center. 

Parr's testimony shed some light on 
how the bombing was financed, which 
has remained mysteriou,s. Yousef and 
the others involved in the ploi were 
running so low on money that ihey had 
lo bomb the city's two lallesi buildings 
before their March rent was due in 
Jcney City, N.J.. Parr said. 



Allen 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

feelings, though." 

Of course. Chapman didn't do badly 
returning punts belore his injury He 
returned a punt 94 yards for a touch- 
down against Ohio in K- Stale's home 
opener, providing enough points to keep 
the Cats from losing. 

Allen didn't have any returns for 
touchdowns against the Aggies, but he's 
still happy with his play 

"They have the No I punt team in 
the nation, so it felt real good," he said. 

Allen set Ihe stage for K-Siaie. 
returning Texas A&M's first punt 24 
yards to the Aggie 48-yard line The 
Cats scored a touchdown less than four 
minutes later, taking a lead they would 
never give up 

"All week on film we saw ihni he 
I Texas A&M punter Shane Lechlcr) would 
i>uikick his coverage," he said. "He was 
oulkicking his cmerage a little bit. and we 
figured thai if ue earned (he two outside 
guys, we'd have a great return." 

But his longest runback came after 
the Aggies' next possession. Lcchler 
shanked his ailempi and, after a consid- 
erable roll, the hall had only traveled 42 
yards, less than his 4H.8 average. 

Allen was expecting a deeper punt 
and couldn't field the ball But the 
AggK's were slow m downing the ball. 
no he picked it up and brought it 32 



yards upficld. 

He might have been in the position to 
score, hut Lcchler grabbed his face mask 
and twisted him down from behind. 

With the 15-yard penahy. K-State's 
offense took over at the Texas A&M 14- 
yard tine. 

"I was getting ready to yell 'peter' 
which means everybody gets away from 
the hall and lets them field it," Allen 
said. "What I saw was the guy thai was 
close to the ball kind of hacked away 
from the ball and let the hall roll. I 
looked upficld, and everybody was just 
kind of svalking because ihcy saw the 
hall on the ground 1 felt it was a perfect 



opportunity to pick it up and go." 

Allen only managed to pick up W 
yards on return No. 3. but he got back 
into his groove when Lcchler punted for 
the fourth time, josi less than two min- 
utes into the second quarter. 

This time, Lcchler boomed the ball, 
sending it M yards lo the K- State 17 
However. Allen brought it back 4K 
yards, giving the Aggies a net of only 16 
yards and setting up ihe Cats with a first 
down ai Texas A&M's 3 5 -yard line. 

On that drive. K -State only moved the 
ball lU yards and had lo settle for another 
field goal, one thai would not have been 
possible without Allen's runback. 




PIZZA 

SHUHLE 

DELIVER!. 

mm 

> J800ClaflinRoadJ 



the women of X £ 2 

wont 
to thank the men of 

AXA and AY 

for a great 
Homecoming weekl 



VOU ARE ALREADY tM aCCIEVIlLE. 

WHY NOT VISIT OUR PUB? 
(Student Pub that is!) 

The 1998 Royal Purple yearbook 
will be taking portrait pictures 

one last night for FREE! 

GET A FREE SANDWICH AND FRIES FOR YOUR EFFORT! 



/ FRIDAY. OCT 24 ^ 

FROM 4 TO 9 P.M. I , 

Sat RUSTY'S last CHANCE/ ^^^fe; 
TNs will be the UST CHAHCC to get the ^ 
\99t Royal Purple yearbook for ^i!4.95] 
Join us for Last Chance at Last Chawed /purple 
AHYONE CAN (ET THEIR PKTUKE TAKCM AT TIBS nMB 




9^ 



Allen said he hopes in continue on 
special teams even though Chapman is 
ready to play again He also said he 
hopes he earned himself more playing 
time on ofTense. 

"1 want Ihe ball as many limes as I 
can get it, no matter how I can get it 
if I gotta do it on return or if 1 gotta do it 
on offense." Allen said. "However I can 
gel it, I can do it." 

Monday ahernoon. the Big 12 
announced thai Allen was named Ihe Big 
12 Specially Player of the Week 
Chapman won the award when he 
relumed Ihc punt for Ihe touchdown 
against Ohio on Sept B. 



rrcjiiinnev 
I es(iii«i ( t'liU'r 

I IVC |">IVLIIKIIKV 
ICSlillt! 

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sen ICC 

Sumo Jay ivsiihs 

"t .ill lor;inntiinlnk'i 



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Oklahoma 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

game losing streak lo K-Siate. the 
Sooiiers will try lo take advantage ot a 
possible letdown by the ( als. K-Siutc 
had an emolional victory over the 
Aggies last week, and the SiHuiers will 
try lo catch the CaK Iwiking forward to 
ihcir November games against Kansas 
and I oloradu 

Dui Snyder, aOer watching I ouisiana 
Slate lose to t*lc Miss la.si week afier 
beating lop-ranked Tlorida in its previ- 
ous game, is making sure the ( ais don't 
fall into the same trap. 

"I think you always arc concerned 
about that. LSI weiil through Ihe same 
(hing, Pcnn Slate went throujih the same 
thing, and probably counilcss others as 
well I think those ate jusi two of the 
more prominent ball games." he said 



"You're always concerned about that, but 
even if it wasn't an emotional win. you'd 
slill be concerned You're always con- 
cerned regardless of which way it goes. 

"I know It's on our players' minAs. 
They're i'ocuscd on nol taking any foot- 
ball team we play for gninicd and nol 
having a letdown." 

While the Cats aren't looking for- 
ward to any future games, they are liwk- 
ing at previous games 

Last year. K-State jumped out lo a 
42-14 lead against Oklahoma, only to 
waieh it dwindle in the fourth quarter 
The StMjners closed Ihe gap to 42-35, 
and were driving toward a score, but an 
interception by K-Slale's Chris Canty 
a I limed the Cats to run out Ihe clock and 
hold on for the win. 

"Lasi year, our offense kepi going but 
our defense stopped working," K-State 
linebacker Travis (X'hs said. "Our plan is 
not lo do that again this year." 



Golf 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

On Monday, the Cats shot a leani 
two-round total of 64t). eight strokes 
behind the Jayhawks Junior Cat golfer 
Jane Yi was tied for sixth with a score of 
157, 

Yi shot a 71 m her third round 
Tuesday, which propelled her lo finish 
with a 22K. in third place freshman 
Hdie Murdoch ended Monduv m ninth 



place, but moved up to finish in a tie for 
eighth place with a 235. 

Other C ats scores include senior Ann 
Slater, who tied for 1 2ih with a 23^ total, 
junior Mii7i Taylor, who finished tied 
for 24th with a score of 24H; and sopho- 
more Came Chambers, who finished 
tied for 26th wilh a score of 249, 

Freshman Traci Benninga look part 
as an individual and finished in a tie for 
34th with a 256. 

The women's golf team will see 
action Nov. 2-4 at the Roadrunner 
Invitational in Las Cruces, N.M. 



Wired 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

Becker is ih inking about asking a 
question hinfsclf 



"I want 10 find out if he gets frustrat- 
ed because of all the scrambling Bishop 
does, or if he even cares if he gets the 
ball It would just be cool to find out 
what ihe players arc actually thinking, 
instead of jusi speculating." Becker said 




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KAOTOUTTON 



KANSAS STATE COllEGIAN 




THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23 



19 9 7 



DAI LYcros sword 



ACflOSS 
1 Klnpilon 
Tflotono 
4 My Iriencfs 
name- 
ukas? 
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ho(«M> 

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erxilo 

14 Kyrgyzstan 
dty 

15 Nebras- 
ka's stats 

flOWOf 

17 Me«dow 

16 Ruahmore 

(tgure 
19 Sacufllies 

21 Vear-end 
quati 

24 Wilde- 
beests 

25 Tic-tac- 
toekMS 

2f DeM*d 
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get a date 

nriop 

38 Brine h«it> 
36 -- the Nils 

(ancient) 
38 Acquire 
40Fa«len 
41Pr«- 

dlptoma 



hurdte 
43 Its atwit Is 

highly toxic 
45 Peruvian 

current 
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hangout 
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premier, 

1 966-74 

54 0dyaaeus' 
rescuer 

55 Eero's dad 
55 Monoklrii's 

lack 
57 Small k>w 

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65 Poker ploy 
59 Entreat 



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UITIMATE FAKF300K'S. NIIV ALBUM IS A REPHKSHTNG 'IHANGK FROM TTP, SKA 'TRAZK SW!^KPTT1G THl^ KATTOK 

BRING BACK M ROCK 







¥ Want to heor Ultimate 
Fokabook't ntw album? 
fl* e<!ollpgion hoi towid 
clips of Eltdnc KMufi 
Paiiiei Go to tifip /.'c^lle 
gion ktu edu/linl«t/ufb Kimi 



R I V I I W II 

ll iiccinx iill \\k hyfU' in music iiim is ahtnii 
cIcclntiiKj and >liii 

Dul wliiit hiipjx'ncJ In nuk n' mil ' 

Wcll,ii.illisrit!hi Milk 

world M;iiilwllairs imii 

I'llMtiatc li)lkcliii*i|( 

will !irii)(i \wX '11* 

rul) tuivk 10 llUIMt' 

"' Ir 1 L' t' 1 r I *.■ 
Kisstny I'jrtics" 
IS iIh' kinil's new .ilhnm. 
rclciiH'd on I awrcncv's 
Ntiisttnii' lUxiirtls 

1 1 voti iIiil'w 
cqn.il .inuuinls o) Ww/ci 
iind ( Ikmp Iriik into .i 
hlcnik't, Willi |n\l .i liit <i( 
r.Hi'nu'itl I'll (Ik suliv 
yiiu wiHikl lia\ L* lliiin.ili* 
liikcbtHik 

Ilk' iilhuni 
kicks otV Willi "Kif. Kir 
.\w;i)" lis ,1 ptiwiilid 
!(l;ili i>t piiwi'i-jiitp ili.ii K 

lilt' |K'ltt.'ll ICilllltlt SIIIIL' 

III] iIk' ;illiiMn ll IcaiuriA 

wvtp^s ,nul ^'uti.uisl Hill 

McShiinc's [HHvcilnl, st^ii.i- 

hirc kocals. i\\y\wf wiilt 

drummer I tit Vlflm's |tiiipiil- 

>-ivc ilrumniini! iiml Kissisi Nui 

t'iilbv'sd\ii,iiiiiv bass iiiit'v 

llic sctnnd ii.Kk 
'Dunmind King,'* is a, <>liiwcr iinii 
lliui ciptodcs uiic\pci'lal|y Im itii.nii 
vttsvs then (lies hiii'k tkwn alWr ,) tcvs 
sccnnds 
"All the Ni'W hustm>" is a hcii%ier smij; 
iIkiI lias a di'finilc Wclvci lolliicniv. in \n\ 
mmd It also llMlnri's I I lis iirt^>nul ditiiti 
nKT, Mill Waklmann. as do linn oilier siiti),''> 
oil I he conipiiil ill St 

MiShaitf's jrmuiT soln is su luclal it tiiinv 
hut II 's a wonderiul pain 

\kSl).iik" olien liicak* mio ,i l\.iulitiil 
falsfito \iiici' ihrmijiltoiit m.my nl tlie sniiirs, 
Jiij "Riill (I k-cirit KissiDL' I'anies pi 1 1" Ici 
luiv thai lalscltOtil various |ioinis in ilit son;: 
Ibc snii^ slarts Willi Mt Shane mii^' 111^1 almig 
wilh lii> guitar htckinj; Inin Inr .thoul a 
niinutc. tlieii hniMs imolhe lull hand itii.kiitu' 
mil. Willi Mclin's drums liikiiij! eenler ttMge 



PHIL K I I L U M 

"Diiwnsiairs Arenii Rix'k" is ilic cU>i«C!il 
tJl It tonics lo ptiiMny a piink mkh! lis a ta.si, 
ramhniKliiHis iiaek ihal hii> a tiny bit tit' 
IK'seendenls inHnence In it 

lliere'-i also a hi/arrc noise freak iwil in the 
middle that sinprisetj itie and niipresscd me at 
the tiime lime I Inve noise when it's dune 
well 

**ll.ning liiit Much Inn" is a pretty sluw. 
almnst hj Had -type sitii|; ilul is a bil ofdcpar' 
Hire Inr the guys 

■'t ire lis lltirriir?«" is one of my Tavarite 
I'hiiiiaie lake HiMik son^is. and it eoincv otf 
well on (I) lis ,1 last power-pup lumiher 
j:iMtaiileed to (.'el you out ol ymir seal and 
dimtni); arinind ynur apiirimeiii like you've 
itevei daikvd lie I ore 1 eoiild luve swwn I 
lieaul a svlnplione reat Ms head at one point in 
ilie song fm ,1 tiuiplf seconds, nw. 

t!| II returns lo the heavier side of iheir 
power-pop atlaek wilh "I iTerall Halo" 
MtShaiie's lal^eiio pops up again and sounds 
wonder I'lil in the song 

lliere's a gre.it hreakdiiwii about a minute 
mio tilt song tMili MtSlmne and Waldmann 
kiekiiie oiii ilie lams 

( iilln 's b.isMills shiiie on ihe iniro in "You 
VSon't See Is,* ,ts he leads ihe kind inio the 
song wiih Mtnie snuMth. walking buss line^ 
1 lie harmonies on iliis lr;tek are stellar. 

rile tlosing Iratk. "SiKer IJale," is a nice 
ballad with some lop-iuileh vocal harinunics 
ili.li>> OUT loo last 

\ll in all. I letlrit kissing Tarties" is a 
t'aui.isiit album bom begiinimg loeiid with nu 
lltiowaway ir.iiks al all 

Willi Ml songs in M\ minutes, these boys 
waste no nine in rotkmg you My only beet 
with the albtiiu is I wish Colby's biiss was 
mi led liigbei up in the sound int\ His bass 
11 1 Iv ail' mil edible, but ihey aren't very notice- 
able iiiuth ot ilie tmie 

Also, you don't get ihe band's paiented 
imk ^lar onstage moves wiib ihe it I bum 
Mavbi. llk'v ^bollld make sonie Ultimate 
I akeKiik .ittioii figures to gu with the album. 
I smell meitliaiidisiiig 

I Itiin.itt laki'fNiiik IS having an album a'lcase 
pari) lomglil .it Itombers t pstaiu Mith Danger 
Dob Si I tome otil .ind wniifss both hand.s' mek- 
stai tiiou's the slum starts al lllp.ni 

Bring Kitk the ruck. 



Going 

BIG 
TIME 

Local country singer 
achieves success as an 
opening act and turns 
his sights to Nashville. 

StORV BY SANDI DAVIS 



When an opportunity presents itiwlf. the only 
thing to do IS grub on with both hands 
Kick [)avi<s, senior in feed science and 
agrietillutal lechnohigy management. knoWK this from 
esperieiicc 

I )uvis was the opening act for Tracy Byrd on Oct. 3 at 
Kemingion's in Inpcka 

Ihc o|>p<iriiiiiity came about allcr he became Ihe 
lopeka winner ot the Jimmy IX'un t'ountry Showtkiwn 
thiii summer 

I he contest gave turn the thitnee lo open for Wade 
Hayes m Iowa last summer lie then got the tall lor ihe 
Byrd concerl 

" riicy just tailed up and asked mc to do it " Davis 
said "I ihouglll il was a joke." 

Dans said the eoiiterl was unbclievubte. with more 
tlinn 2.INHI people attending fk'fore he went oiisiagc. his 
fricmls got the tiowd shouting his name 

"That made 11 even more nerve-wruckmg." Davis 
%aid. 

Alkr the iihtm. be spent some lime talking with 
Uyrd's rood manager, and he got to meet Ihc sitar himselt 




in ilyrd's tour bus 

" I be whole ibmg wns jiisi unbelicvahlt'.'* Da^ i-> s.nd 

lor as much as Diivis has accomplished n wiiiild 
seem like he's been singing country all his life but he 
got his start less than two years ago 

A year and a half ago, Davis deciiied to wnte a song 
tor Ins mother, who has taiieei Ills fiHinimale ■.luiwed 
hini s«mie guitar chords, so be was itbic 10 play lot het 

"It was an awesome feeling to be ahle to say I wrole 
this," Davis said 

Davis plays guitar and smjts. bat his leal love is song- 
writing When he's performing. Davis sings ,1 imv oi 
either people's songs and his own 

"I don't care if I couldn't sing," Davis viid 'Hut I 
love to write." 

Mis fnends eonvlnted him lo enter Hit MauUatitin 
Town (enter music contest last year, ami be siatleil gain- 
ing ennlidenee in his abiUties ntler he won the lirsi 
nmnd 

Davis placed third al ihe mall eonlesi. wliitb letl lo 
Hiady (uMiduian of KXH/-I M MM.'' lelimg him sing 
live on the air Davis wrote a jinjile ithniin (iiHidimn, 



RICK DAVIS, 

jenioi in f*od 
Kience and 
agrrcyltufot 
technology 
martagemanl, 
pet tor mi 
Thufiday, Oct 
1 6 Gi Bobby 
T's Dovi) 
opened lor 
country 

muiicion Trocy 
Byrd eodier llilt 
monlli 

StANOOWWfHITI 

\ ■lf^#.y.,l^ 



which was played on the an liet)iient)y 

"lhe> d have requests for n," Davis said "That was 
itally great " 

tot I he past year. Davis has been playing weekly al 
Kobhy r's lie siaiis playing tiicstlay nighuon CM. 2tt al 
1 ongltorns 

l)av IS is also trying to get a band together He already 
has a liddle plaver and a hass player, hut he's lotiking for 
a diuininei .md a leail guitarist or kevKtard player. 

Davis said be preters old country music to young 
I'oimtry Ills role miHlels itithkle flank Williams Sr, 
t icoige Sliail. < bus I eDoiiv and Dan Seals. 

I'ouiilrv nmsK has Ktome an important part of 
Davis' life Ik- usually practices five or si^ hours a day. 

"My gr.ides ate sull'crnii;. biit il's what I want to do," 
Davis said 

Alter he graduales in December IWK. Duvis intendN 
lo go to Njishv die lo try hiK hand in the eouniry inu^iie 
business 

"I'd love to see myself playing, but I don't know if 
nil bapjH-n, ■ D.ivc siud "1 want to try il. and I'll regret 
ilifldont" 



NUMBER9 




DILBERT 



IF YOU W*NT TO OE 
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Mi 



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. ••»--...- 1 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, Ifff 



Oatun McQuown, 

graduole student m 

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Microsoft accused of dominating software industry 
by requiring PC makers to install Internet Explorer 



ASiOCIARD KEU 

SEATTLE " Us been called the 
Evil Empire, and likened to a breed of 
"Star Trek" aliens who consume every- 
thing in their path 

Nw the Juiiticc Department is call- 
ing Microsoft Corp. a bully in ihe 
hrowsci war>. aecuiiing it of trying to 
monopolize the way we surf the 
Internet 

Mtcrosofl's years of business prac- 
tices that test the legal limits and its long 
refusal to cower to the antitrust cops 
have tm experts thinking the latest 
threat will bring the company to its 
knees. 

Even the governments attempt to 
fine Microsof) SI million a day would 
hardly sting a company that last year 
made $4 million every day — including 
weekends and (.'hnstmas 

"Microsofl has been called every bud 
name in the book." said Jim tialdcrston, 
an analyst with Zona Research Inc in 
RedwwKl City. t'aliT ■"They're pretty 
thick-skinned" 

On Monday, the Justice Dcpanment 
accused Microsoft of using its dominant 
Windows operating software, which 
runs KO pcrccnl nf pergonal computers, 
tn shut out pt)teiUial customers of rival 
Netscape's Internet br<*wscr The gm- 
crnmenl said Microsoft requires IH' 
makers that install Windows 'ii un their 
products to sell 11 with Microsoft's 
browser. Iniernel Explorer 

Moreover, Microsof\ is accused of 
threatening P( manufacturers who 
sought (It alter its Explorer browser with 



terminating ihcir licenses for Windows. 

The department's aniiiru.st division 
asked a federal judge (o hold Microsoft 
in contempt of a IW5 court order bar- 
ring the Redmond. Wash -based compa- 
ny from ant I -competitive licensing. The 
department wants a judge to fine the 
company SI million a day if il is found 
in contempt and continues the practice 

Microstdt says it is only giving cus- 
tomers whai they want, insisting it did 
nothing illegal and ii is confident it can 
win any court challenge 

In past run-ins wiih government, 
Microsoft softened st»me lactics that got 
it in trouble, but for the mosi part il con- 
tinued Its aggressive grab for rivals' 
business. 

For example, Microsoft now thinks 
twice about big outright acquisitions 
after authorities in IW? zapped its pro- 
posed merger with Iniun, the maker of 
(Juicken. a deal that would have helped 
It lock up ihc market for personal 
finance software. 

Hul Microsoft, despite the 1995 
court order, c«mtinued over the next two 



Meet me at Porter*r 
for Fat Thursday. 



years to strike deals with nearly every 
large PC* maker lo make its inlcmct 
Explorer easier for Web surfers to use 

than Netscape's Navigator. 

"Their business culture is not likely 
to turn on a dime just because of this 
.suit," said Hadley Reynolds, director of 
research at Delphi (. onsulting (iraup in 
Boston 

Still, that aggressive strategy could 
backfire, said Jesse Berst, editorial 
director for ZDNet AnchorDcsk, an 
online news magazine. 

B\ taking a "haughty, self-righienus 
air," Ikrst said, Microsoft is sacrificing 
goodwill and giving free positive pub- 
licity lo its competitors. 

"I think that thi.s stonewalling tactic 
of theirs is a foolish business decision 
and It comes out of pride and arrogance, 
not really thinking through what is real- 
ly going lo be best for your business." 
Berst said 

Though Bill Gales' extraordinary 
success and SIK billion fortune 
might cause some sour grapes, main 
rivals contend his company plays Iih> 




■ ITT T y f T,TTTy»yg***»**»*»*T*TTTTTTTTTl HI TWM T ■ 1¥» w 



A Reminder To All 
Arts ^ Seiences Students^. 

Enrollment time is quickly 
approaching so make an early 
appointment with your advisor. 

Arts & Sdenm Council 



nF^-m-arvvt 1 1 mmi'm'mm-mw 




We will keep you warm 
from head... 



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close lo the line ol what's permissible in 
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Microsoft's early history was charac- 
leri/ed by squabbles with IBM, Apple, 

Sm MFUCnONS, Page 12 



SPMN6 BREAK '98 



CANCUN MA/>ATI,AN 
SOUTH PADRE JA.MAICA 



LOWEST rai CES 61/^ftAt^lTEED! 



FREE 



-ALL INCLUSIVE" 

PARTY PAK 



ORCANIZE A SMALL GROUP 

' 1-800-5URF5-UP 

nw« siin1piiif^liip«.siniii 







tw^ hi^JC DAY 

Taco Basket $1.50 

IVco Salad S3.49 

Loaded Nachos $3.49 

R & B Burrito $3.49 

Poco Burrito $3.49 

Coronas & Margaritas 

^^ $1.99 

105 N, 3rtl 
Manhattan, KS 

776-9879 

Y«ur (JtmntoH n 

wildcat headquarters 

tradition since 1951 



3obby T&W 



iregJay 







Open Mike Nite 

Any ^cjf, Pi^' jf ' , "^r -*, ' r e ' y 'ir^ ;lr Coie 
*\Q (*m. «^v f ! 0) 

Friday JlT 

T.G.I. F Buffet 4:30-7 p.m. 
AH U Car) Eat VZ 

Eyery Friday and Saturday 



LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 



$1.50 Shot & $2.00 Prink Specials 

•ry Tues. is the rebroadcaeted K,-5t-ate Football Game 
Satrtln^ ^t. 6:30 p.m. DON'T MISS OUT! 

g'obt';y rtj » CaniJIgwopJ Shopping Lfnlfr * 537-55^:^3 






K 



The men of Kappa Sigma 

would like to thank their 

Homecoming partners 

Alpha Delta Pi and Theta Xi 

for a great Homecoming week. 



I A Al I 0H A An 0£ AAH 0E A Aft ©E A An 0E 
M I (-); A.\n 0H A AH BE A AH OH AAFI BE A A 



Li RECREATIONAL i 
If SERVICES 



Intramural Entry Deadline 



Cross Country 
and 

Inner Tube Water Polo 

Thursday. October 23, at 5 p.m. 
Recreational Services Office 



Recreational Services Office 532-6980 



BURKE'S SHOES 

LIQUIDATION 



ummm^ 



L^ivt<V<iA.m»«>nmn'f 




BAR «OflLG«?*U 



Sumo Siiil 

Mecliaiiioal Bull Kit ling 

Friday Niglit! 

|{i(l**s Start iit K p. in. 

$1 IVlixtil Drinks Tonight 



f. f f j ' ^H tii^iiiinirjr r n rrn -rT r^ rrrrrr ii jn nt-nvm-nvniivi rrrrrrv > uirf 



ATTIK M VIARS Wl Mil CLOSINtt A UOUIBATIHO 
OUa INTiai INVINTOaY* f IXTURIl 

m ^ fP'^'H Frtif rff riff f ypi*f 

MIH'f ,WOMIN'* A CHIIAtlN'S 
ffAMOUt BRANO tHOH 

MAMKiD OaWM fOM QUICK. MAUfI 



2S'*/o to 80**/o off! 



TRIMIHDOUS SACRIPICII 

aurm $to€K - KvaMYTMiM^ ooaan 



OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY, Oct. 23 & 24 

9:00 am to 9:00 pm 




ER SALE! 



Hot Brand Names! 
latest Fall looksl 

Save 25^ - 



70 



% 



100% Wool & Wool Blond 

BiAZEl^ 




Assortsd solids, plaids and twesds. 
H\i(iy, i)MnU(l6$ timittd 



BUHKE'S SHOES 

TOWN CINTIII MALL 
mAMHMTMi, KMHBAM 



Ifi^liiMi 
4 :i)iiil»ciii> 



/ 



EAST MANHATTAN 
(Ni'Kl to H;istint|<: m K M.itt Cniilt-tl [ Huvny ?'l Plionc 539 30ntt 



■ ^ o^l » ■ I 



1 



DEADLINES 

Claiiit^ed odi must be ploc«d 

by noofi 1^ ckiy be(ofe liw 

dolt you want yout od to run 

Cloulfiecl disploy od» must bt 

ploctd by J p m two working 

doyt prtoi lo ibe dote you 

want yout od (O run 



f 

QOfSTONSl 
GUI U14S95 



KANSAS STATE COILEGIAN 




THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1997 



CLASSIFIED AD WRITING TIPS 

^ Litl ilwnt or i«rvk«i fiint. Atwoyi put wfiai item 
Of service you ore odvertismg fust Thii heipi polen- 
liol buyers (inri what they are looking (or 
Don't UM abbr«v)frtioni. Many buyers ore con 
Fui«d by obbrevtolioris 

Consider including tho pric* This lells buyers il 
tbey ate Icraking ot lomething in their pnce fonge 



II 



I 



sj^l! 



BULLETIN BOARD 



01C 



Announcomonts 

M CASH FOR COLLEGE 
M GRANTS AND SCHOL 
ARSHIPS AVAILABLE 
FROMSPONSORSm 
GREAT OPPORTUNITY 
CALL NOW 1<800)&37-8890 

IMS nOVAL PURPLEI 
Ihircha** on* KMtny. 
Stop by 103 K*dn«. 
•uv now for only 
k34.M. 

ADVANCED FLIGHT 

TRAIMNQ (inm 7000 
hour ATP in«tructo< Mutli 
angmo ATP thr ougti tinQle 
engine pfivAte. Hugh Irvin. 
539-3128 

DAVIS IWOVES spscial 
timg in coiT^rTitirciat and 
f Hilda ntiAl mavofl. Vou 
pack, we move We wilt 
ICMKi your truck or trailer, 
539-3996 

oiDYouFoitorr 

YOUR 1997 ROYAL 
PURRLE with CD ROM? 
PMi H up TODAY in 
103 K*dii* TiMv ccn 
etlll b* purch«i*d, 
wtitio BupplioB la«t for 
lint tI9.9S. 

DR. LOVES AdultVideo 
CMMtte nenlati & Sales 
CD ROMS, book (tore, 
lefllher novelliea and toyi, 
12p,m, fip m. Monday Itiru 
Satuidflv Must Iw IH 10 
Enter OR. LOVES A EX- 
OnC DANCERS. INC. A 
Beer Bei. lemnlp dancers 
needed Must tie it to en 
ter. Tuesday thru Satur- 
day flp m Up m. 539 
0190. tinpJfWww kan 
sas neb - driova* E nuit. 
drtova«@ltansai. net 

L£ABNTOI=LVIKStatB 
Flying Club tias five air- 
planaa. lowaet ralea. For in- 
forniation call 539-3^33. 

WflLO RIRD SEED SALE: 

OclPber special. 50 pounds 
btadi 0>t aunflowar S12 
10% att all bud leedeis and 
tiundreds to ctiooie from 
Wtid Btrrt CompafTV 110% 
Waieis iw«t t<i P«ts N Sintl 



Lost and Found 



Found adt can bo 



BLACK CAT wiiti white 
paws lou nil It yours, 
please call 639- 7938 

FOUND: OOG around Sun 
set and AnatKlon Oct. U. 
large brown lemsle dog, 

sonlBct 77ft-099I. 

LOST EVtGLASSES, Wuo 
wire frame. t>ifrKBis m a 
snap case, on or near 
toulhside o( campus 

MALE QFIAV and wtiite cal 
tound Approximately two 
years old. very siunny. pos 
sible broken teg or hip. Haa 
been hit by a i^r 
call TJ6-203& 



P«rBos-n-Mor» 

ADDA eitta touch ot class 
to your nexl party! Call 
Wayne's Water Party lor 
portable hoi tub rental ■ 
S37 7587 

ADO A splash lo your neit 
bath. CntlWei N Wild Hot 
Tub's lor your neirt party at 
(9131537 1825 




For Ront- 
Apts. Fy ml shod 

ONE.TWO, Ihraa b«l^ 
room, also sludio nine 
nwnth laaass available. Im- 
ryiediate poaaeasion. Clean, 
quiet, central location! 
rT>o(l uti lilies paid 
S37-«389 

SEEKING FEMALE room 
mate to takeover tease in 
January Brand new fur 
nished lour bedroom 
apartrnani at Univsrtily 
Comrrwns IMindertuI 
roprTimatai IhtI, moving 
inlY? grerrk housing. CatI 
Annette, 539-5573 

SIX MONTH lease, one 
<t)edroom basement apart' 
meni. Newly redacoraied. 
washer/ dryer, utilities 
paid. U3il month. 
539-8827 

UNIVtRSITY COM- 
MONS nnoirmialei 'lead 
ed. Savoral two- bedroom 
spanmenit needtrig a aac 
ond foommato Fulty hjr 
mslMd. many strident serv- 
ices, individual leases. 
• call S39 MT1 



"aJtfiiy III 
catiss Ai; the 

Ujil7s:sity** 

•New 

• Fully Furnished 

• 2 & 4 Bedroom 

• Alarm System 

• Swimming Pool 

mm Leasing 
539-0500 

INIVKRSIT V 



n 



APARTMENTS 
2215 COLlEGt AVE 

iiol 

For Ront- 

Airt. 

UnfumlaKod 

»95$310 0NE BEDROOM 
apartments availabta now 
and Jan. t. No pets 587 
0399 

AVAILABLE NOWm Slu 
dio apadmeni is within 
walltirtg diMance lo uni 
vertitv. Everythrng elec' 
Inc. water' Irasb paid 
539-6318 01637 8228 

AVAILABLE ONE. two, 
three, tour tiedrooms. nice 
apartments near campus 
wilb great pirces First 
month free 637 1666 

CLEAN. ONE-BEDROOM, 
no pels, water, trash and 
OSS paid Call 539- 1975. 

CUTE. ONE BEDROOM 
afiartment close to KSU 
campus 413 N 17ih. 1385/ 
mortth with water/ trash 
paid Laundry lacilitres lo 
caled on site. Kitchen com 
plete wilh stove, lelrig 
erator. and dishwasher. 
Don't wait I Call MDI 
776-380* 

LAflGE THREE BEDROOM, 
two iMths. one block lo Ag 
gieville and campus All 
utilrties paid Private park- 
ing. CallLoriPti 537 7991 

NOW LEASINO. One lo 
thrtie LK^itiiKiiTi apart 
menls/ houses naar KSU. 
S225 to $650 AHIanoa 
Praparty Managamant 
S3»-«397 



1 Bedrooms First 
Month FREE 

(!.ill fiir J;tily 

\pri.ial * liiniiL'J 

niimbit S39-29SI 



OCTOBEH AVAILABILITY 
at 1005 Btiiemont Ave, 
Or>e tMdropm. $3%/ 
month. Water and trash is 
paid Close to campus. Call 
MDI 776.380« 

ONE.TWO, three bed 
room, also itudio nine 
month leatat avsilabla. Im 
niadiiala poaaaeaion Clean, 
quist, cgnlral locatrons 
n^ost uiilrties paid. 
537-8389 



ApartmrHt 
Living At In Best 
i-arge 2'Hetlroomt 
/ s 

Sindslone Aptt. 

C Cambridge Sq, Apti 

^ J 

HiU 
investment 

^ 5J7-9064 ^ 

ONE BEDROOM APART 
MENT available tmma 
diately Jusi across the 
siresi Irom campus al 1807 
Cdlaga Heights. t39V 
month. Strive, ratrigeralor, 
and dishwasher included 
water and trash |>sid 
Laundry facilities located 
on arte. Call MDI to viawl 
7TB-3B04, 

SICK OF your roomnialas? 
Take over lease on one 
bedroom apadment two 
blodia from campus on 
Sevetaenit) street. Call 
776-380*. 

TWO- THREE BED 
ROOMS One block lo cam- 
pus Very nice with all 
arr^nitias Reasonat>le 
rent 539- MM 1 

TWOBEDROOMARWT 
ME NT within walking <llt- 
tanca of KSU Availablt 
nowl 1026 Osage. ti95/ 
month Water and iraah 
paid. Stove, refrigerator, 
and dlatvwashei Call MDI 
778-3eO« 



2 Bedrooms for 
the Price of 1 

limilcd number left 
call 539-2951 



UNIVERSITY COMMONS, 
two-bedtoon^s, one bath 
for spring aerr^ester sub- 
lease, tS23( month Call 
565 0187 

UNivERsrrv terrace 

APARTMENTS Leasing 

fen fall or summer, large 
two and throe t>edroom 
apartments wilK washer, 
dryer hookups. Pool. SS7^ 



VERY ATTRACTIVE spa 
Clous two tiedroom newly 
remolded, central air con- 
ditioning, washer/ (Jryer. 
porches, yard, water and 
tra^h paid Call after 6p.m. 
or leave a message 537' 
2805 

WAi K TO campus I TWo- 
bedroom apanment local 
ed St 1113 Benrand, S&OO 
per month, available im- 
mediate Iv Short term 
lease c>k Water and trash 
paid Has dishwasher and 
un s.iTe laundry Call for 
and oppotntment MDI 
7/6-3804 



For Ront- 

Hoiisos 

1ZTH • SLUEMOMT. 

Nice tfiree tiedroom 
house FREE washer/ dry- 
er, (font' back porcttes Wa 
ter.' tra5ti |>aiit Ona blocii 
lo f^mpua. S500 
SS7-9B03 or |7SS>2SS- 
3S1B, leave message 

BRICK HOME, new carpel, 
paini, ihree or lour- bed 
rooms with two bath, 
rooms Kitd>en appliances, 
palio, enclosed yard, close 
to campus. 539-1177: 

FOUR BEDROOM HOUSE, 
915 N tifh slFeet, no pets, 
available first of January. 
$700 539 «277 

HOUSE FOR lanlal 1130 
Pomeroy Four t>edroom, 
two bath, with study 
tSOCV month, Iraah paid. 
Ckiae lo campus. WMtitf/ 
Dryer hookups. No pels. 
Call MD) 7 76- 3804 

MUST SEE this IhreabMl 
room house Twobalh, 
full finished basement, 
$525 Call 539 3998 or 
776-4839 tielore Sp.m.. ask 
for Jsson 

TWO THREE BEDROOM, 
split level, clean Imme 
diate posaeaaion, New cen 
tral air and hMtirtg. laun 
dry hook-ups, garage 
Carnputtwo miles 
537-8389 

TWO BEDROOM. ONE 
bath, washer/ dryer, air 
conditioned Close to cam 
pus Brand new $400f>lus 
uttlitiei 1129 Clatlin 
639 8673 oi (785l842-e«73 



Ri»oniinite 
Wanted 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed for apsdmenf neiri 
semester, January July 
Nice enyironment and 
friendly roommates. Janu- 
ary rem is free 565-9439. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to 
share ctean. nice two bed 
room apartmsm. Close to 
campus plusAggiavllla. 
S2S0 plus one half utilities 
Deitdre, 537-1793;/ 532 
6061 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share twro-bad 
room furnished apartrtMnl. 
close to campus Call 
Mary lor details 776-8728 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
warned to share four- bed 
room, two bath duplex, 
one block from campua, 
Call 639-6494 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
warned. Woodway Apart 
menis S2G5 a month plus 
one half bills, leaaa until 
June1998M303l7St-1g41 

FIRST MONTH and one 
half free Free KSU park 
ing permil. Ouiet, very 
nice apartment. Move in 
finals week January, 
539-8977 

NON SMOKING ROOM 
MATE lor responsible 
male. Laundry, cable. SI 40 
plus ulililiea 539-2468 

ROOMMATE WAf^TEO lor 
Two iMdroom house. Non 
smoker. S220 per month. 
Waler:trash paid Call 776- 
7823 



Subloaso 



AVAILABLE IMME 
DIATELY, one bedroom 
apadn^nl $370/ month 
piuB gas and alsclrw. 
Clot* to campus I Call 
7T6-S135 



WANTED to take over 
lease t2S(k month plus 
one third utilities. Three 
bedrooms and two tiatha. 
Close to campus. Call 
776^461 

SUBLEASER NEEDEOI 
Room svaitabia in four- 
bedroom house, very close 
to campus Washer and 
dryer. 1015Claflin Call 



JessrcB. 539-1828 or 539 
1239 

TRAILOR HOME bedroom 
Female, non. smoker. 
January May. SICK) a 
month plus one third utili 
lies Call Michelle. 
776-^504 




Rosumo/ 



539-5998 FOR all typing, 
editing, proof reading. 
tape transcripton, tpapers. 
thesis, dnaaitalion, books, 
reaumaa, coverlMMial. 30 
plus years experience. 



NEED I 

TYPCD7 I'll type papers 
lor $1 per double -spaced 
page I can also type 
resumes. Chcxise one of 
my styles for $15 I'll create 
your style for S20 Call 
Wanda at 532-0724 7:30 
a.m.- 3:30 p.m. or leave 
voice rtwil. 

3151 

Dosktop 
Publlshifig 

SEIKO COLORPOINT Dye 
Sub combo wax thermal 
color primer New in twx 
Never used S2995 Lists at 
$8000 Call 776 5999. 

2401 



■HuslctwiB/Piis 

FRATERNITIES. SQRORI 
TIES, Student Organiia 
Irons, and Clubs Book I ha 
best audio and visual Disc 
Jodrey »how availebte. 
CSiC Energy has the hjgh 
esl quality lighting and 
sound on the market to 
day. 3000 watts ol power 
featuring the most current 
music released. Competi 
live prices call 
l3iei492'1U1 and leave 
message for a price quole. 

2H| 

AdtomoUvo 
Ropsir 

AUTOGRAFT 20 IB Service 
Circle behind WalMan. 
Specializing in Nissan Dat 
sun. Honda, Toyoia, Sub- 
aru, Hyundai and Matda 
537 -50^ 



2SBl 



Othor 



COMPREHENSIVE MAJOR 
Medical Coverage for short 
or continuous terms for 
more information call 
539-6949 

LOSE iTh MORE 

WEIGHT... and 48^q more 
fat! Pyruvate has 25 years 
clinical testing at a ma|or 
US Medical School Prov 
en to lose mora weight 
foster artd keep it offi All 
natural, safe Call 888 839 
9698 




Molp Wonted 



S1500V^EKLV potential 
mailing our circulars. No 
ExperienceRequi red F rae 
information packet Call 
410783 8172 

SeOOt WEEKLY SU per 
envelope Send self ad 
d(«s*ed stamped en vet 
opa: GMA. RO Bon 13486, 
Atlanta, Georgia 30324 E 
mailGENMAR 
KETt^aot com 

ADMINISTRATIVE AS- 
SISTANT: Administrative 
assistant needed for last 
paced construction office 
tn the Manhattan/ ft. Riley 
area starting December 
1997 Must be able to 
work mciependantly ar^ 
well wrth others General 
duties include Typing cor- 
respondence, repods. con 
tracts, etc.. Payroll, Invoic 
ee. Maintaining chadi 
txjok. certified payroll, an- 
swering phones, titing and 
purchasing supplies lor ffw 
office. Experience in Ml' 
erosoftWindows96, Lotus 
l23andAS400aplus Sal- 
ary commensurate with an 
parlance Pleaa* send te- 
surrte lo M A. Modanson. 
RO BoK 1546. Columbia. 
MO 86205. Attn : Dale Het 
er. 

ADMISSIONS RIPRR- 

SEPTTATIVE. Kansas 
State Umversrtv Is racrtiit- 
ing for the po«ltlon of Ad- 
mrasiona Representative 
wfio wMI be raaponsibla for 
the davtiopmaitt and Im 
ptotnantailon «t an «fta«- 
tiva mlnorjly atudani re- 



cruitment program. This 
position would be as- 
signed additional recruit - 
rrwm activities in a specific 
geographic region The 
major responsibtlitie* in- 
clude coordinating strate- 
gy and resource people for 
the region, sarving as the 
primary recruitment rep 
resentative, developing 
and maintaining service re 
lahonshipB with high 
schcxils and community 
colleges: attending maior 
community events: and co- 
ordinating efforts for the 
region with K State (acuity 
anid staff Oualifications 
for the posnion include a 
recent K State bachelor's 
degree (December 1997 
okay); familiertty and ex 
citement for K State, dem- 
onstrated student in - 
volvement/ leadership in 
mull icull oral activities; 
strong comrriunicatron 
Skills loral/ wnttent: strong 
social skills for a variety of 
situations: willingitess lo 
travel extensively, a valid 
driver's license, ability to 
work independently, and 
overall high energy level 
and enthusiasm Positron 
will Stan on or before Ds 
camber 16, 1997 and pay 
$2 1. 000 for 12 months 
Candidates should send a 
letter of applicalion, re 
some, tranacriptisi, and 
ItM names, addresses, and 
teis phone numbers ol 
three references to; 
Saarcfi CommlH Ii . 
N*w Student Servicaa. 
Kansas State Universi- 
ty, 122 Arntorson Hall, 
Manhattan. KS BSBOS 
Review ol applications will 
begin on October 31, 1997. 
and will continue until the 
position has tHien filled. 
Kansas Stale University is 
an affirmative action, equal 
opiran unity employer. 
KSU encourages diversity 
among its employees 

ARRANGE VOUfl Spring 
semester job now Kaw 
Valley Greenhouse, tnc is 
interviewing now to start 
in Decemtwr, Jenuary or 
February Enioyable work 
atmosphere, competitive 
pay and opportunity Call 
776-8585 between 3:00 end 
4:30p,m. 

CAN WETALK? Want a 
part tune |ub that pays lull 
time' Want a guaranteed 
hourly wage, plus t>onu3 
es7Than call maf M- F. 
1pm - 9pm. SB7-41I4 ask 
lot Sharon. 

COMPUTER INFOBMA 
TION Specialist 1*304). Part 
or Full-time, temporary po 
sit ion. not lo exceed 12 
mor^s. in the Department 
of Agronomy BS- degree 
in computer scierKe plus 
sik months experienca with 
Ctf, Visual Basic, and 
WirHlows 3-1/96 Knowl- 
edge of forage manage- 
ment and/ or cow-calf pro- 
duction systems helpful 
but not required Send let 
ter of applicstion, resume, 
transcripts, and arrange for 
three letters of reference to 
be sent to: Dr (Serry L 
Poaler. Heed, Department 
of Agronomy, Throckmor 
ton Ptant Sciences Center. 
Kansas State University, 
Manhattan. KS tM506 SSOI 
Applicalion deadline Oc- 
tober 29. 1997 Kansas 
State Universilv is an Al 
firmativa ActiorV equal op 
port unity employer KSU 
encourages diversity 
among its employees 

EARN FREETmPS S 

CASHI CLASS TRAVEL 
needs iludenis to Firomote 
Spring Break 19981 Sell 15 
trips & trswBl trr»i Htglllv 
motivated students can 



SlO.OOOt Choose Can 
cun, Bahamas. Matailan. 

Jamaica, or Flondal North 
America's largest student 
tour operator t Call Nowl 
1 800-638 641L 

PART TIME SECRETARY/ 
bookkeeper for local home 
builder Some experience 
with compiiteri/ed ac 
counting preletable- 
53»-«e40or556 43ia 

l%RT TIME WORK tor col 
lege students Make your 
own schedule Earn up to 
SeO $200/ per week Prov 
an resume builder for all 
maiors Scholarships, in- 
tarships, co ops avertable 
Conditions apply Work in 
Manhattan Interview al 
personnel office inTopeks. 
Call 1786)228-1144. M'F. 
12 4pm 

SECOND SHIFT Student 
Operata r Individual wo uld 
be required lo work one 
night a week I M F I 4p.m. 
Ilam. (this samealer It's 
WIsdnasday night): on* 
lunch shift a weak. IM F) 
11a.m.- 1p.m. Ithis semes- 
ter it'sTbursday). and a 
weakand rotation ot Sat- 
urday tOa m 6p.m and 
Sunday noon to midnight 
(with a three hour break) 
one or two weekends e 
month, and working for 
full time stsff when they're 
sick or on vacation Start 
ing salary is $5 40 per 
hour. Applicafions and 
complete job description 
Bvaitit)le from Room 14, 
Hale Library Applications 
ac«eplad until 5p.m., 
W34/B7 For further in- 
formalion, call Gloria Ro- 



bettson ot Elaine Heller al 
532 4941 

TEMPORARY PART TIME 
and weekend help needed 
for furniture delivery 
Please a|>piy m person at 
Homestead Rental. 2332 
Sky Vue Lane One block 
south of Holiday Inn Holi 
dome 

THOROUGH HOUSE clean- 
ing for cou|>le with no pets, 
smoking, children. Flexible 
schedule Adjacent I o cam 
pus Respond with letter 
and qualifications to Col 
legten box 1 

UTILrrv SILUNO CO- 
ORDINATOR: City of 
Maiihanan. Kansas Ipopu 
lation 44,000) is currantley 
seeking to fill a Regular 
Full-time position ol Utility 
Billing CcK>rdina1or Start 
ing Salary IS 21/ hour. 
(IXX}), plus excellent tien 
efits This position con 
tributes to the operation of 
the Customer Service 01 
fice by assisting the Cos 
tomer Service Supervisor 
in the overall coordmation 
of the utilily billing opera 
tion. Bachelors degree in 
public adrriinislrstion. busi 
ness administration, man 
agement. accounting, or re 
laled field preferred. How 
ever, relevant experier>ce 
may be substituted lor ed- 
ucation Experience in 
PC's and mini computers 
ia required. Experience in 
cuelomar relations is de 
sirat}le. Experienceinsu 
pervision IS also desirable. 
A complete job description 
indicating knowledge, skill 
and abilities is available by 
request. Apply at the De 
pari me ni ot Human Re 
sources, 100 Manhattan 
Town Center, Suite 545, 
Manhattan, KS 66502. no 
later than Tuesday. Octob 
er 28, 1997 by 5 OOp m. 
EOE MfF OID 

WANTEDTUTORS lor Piin 
cipte ot Macroeconomics 
(ECON 1101, Intermediate 
Microeconomics (ECON 
5201. Environmental Geog 
raphy 1. Accounting F^ch: 
and Contract lACCT 331). 
IS SO/ botjr lor undar- 
graduate and STOO/ hour 
for graduate students with 
out asaistantships Com 
plete application at Hotton 
201 



Buslnoss 
OpportMn ltlos_ 



EARN MONEY and FREE 
TRtPSH Absolute Best 
SPRING BREAK Padiagas 
available 1 1 INDIVIDUALS. 
Student ORGANIZATIONS, 
or small Gf^OUPS wam 
edfl Call INTER CAMPUS 
PROGRAMS al 1800- 
327-6013 or 
bItpJ/WWW cipt com 




ttems for Sal* 



I ROYAL PURPIEI 



I l»V 103 Kadzta. 



•24.SS. 

AffnOUES, COLLECT! 
BLES. tools, books, furni 
ttrre. estate (ewelry, bear 
signs, thousands uf cun 
ous goods Time Macfiina 
Antique Maul and Flea 
Market 4910 Skywey Dr. 
tHtween Briggs and air 
|]on 539-4684 

CABLE DE SCRAMBLER kit 
St4.95. See all the premi 
um end pay. per view dtan- 
nets 1800)752 1389. 



HAVE AN IDEA FOR 
ltAU.fiWEEN> 

Orsntfou'i Tnuifc 

has a lot of clotlMS 

tMA od<U snd mMla 

toirtckli 



'J I* Ij 11 Ij UJ b ' J ''J' J" U Jj J'. 



11*4 PinskwT Dr. 



K STATE PURPLE or GOLD 
GLITTER. 100 pound 
drums. S75/ drum, you 
haul, samples 785-843 
1S0S, forcade#compu 
serve com 

SELLING ALL my oil paint- 
ing stuff. Soma new, soma 
used Call 776-5999 

WWW SUPERIORA 
CUflACOM VIEW our en- 
tire lina of new AND pre 
ownedAcura's Ask for Pa- 
trick J. Stainer »1 rated 
Acur* web site in the na 
tiont 

41B| 

Pumlturo to 
■«^/toll 

JCWrrS WHOLESALE 
CARPET Carpet remnants 
and vinyl remnants 504 
Yuma Monday- Friday. 
8:30a.m.- 5:30p.m. Sat. 
8a. m - 12pm. Open to the 
public 

4»| 



Computors 

MONITOR REfWR. quick 
and reliable service Free 
pick up and delivery. Call 
Inland 776-0311. 



Pots and 



COOK BOOKS. Vintage li 
Cense lags, encyclopedia's, 
black memorsbilia, church 
windows, oriental turnitur 
and potary. Vintage maga 
tines. t>ooks, raliguous, 
hats, ladioi. clocks, auto, 
toolo. camarM, •fbtims, fut- 
niture, potarv. aatala |ew 
airy. American heritage 
books, movie stills, tavern 
stuff, brass, trunks, mill 
tary. tins, stems. SO's furni 
lure, flute, prints, floor 
lamps, new car trailer 
$1499. new &« 9 tilt trailier 
$699. aOOO Square leet ot 
curious goods. Tinta Ma 
chine Antique and Flea 
Market. 4910 Skyway Dr 
between air((M)rt and 
Brigga Visa, MattarCard. 
layawey 639-4884 open 
12:00p.m 6:00pm Tues 
day thru Saturday 



BABV UMBRELLAS. Blue 
and gold Macaws, Hahnns 
Macaws, sweet, fun. cuddly 
rare Love Birds. Codiatiles, 
539-1177 



Sporting 
Kqulpmont 



GOVERNMENT SUR 
PLUSH Camouflage cloth 
ing, boots, rainwear, wool 
clothing Also CARHARTT 
WOftKWEAR Monday 
Friday 9am 5:30pm Sal 
urrtay 9a.m 5p.m St 
Marys Surplus Sales, SI. 
Marys, Kansas, 1786)437- 
2734 



4M| 

Tickots to 
Buy/Soil 



KSUVS KUsndKSUva 
Colorado tidiet two lo 
three tickets General ad 
mission. Sail to highest 
bidder Call539-36». 

LASTTWO home gam* 
football lickels for sate. 
Call 19131 776-9353 

SELLING FOUR KSU KU 
footlMlt tickels Taking 
best offer by October 31 
CalU316>492 1521 and 
leave message with an off' 
er Seats are located m the 
north end zone, general ad- 
mission 

WANTED K STATE vs. 

Cnloredo tickets. Will buy 
any number of tickets Call 
collect (9131829-7350. ask 
for Mary. 



1979 FORD LTD station 
wagon. 537 - 2822 after 
Spm. Use tor hunting, 
fishing and tailgale picnics 

1989 JEEP Cherokae. good 
condition, six cylinder. 
$6500,539-9239 

1985 MUSTANG GT con 
vedihle cuBtorrnred Too 
many new parts to list. 



Must seel S5SO0 or tiest 
offer 587-9271 

GOODYEAR MUD siut 
snow tires 1 7 inch. BOOO 
miles. Asking $550 Coll 
Al at 537-2092 

TOYOTA CAMHY 1983. 
four cylinder, automatic. 
maQS, air, power steering. 
povirar brakaa, power wind 
ow«, lio ruM, good tires, 
200K miles $1000 or best 
offer, 539^065 



BIcyclos 



SPECIALIZED M2 Iramesel 
plus tree extras Excellent 
condition £360 oi best olf 
er Cal) Al at 537 2092 

S30I 



MotoTcyctes 



1991 HO f^ DA 750 Night 
hawk Red Excellent con- 
dition 13.000 miles, $2SD0 
or tiest offer. Call 
539 7685 

1994 KAWASAKI Ninfa 
250 Black, purple. 
585-0242 

1995 HONDA CBH 600 f 3, 
white/ purple/ yellow, tow 
mites, excellent condition, 
SS250 or twst offer 
565-9150 

FOR SALE Yamaha 1992 
Seca. red. sharp. S2999 or 
best offer 539 6293 




(SIP® 



TRAVEL/TRIPS 



615| 

Spring 



ftPftl»«0 BREAK Oa^ M;i 

; el I an With ConpvjnTcHiis 
Airfare. fi«vmi Mights hatel, 
tranalerii, parlioii for 
bfcxifijfu ur onniip^y FREE 
tfip 1 t»00 395 489e 
(ww^fv (-'f3M«y*»ttiHT5.i;niTil 

SPRtNO BREAK •«' Free 
food and dtinksi Cancun, 
Bahtmaa, Jamaica and 
Florida horn $399 Organ 
ire a small group and trnv 
I el frael Highest commii 
sions and lowest prices' 
Call Surfs Sun Tours to 
become a campus repre 
sentstive (8001574 7577 

"SPRING BREAK "Take 
2-" Hiring flepsl Sell 15. 
Take 2 Free Hottest Desti 
nationst Free Padies. Eat& 
and Drinks. SunSplastr 1 
800 426^7710 




iwi-mkUfi 



ViUliBEJIVERCREBr 

i^suTnchase 



iM Hw ■«* tf otno .■4^>c;hooii two 



ClossifiedRATES 
1 DAY 

20 vMfd) Of teis 

J7I5 

Mch word gvet 20 

$.20 p«r word 

3 DAYS 

20 wi^nJi or lets 
tB.40 

Mch word OMf 20 

t.25 p«r wtytj 

3 DAYS 

20 words or less 

(9 45 

•och word ovet 20 

$,30 per wofd 

4 DAYS 

20 wordi or leji 

110,20 

•och wixd oyar 20 

$.35 por wofd 

9 DAYS 

20 wordi ot lesi 

$10.70 

•och word ov«r 20 

$40 per word 

j conteculive doy role { 



HOW TO PAY 

All cbuiffedt muit be 

paid in odvonce unlsu 

you hove on account 

wilh Student 

Pgblicofioni Inc. 

Coih, clieclt. 

MasferCard or Vila ore 

occepied There it a 

$10 service charge on 

all refurnad chacki 

^ teietve fhe right to 

edit, rejecf or properly 

claiiify any od 



FREE FOUND ADS 

As o set vice to you, we 

rt^n found odt lor three 

days free of chorge 



COtRICnONS 

H you find on error in 

your od. please call us 

M occept re)|x>ntibil> 

ty only for itie firsf 

wrong interlion. 



CANCELUnONS 

If you sell your ilem 

before yotjr od has 

expired, \Me will refund 

you for the retftomihg 

doys You mutt call ui 

befofv noofi fhe day 

befof* ihe ad IS to be 

published. 



HEADUNES 

Fof on extra charge, 

we'll pvt o heodline 

above yout od fo catch 

fhe reoders atlentlofl 



OQO 



BULLETIN BOARD 



ri'j 




We "Knead" You! 



Ntfw York &agcl Cafe is now hiring 
for ALL positions for our riisw 
location in Manhattan. Great 
hours and a lot of fun! Pick up 

your application now! 

!219 &luemont 

Manfiflttan. KS 66502 

(913) 4^6-7192 or 539-2200 



TO PUCE AN AD 

Go to ICediie 103 
(ocrots from the K -Stale 
Student Unton) Ofhct 

hotm ote Mofidoy 
through f rktoy From 8 

om lo 5 p.m The 

oKlct it opon except 

on holidoyi 



miiMik 



12 



KANSAS STATE COUEOIAN 



THURSDAY, OCTOBEK 23, 1997 




RYAN REIM wnlet a note on hii hand while dJKussing tfia morning's chores w 
cion at tht dairy reMorch unit. Raiff works 1 B hours a week ot a doiry plus 10-1 



JiFT COOMI/Cdbgion 
iih Becky Pushoe, griimo) science techni- 
5 hours on weekends doing form lobot 



Milking 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 
have 10 uwk with the call I l- a litllc 
morc 10 keep them from being frost- 
bitten" 

Rciff said the job ttus good for 
students who didn't have lime to work 
during the day. but hours can be 
unprcdictahli: »s well 

"One night I v,as d(»wr (o my last 
eight cinvs when the ptjwer went out 
I h;id no idea *hal happened Instead 
of getting done early. I was there until 
one in the morning, and 1 had to be 
hack at fi am." he said 

Working ul other dairies helped 



RcifT pick up K-State's milking pro- 
cedure quickly, said Richard Scoby, 
research assistant at the Dairy Unit 

"He's a gwid wortcr," Seoby said. 
"We give him quile a bit of responsi- 
bility milking, feed and other jobs 
around the unit. He's doive just about 
everything" 

Scoby said sometimes the dairy 
needs workeni at a moment's notice. 
and Rctif was helpfuf 

"He's very willing to come in and 
help uul in a pinch." he said 

Milking cattle isn't something 
ReilT warns lo do the rest of his life. 
He would like to go into herbicide nr 
seed sales He also wouldn't mind 
fanning some on the side. 



"I love to farm. I've been drying 
tractors and helping around the farm 
since I was 5 faille were always a 
way to gel through ihc w mier and for 
something else to do." Reiff said 

Reifl' said he wasn't the type of 
person to find a jtih w here he'd have 
lo do lab or olfice work all day Ik- 
likes keeping busy I le also likes the 
people he works with and learning 
more about a field in agriculture that 
isn't directly rclaled to his degree 

"Not being an animal science 
major, the dairv gives me more 
know ledge of agriculture." KeilT said. 
"It's also a giMHl way to make extra 
money during ihe week to help pay 
for schwji." 



Boeing 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

some 737 production lo try lo unscram- 
ble problems caused by its aiiempi lo 
more than double the number of aircrafl 
ii makes. 

"if you judge by the number of peo- 
ple they've hired and the siie of the 
writeoff, the problem is greater than 
they anticipated and Wall Street antici- 
paied" said Bill Whitlow, manager of 



the Safeco Northwest fund. 

So much work was being done out of 
sequence on the 747 assembly line in 
Everett. Wash., thai BiK'ing halted it for 
20 working days to catch up 

And during llight tests for Boeing's 
new -genera I ion 7.17-71X1. a Haw was 
found in the horizontal siabili/er design 
Fining that forced B(x:ing to slop final 
as.semhiy on the new 7.17s for 25 days. 

Two years ago. Hoeing was turning 
out jusi 17 planes a month. Orders 
plummeted in tlie early I Wis kxause 



of a global recession and a drop in trav- 
el due lo Gulf War fears liul when air- 
lines became heal I by again, they bitughl 
planes 

In 1444. airlines ordered 12(1 Hoeing 
planes worth about S7 ^ billion. So far 
this year. Boeing has announced orders 
tor three times as many jels. .155 of 
ihem. wonh about S25 billion. 

Boeing now produces about 40 planes 
a month, with a giwi of 41 b\ nexi spring 

4K if production of neul\ acquired 
\kl)tinnell Douglas is factored in 



Dry 



Web 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

Inlernei to deliver educational programs 
lo students not living in Manhattan. 

"Thus tar I am pleased and 
impressed," llowey said. "There is, of 
course, the element of personal alien- 
ation, a necessary cv il with distance 
education. But it is just part of it and 
something that people will need lo deal 
with 

"Distance education is a fact and Me 
need to explore new ways to leverage 
the technology to educate the most stu- 
dents possible," he said. 

Ross said one advantage Ihe tioft- 



warc has over lislservs is the ability to 
edit the message that is posted as more 
information becomes available 

Ross said students don't need an e- 
mail account lo take the class, which is 
a benefit to students enrolling fn^m 
locations outside Manhattan. 

Heath Harding, multimedia special- 
ist and staff assistant for ihc College of 
t'!duealinn. said the college will not 
abandon lislservs, but Web Crossings 
does have advantages ihat listservs do 
not. 

Harding said when students log on. 
il registers them automatical ly so they 
only see the discussions they are regis- 
tered for 

"They will be used side-by-sidc. 



"1 ach one is dilferent and used lor dil- 
fereni situations 

"This sotiware allows students lo 
establish rapport in a classroom com- 
munity," Harding said "You must 
csiablish a irusi aimosphcre before peo- 
ple will talk about controversial issues 
or issues I hey feci any kind of cominn- 
menl aboul." 

Advantages over lislservs include an 
abilily lo posi a picture lo personal i/c 
messages, send mail lo a central loca- 
tion and post mail lor an entire group 

The Web t nissing also enables a 
user lo run a search on discussion sub- 
jects, sloa's messages in a central loca- 
tion, and il doesn't require a mail 
accouni 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

and talking aboul (he issue in general 
terms." Robe I said "1 think there are 
pros and cons for bolh sides of this 
issue. All components must be lotiked al 
before coming out with a dermile state- 
ment." 

Greg Davis. Intcft'raiernity Council 
president and a member of Sigma Phi 
bpsilon, said Ift would support all 
hou.ses whether they banned alcohol or 
not. 

"I think fraternities praclieing safe 
nsk management provides a safe atmos- 
phere." he said. 

Davis said IFC was giving presenta- 
tions to the fraternities and sororities to 
help educate its members soacnsiscan 
be slopped before it happens. 

He also said he supp^iried fraterni- 



RBmblor 



STEAK HOUSE 
C SALOOM 



12oz, U.S.D.A. 

Choice Top 
Sirloin, Baked 
Potato, Salad, 

Texas Toast 

$^49 

Drink Specials 

$1 Draws 



8711 E* Highway X4 
Manhattan, KS 



Joyce's Hair Tamer© 



Nail Tech 



Carrol Chaml?er5'Fi&her formerly of Crimpers has 
relocated to Joyces Hair Tamers she welcomes all 
former ani^ new cliffnt-& 
2026 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 539-TAME f &2631 










g@@ 




m 








World 
Series 


1¥iTM 




MLB 




^J. TVclitii'; 


at 


Floric ti 


■ 






$1 BOTTLES 




U 


6-7714 1119 MQRG 





HALO PRESENTA 




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feT/bmi/fig: 
RITMO LA'TINO 

Fi'fi/iirlfif) 

D.J. EL RITMO 

SalurdfivTHE25ni 
STARTS AT 9 P.M. 
MORE INFO CALL 

MSO (9)3)532 6537 

\jwn\lion. 
KAMAJIA INN PIJVZA 

tj\NI)ON ROOM 

I 7rt I fi ANDtiRSr m 

At ROSS KROIVl 

k-statk union 

(;i-;nkkw, admission 

»rioo 



Unibed VMm ...helping all ages in 

Riley County 

Thepowehof U' 




^*^ptired& Senior 




• Retired and Senfor • Manhiattan 

Volunteer Program (RSVP> Day Care 

FtDm child cor© (or sir>gie parent cjrxl low Incorrte forntltes to votunfeer 
progranvs (or our sentori Unrted Woy ogencles ptay an tmportani rote 
m our community 
Don f unc>orestlrrKJf« 'The Power of Yoo' In mofclno a dtftefencel 
>9lv«toUnM»dWcir, 



Vnittd Waf afHtttf County 

106 S. 4ih Sirwtt 

Manhattan, KS 66502 

(7nS) 77#.J77t 




WHOLESALE BEAUTY CLUB 

ami Club Beauty Sahn 

are pleased to introduce two new stylists 

fa their team. 





Carolyn Brenda 

Hair Siylist Hair Stylists and 

Nail Technician 
Call caroh'n or Brenda at 539-5999 and make an appointment today! 



Early Bird Special 

25% OFF all regular priced Salon Services 
9:00- 11 :30 a.m. Everyday 



GO CATSI FREE "Jewel Paw Print" 
with every NAIL SERVICE 

20% OFF ALL THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE 

^ -^ 

NEXXIJS & Sf -RUPUES . Buy one at regular price, 

get the setmid for 1/2 PRICE. 
SEBASTIAN Shapct &. Shupcr Plus llairspniy - I K oz. 

Value?, to ' I fi W» ONLY 1>.W 
FOUNDATION - 1 lair Sprays Reg. '2.99 ONLV 'I.M 
WINOMEKE Prelude h>.i| & Binly M.issagerONLV M.W 



1^ 



WHOLESALE BEAUTY CLUB 

Op«n B a.m. . B p.m. Mon. • Sat., 1 -S p.m. Sun. 
S3»-9M« • 4M Poynte. Manhaltan 



SHOP B Kin W iKK lOU MW SPIXIAIS! 



tics going dr> when the umlerisnuliiiite 
lx)dy votes for it. nut the nutuntul I'ruier- 
nity or alumni 

"It's the biidy they're the current 
Iralerniiy tncmbers. They make the I'ra- 
tcrnity, and it should he ^^hat I hey want 
during school." Davis said. 

Ke said all IFC emild do was .support 
and eduedic rralernities nn the practice 
of safe ri»k management. 

"You don't have to han alcohol from 
fralemiiie.s lo kmw how' to control it." 
he said 






Jenniler (iorman. Panheltcitic 
Council president and a rticmher \\\ 
Alpha (.'hi Omega, said she supp< tried 
the NPC in siippoiiiny traiernities to han 
alcohol 

Besides being a good risk manage- 
ment step for lliiise IVaternities taking 
the step lo become dry. she said it will 
also decrease liability and help in the 
recruitment process to get new mem- 
bers. 

"You can still have fun without alco- 
hol invoKed." (iorman said. 






BoWmkles 



LAST CALL 

LIVE TONIGHT 
9pin- 1 am 

•25< Draws 

•$I.SO Big Beers 

•$l All Shots 



^m^ 



\ BoWinkle's <^ 

£ • 3043 Anderson / 

\ • 776-1022 ^ ^ 



BoWinkle's : 



LAftNE HEALTH CENTER 
H4I SHOT - FALL 1997 

WALK-IN BASIS AVAILABLE: 

OCT. 16, 23 OR NOV. 6 
8:30-1 1 :30 a.m. or 1 :30-4:30 p.m. 

$6/STU DENTS 

$10/FACULTY& STAFF 

(ONLY CASH OR CHECKS 

ACCEPTED) 

ESPECIALLY RECOMMENDED for 

individuals with a chronic health disease 

such as Asthma, Diabetes, Kidney, Heart 

or Elderly 

REPORT TO ROOM 121 




Artis Quartet 

Saturday, October 25. Kp m 

Public $16 Seniors $14 Students: $« 

Sincn Its formallon in 1 9K0. thl."i Austrian frmrs«)nie has dolighted 
audionro.^ from Han^kok to Hwliii nnd won continuing praise for iw 
coiicort sorios in its hotno at Vir^nna's MtLsikverein lis awards 
include prizes at the (^umbridKn and l-:vian comprtltlims. a t!rand 
Prix du Disque and <ttsv«ral Diapasons d'Dr. 

CD Review says thfi Artis lombintts "the Intellectual rigor and hon- 
esty of the \a Salle (Juartet. Ihe suavity and tonal alliiri' ortho Quar- 
tetto Itallano, and tho Tucused power of Ihu Julliard Quartet * 

Hoar them in a progrHm of Viennese maaterworks by SchubiTl. 
Mozart, and Hrahms and you'll know why. 

Call McCain at 705-532-642a 

You PiiM charKP yimr iirkfi.s in VISA, MiisuirCnrd. w Dis4'iivitr Or slop by tho 
box ninco. nnnn to (> () m wonkdnys 

SThtt ArUK (Junrtol Is prnsi^ntnd in purl by Ihti Kahmm Art* ComrniKsion, it 
•iliiUt nginicy. nnd tb« NnUotml I'.iKliiwment, a Fodftrnl nitnni7 Addltlnnal 
fundmg hiis bfwtt providpd by ths' KSintn Plna Arte Pp« 



i 



^ -% l> t J 



COUJGIAN 

DIRECTORY 



vC 



532-6556 
532-6560 
5324555 





FIND OUT WHY IT'S NOT SO 
EASY TO MAINTAIN FRIENDS 

^ IMIy Fumat explains the difCicullies oF Finding and 
keeping close friends thai will lasl o lifetime 

See OPINION, Page 4 




INDEX 

In todoy'i paper 

Bfiefj .....2 

Diversions 1 T 




K-STATE UNEBACKER JEFF KEUY 
MAKING HIS MARK AS A WILDCAT 



^ On his Dec 13 birlfiday last yeof, junior transfer 
J«ff K«lly decided that he wanted to be a Wildcat 
By Chrislmos, he'd chonged his mind 

3ee SPORTS. Paqr- 6 



OcKmfi7i. 1997 
FRIDAY 




HM>H 56 



LOW 



45 



'^i :>i \^,1t' ijJIn njjii 
•hvniior.ttjtM; pcsvi 

witn rtltn (XHS'bte 



Senate sets date for stadium expansion vote 



TMWtSlfMCNa 

'Mil unln 

Sfudcni Senate approved a bind- 
ing rcfercnJuni \o(c ThurMlsiy night 
10 dci'nle the late ol sluilcni in\ olve- 
ntenl in the expansion of KSU 
Siadium 

Thrttitjjih the rel'crendum. students 
will have the opportunity to vote on 
whether Ihcy want to support the erc- 
ulion of a privilege fee to fund a p«)r- 
I inn of the expansion 

In a 4 1 - 1 3 \'Ote, student senaiiTf. 



apf)ro%eiJ a special el eel ion M:hed- 
uled for November 17 and IX. 
Polling sites will be established at the 
K-Slate Student Union and in the 
Veterinary Medicine t'omplex 

Students who vole in support of u 
privilege fee will also be asked to 
chtKvse between two plans submitted 
by the Department of Iniereollegiatc 
Alhlctics. One calls for a Ice ol 
approximately 50 cents per credit 
hour The other proposes an approxi- 
m.iik- ^ 1 -per-eredit-hour increase in 



fees It) pay for the expansion of the 
number of guaranteed student seats. 

Under the two plans, students 
would K' guaranteed 4.IMKI w HMKM) 
student seals, respcetively. Currcnily, 
7.5(MI seals are jjuaranieed Student 
fMilball ticket prices would also he 
Iro/en at SM) per game for the next 
four years 

If the SI fee is appriAed the ath- 
letic department would also create a 
special l,tHH)-seai section for recent 
graduates Alumni could purchase 



season lickcls at 6b percent of public 
cost for two years following their 
graduation. 

The department had originally 
proposed the alumni section if any 
privilege fee was approved, but 
Privilege Fee Committee Chairman 
Aaron Otto said cost was 3 factor in 
the deeisirm to cut the section from 
the 5()-cent fee plan 

"When they (the athletic depart- 
ment) Imiked further intti the number 
of seals under the smaller fee. they 



didn'i think they could guarantee the 
number of seats in the smaller plan." 
Otto said. 

The creation of a privilege fee 
must rc'ccive at least fill percent nf 
student vote to pass. 

Student Senate has final cuntnil 
over the amount of a possible fee if 
the referendum passes. Hut Otto, in 
arguing lor the hill, said he hi>pcs 
senators will use the opinion vole to 

See STADIUM, Page 14 



WHAT WILL THE NOV. 17-18 
REFERENDUM BALLOT INCLUDE? 



<A binding rwferendum vol* will ieod Ike list ol ques- 
hons It will ask whelh«f oi not the vmr supoorts establislv 
ing o privilege fee to pay iar enponding KSU Slodium 

•A ilud«fit opiniofi qMHion will be included 

Those who vote yes fo( ike privilege fee CO" choose wkelher 
ifiey prefer on opproinmole J I per credit Hour or opproJii- 
male SOcent per credit hou' fee fhii vole is flon-binding, 
ond li only a measure oJ iKe optnwi oi ihose who voted for 

Ifielee. 



Rising tuition 
puts students 
in record debt 



ASSOCIATID PIfSS 

IK>STON College stu- 
dents are graduating with 
more debt than ever, a burden 
affecting their lifestyles and 
job clHiices, according to a 
suney of 2.5()0 students in 
scleral states 

Tuition and fees 
at public and private 
colleges have 
increased an average 
of 25 perecnl lor the 
pcnod. which is one 
reason tor the stu- 
dents' debt increase 
Another factor is thai 
moreof twJay s finan 
cial aid comes in the 
form of loans rather 
than grants 

The survey was 
conducted by Nellie 
Mae. the largest non- 
profit prov ider of stu- 
dent loans In the 
country 

1>ie average total debt of 
the students studied was 
S|X,H(HI. compared with 
SX,2(K( in a comparable survey 
by Nellie Mae in IWI. the 
Boston (Jlobe reported 
Thurulay 

The survey found that the 
average debt for student bor- 
rowers who went to public 



■ Averoge dtb (or 
ttudenti wKo go lo 
pS< universities 

$13,000 

• Aneroge debt (or 
stifdcflls who 90 to 
ptivoie univetiitiei 
M7,SO0 

• Averoge dibl lor 
uudentj who go to 
groduK schoc' 
t»400 
' Artroge d*b« (or 
tit/dervli wko go to 
p^otessiorajl kW 
$41^ 



four- year colleges was 
SIJ.OtMt, compared with 
S17,5(K1 fot those who went to 
private colleges 

For those who went to 
graduate schtwil. the average 
debt was S24.5tH). and for 
those who went to a profes- 
sional school. It was S4K.5tN) 
lit >r rowing for 
graduate schools, 
especially in the 
fields of law. medi- 
cine Of business, 
prinluced the most 
dramatic increase, 
said Sandy Baum. a 
Skidmort College 
economics profes- 
sor and a survey 
consultant 
In l^K I -K2. fed- 
eral grants made up 
54,fiperceni of stu- 
dent financial aid 
and federal loans 
comprised 41 4 per- 
cent By IW5-96. 
federal grants made up only 
IV 7 percent of financial aid, 
and federal loans were only 
SKA* percent. 

Most of the students inter- 
viewed were m Mas.sachusetts. 
New York and California, 
where the cost of college typi- 

See LOANS, Page T4 



Military to examine 
photos of jet crash 



usoci«no nuM 

I nWARDS AIR FORCE 
UASl:. Calif Photographs 
taken just before a training jci 
and an F- 1 ft Tighter collided in 
llighi will be closely examined 
for clues into the accident that 
killed two crew memben>. 

The two military planes 
collided Wednesday over the 
Mojave Desert, just weeks 
aflcr the first-ever suspension 
of all military pilot training for 
a safety review The T-3H 
crashed into a remote gunnery 
range at td wards Air Force 
Base 

U.S Air Force Lt Col. 
William R Nusz and British 
Air Force Flight Ll, Leigh 
Alexander Fox. who was par- 
ticipating in a pilot exchange 
program, were killed, ofTicialt 
said 

The F.|6 had slight wing 
damage and landed safely on a 
dry lake bed runway, said Ll 
Col Boh Williams, a base 
spokesman Its two crew mem- 
bers were not hurt. 

The Air Force vwuld not 
speculate on the cause of the 
crash 

bd wards is in Southern 
California and home lo the Air 
Forec Test Pilot SchtKtl, which 
testfi military planes and is 
also a space shuttle landing 
site The F- lb and T-3K were in 



a routine Tight alongside a B- 
I bomber, taking phott^tgraphs 
to dix'umcmi the accuracy of 
dummy practice bombs, base 
spokesman John Main: said 

Instead, the pictures from 
the F-lfi might provide clues 
as to what went wrong, tl s not 
known whether any film was 
recovered from the training jet 

The collision occurred 
while the aircraft were at about 
2,70« feet. 

Tlie T-38 virtually disinte- 
grated on impact, spreading 
debris over a three-quarter 
mile area The largest visible 
portions of the twin-engine 
plane wvre one engine and the 
engines' cover The plane's 
impact created a crater about 4 
feet deep and 200 yards wide. 

Investigators said there was 
some live ordnance in the 
vicinity. 

The base immediately 
imposed a temporary halt on 
flights for its 2b F-lbs and 12 
T-3Ks, Williams said That sus- 
pension remained in elTect 
Thursday, base spokesman 
Gary Hatch said. The F- 1 6 is a 
single-engine aireraR with air- 
to-air combat and air-to- 
ground close air support roles. 
The T-38 is used by pilots to 
learn supersonic icchniques. 
aerobatics, formation and nav- 

See CRASH, Page 14 



Worldwide financial markets rocked by plunge in Hong Kong 



THE MELTDOWN 

THC HANG SENG INDEX of 

blue chip stocks in Hotvg Kong 
beelell 1 percent on Thursdoy 
For the week, ifte index is down 
23 percent 

'THE DOW JONES industrial 
overoge trickled 229 points ol one 
point, but gamed ground at ihe 
end ol the doy inching its drop 10 
186.68 points 

DU PONT was the biggest gainer 
on the day, up 1/2 point to 60 
1/8. 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 
MACHINES wos tbe lop pomt- 
losei swooning i 7/8 to 1 00 
1/4. 

— Aijoctoted Press 



USOCIATB) PtfSJ 

NtW YORK A panicky 
stock sell-off in Hong Kong 
revcrtscrated Thursday through- 
out liurope and the United States, 
where the IXrw plunged almost 
230 points before rebounding 
slightly 

It was the fifth- worst point 
drop in ihe Dow 's history, though 
not even close to the largest per- 
centage drop 

"Nobody knows which way to 
go," said Tatsuya hnomoto, chief 
foreign exchange dealer at 
Sumitomo Bank Ltd. in New 
York. 

In Mong Kong, which ana- 
lysts had believed was immune 
from the financial turmoil roiling 
the rest of Southeast Asia, the 
Hang Seng index of blue-chip 
sKKks drtvpped 10 percent for Ihe 
day, a plunge of 1 ,2 1 1 ,47 points 



10 10.426 30, 

It nt»w IS down 2} pcrceni for 
the week, following large mch- 
downs across Asian stock and 
currency markets that began this 
summer 

Hong Kong shares 
got tiff to a volatile 
start Friday as the 
Hang Seng indcs 
plunged nearly 
2(«) points. 
rebounded I % 
points and then 
ended up back 
almost lo 

Thursdav night's 
level 

■People are 
scared. Investors are 
so uneasy," Kcni 
Ross iter, senior institu- 
tional sales manager at Nikko 
Securities Co (Asia) Ltd., said 
before trading began 



Nobody 

KNOWS 

WHICH WAY 

TO GO. 



In the fallout of the ass,mll on 
sliKks in llont: Kong a bas- 
tion of capitalism in .'\sui despite 
China's takeover in July ma|or 
sirvk indexes fell mivre than ' 
percent in Japan. Biiiaiii, 
France and ()erinan\ 
Shares wercotVnunc 
ihjii 5 percent in 
Mevico and down 
more than X per- 
cent in Hia/if 

Inlhernited 
Slates, the IXm 
Jones indusirial 
average tumbled 
224 pouns al one 
point, or bv 2 'I 
percent Bui U.ill 
Sifccl's besi-kiiown 
indicator recov ered 
some lost ground, still 
closing down IXb KN, or 2 3 per- 
cent, at 7.S47 7''. 

The shiH'k came lusi davs 



alie) the Itlth annivcrsarv <if the 
tM hJ, NN''. crash th;it 'sent the 
llos^ plunimeiing 5IIK points, or 
ne.irly 21 percent But even w iih 
Ihursday's liiss. the average slill 
IS up alinii%t 22 pcrceni this year 

t leniKI ( torman ti4. a retired 
editor punching the ticket at a 
lidclitv Investtnenis oll'ice m 
Sew \hA (in Thursdav after- 
niHiti, w.l^ hoping lot a larger 
sell -oil >o he could buy some ol 
his lavoriic stocks more cheaply 

"Lvcn I '1ST didn'l unnerve 
me." he Mid "In tact. I did some 
buy me ihcn 1 1 wouki have ii* be 
an exiivnie lirop ol scleral hun- 
dred points. acLiimp.inicd by 
siiv'ial disaster ll Mould have to 
he realK apocaly|itic " 

If there was a winner 
Ihursdav. it was the US liond 
market, which soared on the tiir- 

See STOCKS, Poge 14 




cur PAMUIIO i -^j < 
MATT RIMIlifR, LEFT; Dovid Roberts, and Ben Moor«, juniors in orchitoclure, work on their studio projects in Seoton Holl Thursday evening Their prefects are due on Sunday 



Crumbling attic still serves as classroom despite complaints 



lACOl iANtOMUS 

The studio in the attic of Fairchild Hall 
is noi what most students have in mind for 
an ideal elassrotim In fact, Fairchild 30K 
has produced complaints from many of its 
occupants 

Erica Bowden. sophomore in architec- 
tural engineenng, said she hates working in 
room 308 

"It's an attic. They stuck us up there in an 
attic And just like any attic, it is usually hot 
and dusty," Bowdeti said 

The room Bowden and other architcetur- 
at students work in has four small window 
atr conditioners 

Beth Ricklefs, sophomore in interior 
design, said the air conditioners have trou- 
He keeping the room cool when tempera- 
lures rise 

"It's really hard to conccmniic on your 



work when the atmosphere you work in is 
uncomfortable It can gel really hot up 
there. Nobody wants lo work up there when 
you have to dread the heat." Ricklefs said 

Because Fairchild 30N is an architectural 
studio, many eraser shavings, scraps of 
paper and dust particles find their way lo 
the floor Bowden said the room is rarely 
clean. 

"The flmr is usually dirty, and dust is all 
over Ihe shelves and tables," she said "I 
don't think janitors clean the room very 
often," 

Scntchcd ubics, punctured walls and 
grafTili also add to the room's unattraetive- 
ness. 

Fairchild 3011 is one of K-Staie's oldest 
rooms on campus, and the squeaky, wooden 
Hoor IS indicative of its age. 

"IVopIc have carved all sorts of things 
on the walls over time. One wall even has 



'Merry Christmas' sketched into tt," 
Ricklefs said. "The walls ate white plaster, 
so it's almost like an invitation to can-e 
something into it.' 



Dave [)eBusman, 
project cix)rdinator 
for Crumbling 
Classrooms, said 
work IS being done 
in the Fairchild 
building, but 
whether Fairchild 
30H would be 
upgraded was 
unknown 
Crumbling 
Classrooms is a 
Kansas Board of 
Regents program that earmarks money for 
classrooms in disrepair 

"The rooms repaired are on a priority 



i»i 

It's really kaid ts coo- 
cenlroie on fmr woti 
when 1^ otmospkere 
you work in it uncof^ 
brtoble It con git 
really hoi ufi ikeie 

• MiRkkWi 

wphomor* m rnimo' 

datign 

i>^ 



list, and a lot of repairs have to be held oil 
until the summer or until a break In order tc 
repair a classroom, \\i: ha^c to work arounij 
the rtwm's schedule," De Busman said 
"People can put in a'quests for upgrading 
dassriHims, but ihcie are still priorities" 

No immediate plans for upgrading 
Fairchild .^OK are being made, but tormei 
si mien Is who ha\e had classes there arc 
hoping those plans can lie changed 

Wayne Becker, junioi in inlerioi 
arehiteciure, said he would like lo be made 
siHm 

"I'm sure a lot of people dont like hav 
ing to go there late at night or in the heal ol 
Ihe day I don't imnd it l\\ delinilel) not 
the greatest place m the world, ami it coiihi 
certainly use some upgrading, but overall 
it's still usable," Becker said "I et's just say 
1 1 I wanted to give my parents a lour of out 
university, ilvey wouldn't be going there" 



h 



DEADLINES 

TO PIACE AN miM 

in ihe Doily Plonrver, 

itop by KMzie 1 1 6 

and Fill out o (ornv 

or »flKiil il to 

co/lognMiuWi/ 

by \ I o m. two doyi 

b«lo>ra il is to run 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



MANAGING ECXTOt 
JUtTOn 




F ft I D A Y 



OCrOBER 24, 1997 



NEWSrewind 

Nmvi Stwind CiiltiKti ftte top compvi. bcol, itoli, national and woiid ntwt from l()t potf dS Wn Bri«^ or* coNscMd from 
Witt and Miff rBporti. 



4 car rammings forget women 
in Pottawatomie County 

WESTMORELAND, Kan - Women driving olone 
betweert MonhoHor) and Topeko or\ U.S. 24 hove 
been the viciimt of lour car rommmgs smcs Sept 
27, Potto walomie County outhorilitj %aid 
Wsdneidoy 

One of the women luitoined fflirtor irtfuries 

The women hove hod difficulty de^ribing o 
suipecl vehicle, olthough one toid il was a white 
Ifuck, said Poltowolomie SheriK's Deieclive Shone 
Joger. 

'All of the victims hove been quile frightened, 
at you con tmogirve, which hos mode it difficult 
For them to liy lo identify the cor," Joger Mid 
'And in three of the coses, we've hod nighttime 
0( dork driving conditions ' 

TFie lolesl mctderd was Soiurdoy when o fosl- 
moving cor come up behind a westbound cot dri- 
ven by a Manhatton woman and rammed her car 
between St Marys ond Belvue 

The woman pulled over but wo) followed by 
the other cor onto the shoutdet ot obout 9:10 
p m The womort pulled back on the rood but was 
followed by the olher cor, wilh the driver flashing 
his lighis unlil Finolly pulling off neo( Womego, 
Joger said. 

Olher incidents occurred Oct 16 east oF St. 
Moryi, Oct 5 west of Wamego and Sept 27 
eosi of MonhoMorv 

The victim of the Oct S inciderti sutlotned 
minor tn|uttes when her cor wos rommed twice 
and forced off the rood 

Philip Morris Co. evoluates 
smokeless cigarette, lighter 

NEW YORK - Phihp Morns Co is testing o 
smokelesi tobacco system that uses o special cig 
orelte and pager sized lighter to reduce smoke, 
oih and odor 

The corrypony soid Thursdoy it plont lo give 
the Accord smokeless system lo al>out 1 00 adull 
smokers in ihe United Stales and Jopon 

"Many smokers hove told ut they would like to 
hove o cigorette which offeis tess ombieni smoke, 
less lingertng odor and less ashtray mess," said 
John R Nelson, senior vice president for busine» 



development 

Unlike regulor cigoreltes, the battery-powered 
Accord ollows loboceo lo bum only when il is 
puffed But smokers must lift ihe entire device lo their 
lips v^en ittey in hole, the com pony said. 

Smokers will still inhole the some amount of lor 
ond nicotine in convenlionol ullrolighl cigarettes 

Tlie cigoreltes will cost up lo $275 o pock 
The cigorette holder, a battery charger ond a 
pock oF Accords will be sold in sigrter boxes for 
$50 

Critics, tuch OS Itichord A. Doynord, chairman 
of the Tobocco Products tiobility Project ol the 
Northeastern University School of Low in Bosion. 
charge ihe product is on example of how for ihp 
tobacco industry will go to moke a dangerous 
hobit sociolly occeploMe. 

New York Times chairman, 
publisher to speak at Washburn 

TOPEKA, Kan - Arthur Ochs Sulibergef Jr , 
publisher and cfroirmon of the board oF the New 
York Timei, will lead o series of seminors Nov 1 ? 
at Woshbufn University as part of the school s 
Oscor S SiouFfer Execulive-in-Residence Lecture 
Pfogrom 

the progrom, which storied in 1996, btmgs 
business ond political leaders lo Woshbum 

Sulzberger [oined the Times in 1978. became 
publisher in 1992, and last week was nomed to 
succeed his father, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Sr , os 
chairman oF the New York Times Co 

Grandfather kills 4'year-old 
as he backs up utility truck 

WICHITA, Kon — A 4yeor-old boy was killed 
Wednesdoy when he rode his bike behind o pn 
vote utility Ituck jusi as his grondfolher began lo 
back il down ifie drivewoy 

Jesse Moyer was deod at the scene of the occi 
dent in Sedgwick County obout 2 30 p.m 

A family Friend hod tried to worn the grandfa 
ther, but he apporently did not hear, said Sheriff's 
Sgl Borbofo Byerly 

Jesse olwoys hod o smile on his face ond liked 
to pick strawberries from iF^e garden and ride his 
bike, said hisgreot-grondfother, loyd Pennmglon 



DAILYplanner 

> Phnnfi '1 Ihe Collegioni campui buitaTin board 



Jhrf 



lervicf Itfmi m ftw phnrm con b» publi^itd up lo thim 
rinwi heaii moy nor opptoi becouM of ipac« coni^oinli but 
<M gvoraniMd if? apfMoi an )h» thy ol ttw ocffwry to pkxt 
an itvm, slop by Kediif t td and hff out o hrm or unail it to 
(QllegnHui adu by Mem Aho doys bitbre it ii to run. 



•The Deparlmeni ol Entofnology will present speak- 
ei C Michael Smith ol 1 30 pm today in 
Waters 133 l-te will pieseni "Atoleculor Morker- 
direcled Selection for AphirJ Resistance in 
Wheal" 

•KSU Aikido will meet ol 7pm every Mondoy, 
Wedneidoy and Fridoy Ihii jemeslei in Ahaorn 
301 Beginners con itoi) ot ony lime 

iOithodoK Chiisiion Fellowship will hove a divine 
liluigy al 9 30 am Saturday in Union 207 
Chad hlolField of Alt Sainli Orlhodotr Ct^urch m 
Salino, Kan , will bie the c«labront 

•Women's lohboll will hove o meeling at 9 p m 
Sunday m Union 706 Anyone inleresled m play 
mg III the sp'ing semestef should attend 

•Moilot Board will award two $200 scholar ships 
to (uniors thii foil Applicolions, now avoiloble in 
the Office ol Student Aclivilies and Services on 
ihn giound floor ol the K Stole Student Union, are 
due l)y S p m Monday 

•Alls ond Sciences College Couricil opplicotioni 
Qie ovqiloble in ihs Office of Student Activities 
ond Srtivices and iho dean's office in Eisenhower 
Hall They ore due by 5 p m Gel 3 1 in either ( it 
these offices 

•Sludervi Cancer Reseorch Awards of 1500 ore 
ovoiloble tor undergraduate students m a health- 
leloted dagree Applicotions are avoitoble in 
Ackeit A 1 3 and ore due by Dec 8 



POUCEblotter 

Reporli ore toi«in dinKily iiom lh» KS)o>» and Biby County police 
depaffmenli doily 'ogj YM do noi till wfiee/ kxki W mmo» *oftc v«jJ» 
Mm becouM ot jpoce consiramH 



KSTATE 
THIMSDAY, Oa. 23 

•At 2 30 am, Scott Gordon Mc>ore woi arrested For 

DUI He reFused a preli minor y breath lest and tests at 
ihe K Stole Police Deportment He woj olso issued six 
citolions 

•Al 10:41 am, Riley County AmbubrKO responded 
to Edwards Holl For o subject who hod fallen down 
itotrs 



RILEYcouNTY 

WtDNtSOAY, oa. 23 

• At I I 36 p m , James A Miller, Leonordville, 
Kort , woi arrested for DUI Bortd was sel at $ 1 ,000 

THURSDAY, OCl. 23 

•Al I 25 am , Mtchool A Porks was arrested For 
obstruction of lego! process and possession of q sus- 
pended license Bond was set at $300 

•Al 2^3 am , Joshuo J. Wilson, 2215 College 
View, Apl 166, was arrested For DUI Bortd was sei 
ot $500 

•At 8 32 o m , sloff ol Elsenhower Middle School 
reported a teocher had been battered. A battery 
report wos filed 

•At 1 256 p m , Jontie I Wolff was arrested on o 
fiiley County woirant For Failure lo appear Bond wos 
sel Qi $300 

•At 3:27 p.m , Alice M. Hyrt wos orrested on o Riley 
County warrant For aggravated bottery Bond wos sel 
ol $5,000 



M& 



CprrecHons 
CURIFICATIONS 




Someiime^ ihe L.'Vlie^'fin mnkei a mislolie il a mistake occurs, conlocr Jiii 
Story, monoging ediicii. by phone (5376S36| by e^oil 
CoJhignMHi n/u O' by klopping by iht Coltegian at Kediw 1 1 6 



56' 

Low: 45' 
Tooiar 

Afternoon 
thunderstorms 

poivble 

Tonight, colder 

with occoiional 

rain. 

iXIWPIO 

Colder with 
roin likely on 

Saturday 

Possible snow 

onSundoy. 

oSSMh 

IT PHONE 

NfwatooM 
S32-6556 

AovtfTis**-. 
532-6560 
Ci*i;jtnDi. 
S32-6555 

tTE-NUUl 

COtiwrtfttiUiDU 

IT MAN. 

IUnsai StAt! 
COUfCUN 

I \6 Kim Hau 
KAt«uSut( 

LJnkeisity 

Manmaitan, KS 

66506 

IN Pf RSON 

iMf CoUtGlAN 

NfWS*OOMISIN 

KED»n6 

(*CK)Si fKDM 

tMt K^tATf 

SrUUNt Ut40N|. 



Tlw Hfmrnm tkf Calijliii lUSPS 29 1 0201. a ^^tudent ivMpafm a Koraoi Siaii> Univ»isity. is pubUwd by ':i 
Pwiodicdt postage <% pind ol Morhoilon, Kon. 66502 POSTMASfflf Send oddii«Sl ehoitget to Konios Stons Colegion ' i 



'-■'^>-- trx: i.t-Aiw 101 Monhgiton Kon 66506 The Collegian is published wetkdo^ during ihe xhool y«ai ond twict a waak ihiough the summer 
■■ !,.■*. 1(1") Manhaiwn Knr 66506-7167 © (OiNSW 5i*)f C okmn 199'' 




'^ «t« ^^^ 



5< 



FIHPAY, OCTOBtR 24, 1997 



KANSAS STATI COLUOIAN 




MAN WITH A PLAN 

Professor receives $3,000 award 
for research work in transportation economics 



M 



ichael Babcock, professor 
o( economics, has been 
adding la the achicvcmenis 
and uuardv lining the wulK 
ot his ufliee lor the past 2S years. 

"It was a big olTicc when I moved 
in," Babcock said 

Now the awards, along wUh the 
stacks of papers and books Babcock 
uses to work on hiii research, have 
nearly taken over his office 

[lahcock added another award to 
his bell ih(s fall when he receded the 
Edgar S Bag ley Research Award The 
S3,(KM) award is given annuall) to a 
faculty member in ihe Department of 
Economics who has had an outstand- 
ing year of research. Babcock said. 

"I had a good year in the sense that 
1 goi some ouisidc grams lo do some 
research that benefited mc. benefited 
the department and bencftled the stale 
of Kansas," Babcock said 

Babcock got involved in trans- 
portation economics m the I^JTOs 
when iht ugnculturat economics and 



the economics dcpariments were 
joined. He started helping researchers 
one summer escn though he knew 
nothing aboui transportation econom- 
ics. 

Af^cr the grants ran oul. he decided 
he needed to learn more about trans- 
portation economics, 

"Now, here we are 20 years later." 
Babcock said 

Twenty years and several awards 
later, Babcock is recognized national- 
ly and mternationalty as a leadmg 
researcher in the field of transporta- 
tion economics. 

He has received awards for his 
research in agricultural transportation, 
intcrmodal competition in the inier- 
cily freight markets and the effect of 
public policy on transportation market 
shares 

"He brings to the economics 
department an international and 
national reputation in the transporta- 
tion area." James Ragan. economics 
department head, said 



The new award on his belt of 
achievemeni isn't the first Edgar S. 
Bagley Research Award Babcok his 
received. He also earned the award in 
I'JN^and I'J''^ Babcock said. 

Babcock has a long list of achieve- 
ments as a result of his tenacious 
research abilities, Ragan said. 

"The Baglcy award is based on 
cumulative research, and year after 
year he is efTective in terms of bring- 
ing in grants and publishing his 
research," Ragan said 

Babcock has no plans to slop 
researching issues of transportation 
economics. He is working on a 
research project for the US. 
Department of Agriculture to prove 
there is a way lo predict in advance 
how many loads of wheat will be 
transported bv rail cars. 

There's only one stipulation 
Babcock said he has to follow. 

"My wife said thai I can't go down 
to the office on the weekends any- 
more." Babcock said with a laugh 



STORY BV JUIIE IINDAMOOD • PHOTOS BY ClIF PAIMBERG 



Rival schools battle online 



»^CoiUG{ Jeopardy PUTS 

Sunflower-Stote rivalry 
into digital age. 

U»Uf NACHIIiW 

Students from K-Stalc and the 
University of Kansas are getting the 
chance to lake their Sun flower- Slate 
rivalry into the digital age by going 
online. 

College JEOPARDY? Online, spon- 
sored by Columbia TriStar Interactive, is 
an online version of the TV game show 
but is designed for college students. 

More than 30,000 students, including 
K -State students, have entered into the 
12-weck tournament that began Sept I 
for the chance to battle it out with rival 
schools and win prizes. 

"We thought the col lege- rivalry 
aspect would be fun," said Joanne Hvala, 
director of communication at Sony 
Corporation of America. "A sort of test 
for brains rather than brawn." 

The site keeps an updated list of the 
top- 100 colleges in the tournament. In 
the eighth week of the loumament, K- 



Statc ranked "JNth on Wednesday, but 
dropped out of the top UK) by Thursday. 
KU was unranked. 

In the Big 1 2, Texas Tech ranked I .llh 
Thursday with Tcjtas A&M following al 
I9lh. 

Other colleges ranked on Thursday 
included Iowa Slate University. Wichita 
State University and Baylor University 

Even with the qualifying rounds of 
the loumament winding down. Hvala 
said there is slill a little time li> register 
and play 

"We're coming to the last phase of 
the contesi," Hvala said. "It's the col- 
lege-student audience's final change lo 
get pnzes, because you have lo pl..> a 
certain number of games to be entered 
for prizes." 

Players can register to play the gumc 
at the site, find (he rules of the game and 
see how individuals and their universi- 
ties are comparing wiih other contes- 
lants. The site also has a btKU camp 
where experts offer preparation and 
study tips to players. 

Tbc answcr-with-a-queslion lormui 
is kept the same as the original show, hut 
the categories are more college-oriented 
Categories include such topics as TV 



spinoffs, hairstyles, world capitals and 
US presidents. 

I he first ID weeks of the loumament 
are qualifving rounds. Players must pby 
ihrcc 10 live games a week lo have their 
store ranked for thai week Kach weeks 
li>p-IO players advance to Ihe semi- 
finals rhe next Itio highesi-sconny 
players as of Nov. I (i. ihe end of the 
qualifying rounds, also qualify for the 
scm I finals. 

In the last two weeks of Ihe louma- 
mcni. semi -finalists piirticipalc in an 
eliniinalion lournamem The final three 
individuals advance to llic final round 
The final lournamem will be at an undis- 
closed location 

Pn/cs .ire awarded to individuals, not 
colleges Weekly winners and runners- 
up receive ditfereni prizes including 
SI (HI gift certificates from the (lap. 
S4tH) worih iif Sprini Pt service per 
month for six months and Ponitac jack- 
ets The iKurnameni champion wins a 
choice of a 1 W(( Pomiac vehicle 

The World Wide Web site, called the 
Station, can be found at 
myusiaiionmnytom. A second tourna- 
ment is scheduled fur Jun 5 through 
March 30 



Dairy Day offers farmers education 
on increasing production, efficiency 

»> Annual EVENT Focusis 

on importance of cov^^ 
comfort in production. 



AMY Macn 

Kansas dairy farmers can learn more 
about increasing milk production and 
cow comfort dunng the 19th-annual 
Dairy Day on Thursday in Pottorf Hall al 
CiCo Park. 

Sponsored by the Department of 
Animal Science and Clenzadc Chemical 
Co., Dairy Day helps update dairy farm- 
ers on research developments at K- State. 

This year, Dairy Day will focus on 
cow comfort. 

"Keeping them dry, out of drafts and 
reduce heal stress in the summer are 
things thai keep cows content," John 
Shirley, associate professor of animal 



science, said. "It's true ihai the content 
cow will produce more milk " 

Different K-State animal icience 
professors will speak about cow com- 
fort. The mam speaker is Dr Gordon 
Jones, a vctennarian who will present 
"Cow Comfort in Freestalls " 

Shirley said K-State has sponsored 
Dairy Day since 1477. Aboui 250 to 3(Xi 
dairy farmers throughout the stale are 
expected to attend 

James Dunham, extension dairy spe- 
cialist, said Dairy Days have heen wcll- 
leceived by dairy farmers, 

"Thai's why we get good lurnouis 
every year," Dunham said. "Each com- 
modity group has a day. like Caiileman's 
Day. and this is ours " 

Besides research, dairv farmers can 
look at commercial exhibits r>airy 
equipment and pharmaceutical and teed 
companies are some of the exhibitors 



'It's our rule to educate dairy farmcrx 
and hope they will gam some ideas in 
meetings like this to help produce more 
elTlcicntly," Dunham said. 

Much of the setting up for Dairy Day 
IS done b> the Dairy Science Club. 

Matt Meyer, senior in animal science 
and president of the club, said several 
students go each year to see what 
research is being done ami to meet 
prospective employers. 

"This IS an opportunity for students 
to speak to difTcreni companies, a net- 
working opportunity with producers. It's 
beneficial to know people m the indus- 
try." Meyer said 

He said the day was a gmid opptirtii- 
nity for the animal science deparlment to 
showca.se us research 

"PriHluccrs can see the headway 
being made that's applicable to their 
opera I mn," \ I ever ^aid 




^M4 /5>^ l/eoA. ! 



KSU-Ed Chartrand 
Memorial 
Soccer Tournament 

October 24-26 
Anneberg Park 
Manhattan 



& 



Featuring college soccer teams from 
the Big 12 and ttiroughout the Midwest 

K-State • Wichita State • KU 
• OSU • Pittsburgh State 
• MU • Iowa State • OU 
• NU • Emporia State and more.... 

Soturday- 8 AM thru 7:00 PM 
layoffs Sunday @ 1 0:00 AM 
' Cfwrnpionship® 1:30 PM 






W 



Friday night /$ K-Sfafe vs. KU night 

.• 6:00 PM (KSU Women) 
J:15PM(KSUMen) 



Come see locol youth soccer teoms ploy. 

{Giris @ half-time ot 6:00 PM gome 

& boys @ 7:45 PM) 



Visit us at www.chartrand-soccer.org 



m 



■)l 



OMNON tWOtl 



KANSAS STATE COUEGIAN 



4 mmmm^^^ 




OUR Jew 

Our View, an editcxiol 
i«le(f«(J orvd debolMJ 
by iKe edibtial boord, 
I) written ofief 
mofOMty opinion it 
fotmad Th« odtrorial 
bootd conuilj ol 
Collegion editors and 
other tluH mwnbwi 
Out View II 1^ 
Collegian 'i offictol 
opinion 



Smokers, nonsmokers need to exercise 



PufTtlie Magic Dragon prubtiMy 
never tHilhcrcJ unyonc with 
hi!i smuki.*, because he lived hy 
the sea. Dtii here in landlocked Kan^s, 
smokers can! help but get ihc smoke in 
the eyes of some folks. 

On (he front step^ of many halli>, piles 
and piles of cigarette butts can be found, 
wmetimes righl next tu a cigarette reccp- 
laetc Thtiugh iherc might be all mna of 
underlying reasons for these misplaced 
cigarette buds, there is something all slu- 
dcni^ ciin do to help stop the spread ot 



these butts. 

[>on'i use the cigareite rcccpiaeles as a 
place lo discard your pop cansi, bananu 
peels or auto parts When thea* s room in 
(he cigarette rcccplaclcs, mure bulls will 
make il in. 

As wc wave goud-byc lu the luasiy 
ditys of summer and hello to the froslincss 
of fall, more and more smokers congre- 
gate closer to Ihc doors of buildings. 
Because there's nowhere else for all 
smokers to go. jus) he sure lo be consider- 
ate of people entering and exiting the 



building. IXin'l block the way or make 
people wade through a smoky ha/e 

If you feel the need lo smoke while 
wulking through campus, please lake care 
lo notice where you're Hinging the hand 
holding the lighted cigaa'lie You might 
catch liomcone's hair on fire, causing dis- 
comfort for all involved 

As a sagacious smoker once said "It 
doesn't lake much lo watch where you're 
blowing smoke" liven though that snutkc 
might be tasty to you, it could he the trig- 
ger of an asthma uUuck tor someone else. 



understanding 

Take care to not let your smoke billniw 
onto passers-by. 

And for all you nonsmokers, under- 
stand that most smokers are addicted. If il 
were easy to quit, there certainly wouldn't 
be nearly as many smokers roaming about 
as there arc now. A liiilc patience and 
understanding can certainly go a long 
way. 

Smokers and nonsmokers alike need to 
foster an urnlcrslanding and respectful 
relationship for each other As the saymg 
goes. "Kate ibc cigarette, not the smoker." 



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Bluegrass embraces 
the human spirit 




I inally My rile of passage had come 
to fiass I hud to go all the way to Kansas 
( It). Mti , li> do It, su-siuincd only by a Hit 
( >' I loncy bur and the p<>simodern ram- 
hlinii't III m\ dear friend Puul Bui m the 
cntt I kltc\^ It \va> ihc right thin); to do 
Niid a tast\ Ma> tu do il 

A packed church Iwo (tuitars IXk 
Watson 

I'lTlorniing in IronI of my own eyes 
was this 
bluegrass 
g fl d . 
^^^^^^^ tliocklin' 

pick in ' 
old-time 
tunes like 
he was sit- 
ting on his 

UANM HliriO .< <pl«>K»i ^ ^' 

.n ptin) lOurrsJum smi tnflhih/ at porch. Ol 

>■»<* wipiin^ rui (un wid ycKii • hound dog 

if*tj»l fanmaiHh te BfafM^ of lying off 10 

t-w>J7'««,«i, tiKside 

Itlucj^rass IV a genre of music that. 
iinlcv\ \iHi"rc exposed to it early in life, 
you luoc to lei it grt»w on you Like hair 
i ir teeth 

And ril admit, the twang of iIk banjo 
.Hid the ^cnenil mbred feeling the music 
jLMVi; UK* upim fll^t lulling my \irgin car 
\n,is not siiiiiethin^ I enjoyed II made ine 
Iwl viMD^'c. like I »as at someone '<> |:rand- 
pari'nts house altci church on a Surtday. I 
didn'l like going to anyone's grandparents' 
iitiiisc. especially un a Sunday 

Ihcn there were the unagcs of ol' 
I iidc Jim inakin' inoonshine from his 
still nil ihc b,ick porch 

And Ml my <>iruggle began 

Dm details arc (Ust dciaiK 1 et's jusi 
lavi tnrw.ud ki present liincs, granting 
y'all ihe pri\ilege of skipping over the 
ugly eia vkhen hlucgruss was indeed 
attaching ihcll to me, not unlike a larvae 
id' some kind As I rench is the language 
III love. Ihc b.m|i) and guitar arc the Ian- 
fuii^i: III llraiuli 

So ihcic I was, squished compactly 
intiilhe ve.it hiyh ahtne Doc and his play- 
ing cohort, lack I .iw re nee Sure, the seats 
were uncimittirlable lit was a church, 
a tier all ). the big guy neM to me kept hog- 
ging the ainitesi ,iiid stinie kid behind me 
larted ,ilon^* In the music 
loi the will lie first 
lialt Hul that 
diti'\n'i mean 
It was ci«m- 
piclely 



unenjuyable Anyway, every rite of pas- 
sage can't be painless. 

Alk-r bluegrass granddaddy Bill 
Monriie died a few years ago. I was sure 
there was no chance for mc to ever sec ihc 
real masters nf the music play 

I 'd forgtiiicn about Doc 

And so, in the crowded church, with 
the lights dimmed low, I'hK and Jack 
spent two hours trading lokes (mainly 
having to do with suppnsilones and hear- 
ing aids I and causing Ihc crowd lo burst 
into ear-splitting applause after each song 

As I sat there. 1 knew I mmld he 
unahic lo appreciate the magnitude of the 
situation before me But at the same lime, 
I knew that this wasn't the Walnut Valley 
festival or a Bill Monnte tape This was 
legendary, and I was there I would 'vc wet 
myself if Id known n wouldn't call atten- 
tion to my sopping britches 

Having anemJed many coneerb with 
Paul, I though! I knew what his response 
would be I figured he would sit there 
slodgily. without espresMon, until tlic con- 
cert was over Then alferward. when asked 
whal he thought of it. he would reply in the 
same stodgy manner. "Oh It was great" 

Bui there was something dilTereni 
with this concert. Though I know he'd 
always dug the other concerts he's been 
to, this time it was visible The smile on 
his face, the tapping of his fingers on his 
knee Doc had gotten lo him, too 

To the naked eye. all of ihts was just 
an ordinary concert on an ordinary 
Saturday night People fart and fight over 
ami rests every day the world over f here 
was no (Hilward reason this particular 
evening would warrant much after- 
thought Before I went. I would have pre- 
fc*rred to stay home and spend lime wilh 
loved ones. 

After a rousing revival of "Black 
Mountain Rag" and iwtt standing ova- 
tions, il fmally dawned on mc that blue- 
grass IK much more than a concert It's 
just ahoui bringing folks together aitd 
having a little fun 

Muinshinenol ineluded. 




KKIS IMMONf/Coll*e4an 




ItU KRAII/rolleg,af> 



A LACK OF TIME AND EFFORT CAN CHANGE YOU FROM A FRIEND TO 

THE FORGOTTEN 




It E UV 

FURNAS 

KUY PUtNAS II t wplKimoff 

■n ptfnl pmnf^in Tou ton wnd * 

okkI lo Kt>r ol M56Aimm mki 



Apparently, I was iK>\cr meant to have a friend for life 

I hardly talk lo anyone I went t<i high school with This 
wouldn't be such a sin if I went to high schwil in another state, 
but I went to high schmil ^11 miles away in Topekn 

Making the transition into college put a lot ol <itrain on my 
triendships Part of it nas because ot distance some of my 
Irtends went to the llniversity of Kansas, others went out of 
state I didn't even sec inucli oj niy friends who went to K- State 
because the campus was mi large for the first tmw m 12 years. 
I was in classriHims ni which I didn'i know anyone. 

But the strained Inendships eventually lumed into torn 
friendships Now it seems .ill of the friends I had in high school 
are nothing more than correspondents Some of them commuiih 
cate spiiringly via e-mail Others occasionally call Most, how- 
ever, seem liappy with the fact that I only occasionally think 
about them 

But I deserve mosi of the blanw A lot of the fault falls 
sc|uarely im my shoulders I am always too siubKirn. too la/y or 
tix» busy to pul the elfort into salvaging friendships 

Sometimes the opportunity to maintain a friendship presents 
Itself, and I don'l take advant,ige of it I will be on campus and 
walk by someone I know, but 1 will pretend I don't see them fart 
of iiK- IS embarrasH'd that I haven't called them in a long time 
Another part of me is siiymg I have to miive on from old rcla- 
tuinships As stxm as I walk by them, howevei, all of nie wi»hc*s 
I had said something 

Ihere is something terrible about nivt acknow ledging people 
whom I've shared a history with It's even worse when I've 
shared time with them 

My best friend throughout high school is now a student al K- 
.Statc In fact, one of the reasons I chose to go to K- State was 
because Id be with her But we don'l talk anymore She's made 
an effort , and 1 made an elTori (albeit ihiI a giHid one) Now all 
of our discussions consi%i ol "Dl tail you sometime" We 
both blame our crippled friendship on lack of time She. after all. 
IS ju.sl an busy as I am. 



The truth is. our fnendship has changed to the point where I 
can nu longer value it as much as I once did When friemis grow 
apart, it's because the> are no longer there every nH)ment they're 
needed. 

Instead of being with me when I was lonely, she was doing 
something that was important to her lile When she called me, 
chances were I was in the middle of simicthing I needed to do 
Schedules of college students take lew pnsoneis Ihe hcst 
friendship [ ever had wns a casually of that war 

The cITeets arc not always sti draiitaiic. however Some would 
find It humorous that I forget the names and faces of people 1 
hung out with less than two years ago One tune, on my way to 
campus, I ran into a tamiliar face v^ho stopped mc with a "Hey, 
Kelly" I was all set to just ninl and keep walking, but she stopped 
and seemed tike she wanted to talk I had to say si unci lung 

"Hey you " 

Out of kindness or ignorance, she didn'l try lo espose Ihe fact 
that I had no idea what her name was I was fairly sure she went 
to my high schiK)l. so I mentioned Htimecoming, talked some 
meaningless chit-chat and went along my way I* very lime I've 
seen her since then, we've just noildcd to each other 

There are the sacred lew who put up w ith niv ternbte behav- 
ior Well, actually, there's |ust one she gtvs to Kf Stie'll call 
me even though I never call back She'll write me although I've 
never picked up a pen She'll e-mail me, and I won't even take 
the lime to type a quick reply She is tireless in hei attempts to 
maintain a friendship c'ven when it must seem that I have no 
intercsi in it She's the perfect frtend 

Unfortunately, not many other people would be willing to 
saenfiee so much for s« little m return Iltal problem will 
undoubtedly present itself again over the itcM four years, as the 
friends I've mode in college leave and we cxchiingc empty 
promises to "slay in touch " 

They say people who don't learn from history are condemned 
to repeat it They call those people fwils. 



READERS write 

K- State fans ihow pride, 
ctass during A&M gome 

I diloi. 

I was one of the TcKas A&M fans in 
iillendance at last Saturday's A&M vs. 
K -State Imitball game. I would like to 
take this opporiunily to thank the fans of 
K -Slate fwjtball for their liospiiality dur- 
ing our visit 

t-veryone wc mcl wis friendly and 
iielplul flic K -Slate fans carry them- 
>elves w lib class and pride for their team 
and kchool wilhuul being negiiivc or 
derogjiloty to the visiting team I was 
very impresiied with the K-State stu- 
dents and fans This is college football 
the way il should be 



I'll look forward to seeing yw all in 
the Dig 1 2 chiimpinnship game next sea- 
son. Good luck the rest of the way this 
year. 

Mall (iadcn 

Tows A&M Univcreily, claiw of IW5 

Stadium ploni In need of 
more teoti for itudenti 

Editor, 

I am writing you with concern sboui 
the anieic in Wednesday 'si paper on the 
stadium expansion. After recently 
attending the K-State vs Nebraska game 
in Lincoln, Nth , 1 would love to wc the 
•ddition of Kits Id KSU Stadium. 



Fvery K -Stile fan who attended the 
Nebraska game or who has experienced 
the sound of 70,0011 screaming tans 
would agree that a larger crowd could 
only help our beloved Cats 

My concern comes from the fad that 
the students will be frunting the bill I 
am not displeased with this idea, t think 
It IS a good one f)ur campus fees are 
already spent on things that many stu- 
dents do nol Of cannot parlicipaic in, so 
why not let it least half of Ihem enjoy 
Ihc football gunct? 

The thing that upset « me and should 
uptel many of my fellow students is the 
location of our new waU. As the plan 
now ttand*. itudent teats would be in 



the ntirth end /one on either the upper or 
lower levels. 

Because *t are paying for the seals, 
why can 'I thc7 cspand the stihleni seating 
into seeiHins 22 and 2.1, which wtiuld 
make the student section bigger instead 
of breaking it into iwo different seg- 
ments'' 

If Alhletic Director Man IJriek really 
wants the students to pay for this new 
addition, then he sluiuldii'i cKpect us to 
sit in the comer of the end xonc with a 
tcM-lhan-adequaic view of the field 
(iivmg the students sections 22 and 23 
would allow for greater panic ipilion 
fmm the crowd and might show the 
alumni side how imporunt it nt to be 



loud and supportive on every down 
instead of jusi on cntical plays 

Dylan Spencer 

senitvr in secondary education 

Anderton widening plan 
needf eaiy revisions 

Id It or. 

The Collegian report Monday alerted 
me that the Ciovcrnmcntal Relations 
Committee intended lo endorse the 
Anderson Avenue project as it is flere's 
just what we need another clique of 
bureaucrats making the wrong dceiston 
for us This "govemmeni" does not rep- 
resent tne I can think for myself 



I do not endorse the Anderson- 
widcning project as it stands now with- 
out safe bicycle access, without pedes- 
trian righf-oi'-way and the destruction of 
all green space in the process 

When will governments, agencies 
and enmmitlecs get if Progress is a 
win- win model of change 

A win-win model on AnderrHm would 
be lo design a plan that ci^mplcTncnis 
nature, provitk's sail* bicycle access and 
assures pedestrian right-of-way 

These revisions arc easy enough to 
consider. Tlien K-State should endunc 
the Anderson Avenue changes 

Evelyn Wray 

Foundations and Adult l.eaminf 



I*'. 



FiriOAY, OCTQUIl M, 1 997 



KANSAS STAn eOttiOIAN 



Zoo offers safe, 
fun alternative 



*• SUNSn zoo CEIiRRATIS 

with costumes, candy 



I'hilUrcn ut all ages au: invited to 
SpcMtktacular at Sunset /milogica) Park 
ftvim 4 to N p,m Sjturda> and Sunday 
lo enjoy a safe trick-or-treatinit atmos- 
phere, said Angic Fcnstemtacher, mar- 
keting dirccmr of the /w) 

"With the college campus and Korl 
Riic) being so close, a loi of people 
don'i know iheir neighbors Iiki well." 
Fenslermacher said "This pro\idcs a 
sate place to go tnck -or- treating." 

Sunset Zoo has sponsored 
Spookiacutar for se^en years 
Fensiefmachcr said it used to have a 
%'ar> trail but has switched to a chil- 
dren's trail 

"We have fun wiiches and fun 
ghosts" she said "Then; is nothing 
u^ary about it at all " 

Spix>ktacular plans to entertain chil- 
dren throughout the two oenings with 
aclnities and appearances, including 
face painting, crafts, a costume contest 
and the D.A.R.E car There will also be 
30 candy stations, tach are stalled hy 
costumed characters such as Winnie the 
Pooh. Batman and flmo. 

Children who want to enter the cos- 
tume contest should register at the zoo's 



main entrance between 5 .Hi and 5:45 
p m^ The contest judging will begin at (> 
p.m. 

A nianial ans demonstmtion will be 
presented by the Korean Martial Arts 
Fitness Center between 4: JO and 5 .10 
p m each night. 

Admission is S.' per child .\dulls 
arc free with each paying child unless 
they are planning to get candy. 
Fcnstcrmachcr said. 

"Spooktacular is a fund-raising 
event for Sunset i!oo." she said 
"PrtH.ecds from all our events go into a 
«Ki impmvement fund to build such 
things as the new ape exhihii " 

Circle K, K-Slate Pre-Vetcrinarian 
Club, West Hal! and Alpha Tau Omega 
volunteered to help with Spooktacular 
this year Fenstcrmacher said volun- 
teers are a big reason the /oo can put on 
the event. 

Fifteen ATD members will volun- 
teer their time to gain social service 
hours for the semester, said Rich Cole. 
ATO stKial service ctwtdinator and 
junior Ml business. 

"We're jusi doing it to gel involved 
and volunteer off campus." Cole said. 

Michelle Renner. /oo volunteer and 
senior in biology and life science, said 
letters have been sent asking for volun- 
teers West Hall put up a sign-up sheet 
for residents and plans to help pass nut 
candy 



New shuttle saves time, 
pain of campus parking 



*■ Bus SERVES AVERAGE 

of 92 students daily. 

UNPONTIAWNV 

Parking Servtces put a new shuttle 

bus into action liicsd.iy 

llarw m AbNitl, director of Parking 
Services, said the S'tl.tlOd shuttle was 
needed lo repl.wc the aging \,in that 
was used be lore 

The new \hutile seals l> passen- 
gers, compared to It) in the old van It 
also has niore rixim and easier loading 

"The new van gives us more rixim 
for people with backpacks," Abbott 
said 

Sonyanata Hardy, senior in family 
life and commtiniiv services, said she 
agreed the new shuttle is more usi-r- 
fnendly 

"It's net as crammed ^ou don 'I 
have to climb ovet petiple to get otf," 
Hardv said 

Dale Roberts, a shuttle driver, said 
he cnjiiys driv mg the new vehicle 

He said Its not as noisy, whereas 
people sitting behind the driver in the 
old van could distract the dnver with 
talking 

I sc of the shiiMle bus is free to all 
students and faculty fhe route runs 
Iroin t dwards Hall lo the K-State 
Student Lnion. then lo the KSL 
Foundation and back to the Union 



before returning to Kdwards Hall to 
begin the route again 

( )ne round tnp takes about 25 min- 
utes. The shuttle service runs between 
7:45 am and 5 p m Monday through 
Friday 

.'Vbbtitt said noore people are begin- 
ning lo use the sbuiile. and it is serving 
an average of 92 people a day 

He said the service is a small 
glimpse of how a full-scale shuttle sv s- 
lem could serve .students and faculty in 
the future 

"It gives us a feel of how people 
like It." Abbott said 

Abbott also said Parking Services 
w ill know moR* about the feasibility of 
a campuswidc shuttle system after the 
TranSy stems Corp. conducts its 
Manhattan and K-Staic transportation 
study, which should begin in 
November 

Hardy said she likes the idea of a 
full-scale shuttle service 

"Dver the week it saves tne hours. 
rather than looking for a parking spui 
And I don't have tn worry about get- 
ting parting tickets." she said 

Abbott said many people alleviate 
parking wxies by parking at or neat 
I'dwards Hall and the KSl' Foundation 
and riding the shuttle, rather than liH)k- 
ing lor parking on campus. 

Hardy said she enjoys saving 
money on gas for her ear but would be 
willing lo pay for a shuttle-service 
expansion because of its convenience 



EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATORS 



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Meats judging team spending time preparing for contests 



KllUr iOrMTON 

Chilly coolers decorated with live- 
stock carcasses hanging from the ceiling 
greet the K-Siate Meats Judging Team at 
each practice 

"The constant analyzing and thinking 
aboui meat really gets to you after you 
spend a few hours in the cwlers." said 
Di.vie Ihcurer. junior in agricultural eco- 
nomics 

The meats team is just one of the 
many intercollegiate cqi^ui^lioii^ms 
within the t ollege of .AghtSiUure. 

"This IS a great way for us to repre- 



sent the College of Agriculture and K- 
State at the same time." said Travis 
Larson, junior in agricultural education. 
"We like to project a friendly agricultur- 
al perception to our opponents when we 
go to a contest I've always been very 
competitive, and through meats judging. 
1 am able to extend that competition to a 
collegiate level " 

Thcurcr said the team competes with 
universiiies trom across the country and 
spends a lot of time traveling. 

"Every Thursday, we drive to 
Fnipona to work out at IBP Inc . ' she 
said 



"Contest- wise, we've gone to 
Denver. Fort Worth, Houston and High 
Plains. Tcvas. .ind wc still have the 
Amencan Rivyal and the International 
contest in Dakota City. Neb. next 
month." 

Meats contests consist of different 
competition categories Judgers place 
beef, lamb and pork carcasses and retail 
cuts according to the trimness, muscling 
and quality of the cut 

'We also yield grade beef carcasses 
and determine if they are cut according 
to written specifications," Thcurer 
laid 



Yield grades are the measure of per- 
cent of muscle versus the amount of fat 
in a cut. Larson said 

Despite spending a majority of time 
traveling to and from contests. Larson 
and Theurer both said they have learned 
a lot about themselves through the com- 
petitions 

"I have been taught to be more 
responsible and to manage my time." 
Theurer said "This is a unique opportu- 
nity that has helped me develop the abil- 
ity to think on my feel, make sound 
judgments and have a great competitive 
spint" 



SliAke It U 

Earn the cash you need for 
school. ..and to tnalce 
the holidays cool. 

Oup euprent 
full-time 'emploi^eetH 
earn M.OO/hr. 

After training you letyour schedule to earn 
the maximum hourly wage. 

H'e puri^ntly have openlngn lor: 
Full-ttme 

Day or F^vening 

Tele services 
Representative 

'time 




Eve n i n g AV'ee k e n d 

Tcleserviccs 

Representative 

Casual dress and bcnents for full and part-time. 

" (30 hrs/wk for evening/weekend) 

Calli 776-6000 

Or Apply in Pcckmii 

StSCd^Ks m Marketing Senses 





t 



—,»=*. ,^*^ ' 



0? 



tuNonwtu 



KANSAS STATE COlLEGtAN 




WATCH JfM MOORE COACH AGAINST HIS FORMER SCHOOL AT 7 P.M. SATURDAY IN AHEARN FIELD HOUSE 

Ex-Wildcat coach makes return visit 



fUNDft MHIS 

Cniich Jim Mihw and Ihc U'ikkals 

liir iIk' p/iM ihrci" \cars, sayini! ihnn- 
i)ji[iii.'-i in iIk' s.iniL' M'tiK'ncc cqiuikil iW 
k- Style vidlfyKiill ii,-ani 

[tii> H'iistni. (hiisc nutiK's loiicthLT 
ilk-iin k-Slali' \s h'\iis 

Minw IS l-^■dilcil wilh it WiUk'jil 
iiiny round l.ikinti the (ills troni ^(> lho- 
sLtiiluc cimrofciHi' losses to the N( A A 
rtiurn.itnent kisi siMstm I k did llic sunic 
thiii^ .11 his previous iitstitulion. 
Vorthern Miehiyun 

His ctVorts diJn't )io iiiiniituetl. This 
sprmi;, Moore lell lor Austin toumlinue 
the winning trinlllion ol' Ihi' Texuit 
I on^horn \olleyhiill leHin. 

It! Austin. VttH>rc a'ptacetl I nnphitm 
I'oaeii Vlu'k lliilcv. the vvinningesi coaeh in 
re\;is' iillilelie depaftineiii liistor>, who 
»eni on to ciUili the l' S OKiupte team 

MiHire said he's had nian> elmllengCH 
adjusting' to hie as a I on^horn 



"ll always takes lime lo feel tonitoii- 
ablc," MiH)re said "When 1 moved IVom 
Martguclk'. Michigan, to Manhattan, il 
tfNok time lo I'eel eomlorlahle 
Retniionships uke time" 

I or insianet, MiKire said lonipanny 
his re bit on ship lo senior ( ais seller 
Ikson Ryninji and longhoru seilei 
I'avlinu SielTkova is like eo in paring! 
apples to (iningvs 

"I've known Devon lor \cars, so its 
impt)ssible to compare or cvpcet that." 
Mmirc said "I tr\ to take e\i;r>one at 
taev value Tlie adminislralion al I 'I has 
hccn outsundini:. and I he people have 
treated tnekindiv" 

Iktwccn her parents, her brother, 
new iwruits and No 12 Texas A&M 
I'oming lo lown I riday, Rvning said she's 
heen \iw busy to think ahoul it 

"I juM really haven't ilioiij:lit alniitl il. 
because we're coinpletelv lotused on 
A&M," Ryninj; wid "Oil the toun, we 
were friends, and I'm evened lo see 



litem, but I haven't had time lo think 
about It " 

Vhmre said he has llioiijiht aKiiii it. and 
the I ortirlmrn's Satiinlav mght match with 
titet ais in Manliattaii will ptohahK he the 
most dillicuh Ihiitg he's done so tar 

"When ! leli Soithern Mii-hi(:aii. the 
player f vvas the closesi to was a senior 
named Jenn\ 1 otig." Moore siiid "She 
was ilie only senior at Northern 
Mielnjian II I had In plav Northern 
Shchigaii, 1 would have been extremelv 
dilVicull Now. I have to lace that " 

Alter meeiiii[; the Aggies on I riday 
night, the Cats will I'aee Mmire and the 
No 1 1 lon^hoinson Saturday 

"levas \&\\ doesn't imkc ii lot oi 
errors, and thev hit the hati hatd" Rynini.' 
said ■Fk-yrereaUonsisteiit ttcjitsikive 
to he .thic til sitle-otii this weekend ' 

Hie 1 onghorns picked up thiec-gaine 
wins liver No '» Nebraska and No |vi 
( olonido last weekend Both are teams 
the ( ats losl to al the etid ol SepleinKi 



I Itwvcver. MiHire said he's done nolh- 
ing dtHerent in the line ot Cvuching wilh 
his new icam 

"liasically. I'm doing the same thing 
since I started eo.iehing vollevball in 
l'W»,"M.Hiiesaid 

■((tleiisively, I'm Kisically doing ihe 
SU1IK things I did al K-Slale Hut I hope I'm 
,1 htlle K'lter than I was m 'W " 

Moore uses a last-paeed olTense, 
which IS simi- 
lai to the l')X4 
I S 
Men's 
< Il\ nipic 

t eatn 1 1 e e a 1 1 s h mtsi.' 1 r e \ treme - 
ly eomivelilive and said tins is one ., 
lime he imghl not iiecessanH thmk com- 
petition Is the jiteatest thing 

"I think I know them well enough lu 
know they II all do everyilnng in their 
powei to bi'ai me, " Mmtre s.iid "Hut they 
know me well enoiigli to know that I have 
one voal and thai cmd is to wm " 



Jcfl Kelly ImvJ a diffiaili liecishtn. 
//(' was sol an hvcotnin^ a li'iltlcai 
Ihti Willi OUaltoimi Iwiti^ his homv. 
Ki'llv lunl /n wvifilt his opUons. 

% r 



On his [lee l.'birilulay last 
year, mm or transfer line- 
backer Jell Keltv decided 
ili.it he wanted to be a 
Wildcat Uy ( hristmas. 
he'd changed his mind 
■'itklahotna is chKci," Kelly said 
"I'm kind or a home-type guy II H'enicd 
like a more neutral spot hir me " 

Dm two weeks be lore the signing 
dale, Kelly was hack lo being a Car 

"Mv dad and I talked about it. ' Kelly 
said 'We decided thai K-Sute v^ould be 
the K'st place lor me to be They have a 



UN D E 
program, 



[ 

and 



M I I 

they>c 



I 3 
goinj: 



winntn|! 
places.'* 

file K-Siale football ptogram is glad 
Kelly made that decision Since his 
arrival at K-Stalc. Kelly has been elimb 
mg the dclensive statistic charis 

doing into theOklahtima game, keltv 
IS the 1 ats' leading tack let wilh M\ tack- 
les 10 unassisted I'm the season Me 
also leads the team in sacks with live hit 
a loss total of 4'» yards 

His clJorts were recogni/ed by the 
Big 12 on Monday, when Kelly was 
named Hig 1 2 IXIeti.sive I'layci of the 



P M O J O ft y J t t 

Week Kelly recorded II tackles and two 

sack!) against ihen-undeleated llig 12 
Soulh opponent levas A&M 

Hcfore Ihc game. Kellv said inakuig 
tackles vvoutd be the key Allhoneli Kelly 
didn't necessarily ihink his peilniiiiaiiLe 
was the tvsl It could have kvti against 
the \ggies, he was pleased wiili the over 
all delensive ellod 

"I made a Ciiiiple of mistakes, and I 
probably could 've played Ivttet." Kelly 
said "llul It s hard to play bcnet than we 
p Lived s,m inlay " 

riie Cat deletise hi;ld ihe Aggies lo 



I C O O P [ R 

minus 15 rushing yards 

Oklahoma co.iches have accuMd K- 
Slate of underhanded recruiting taelteit lu 
accfuiic Kellv. as well as fellow 
Oklahoma freshmen Julius McMillan 
.ind Aaron 1 ockett 

"I tealK didn't Icel llw ammosily 
Ivtween the two schtHtls." Kelly said 
'IheCte trying to put on tfteir besi, and 
they h.ul nice things to say about each 
other" 

hxiis A&M was uIm) inleK'sied m 

W KEUY, Pogo I 



Council selects 
Olympic festival 
as new activity 
for fall semester 

JACM JANSONHIt 

'nil r|-[ti n.;, 

The International C on rdi ruling 
I oiineil has decided il is time for 
change Instead ol having 
Inlernational Night, this semester the 
emincil has ehosen lo have an 
Olympic festival 

Rita Vousseli. president ol Ihe 
Inlernational < luh, S4iid il has hud 
International Night every semesler 

"This IS somelhing new," she said 
"It's %i) American students can gel 
together with inleniationul siudents 
and have fun llopeiUlly. it wit) turn 
out big" 

The ICC niympies begin wilh an 
<ipeniiig cetenuiny al h tonight at 

5m OlYMnC, Pogs I 



WHAT'S HAPPENING THIS WEEKEND? 



SATURDAY, OCT. 26 

K-STAn SMUTS 

• foofboll at OkloKemg, I p.m 

on the Wildcoi Hatmoii, KKSU-AM 
580 

• Pr**9anw d»w livt from 
Oldohoma, 10 'JO a m on KSDB FM 
91 9 

• VBUvyboH tu Tcjtsi at Ahwrn, 7 
p m ofi DB92 

• Twmitt Hoo»i«r CIquki in 
Wooniinglon, Ind 



• WtorM twiM, gamt 6 ot 6 30 

pm on NBC 

MSKfnAU 

• lulk at C«iHcs, 7 p in on TNT 

• J«zs at Laktn, 9: 30 p.nt on TNT 

COUMI POOnAU 

^ MMMlpsf) w MicniOQn atof^^ 

II 30om ontSftJ 

• ?Mnu TIA, 1 1 30 m on CIS 



• T*ami T8A, I JO p m on CHS 

• Bo»fon Coll«ga of Notr* Dame, 

1 30 p- •■ UW 

• TMini TRA, . ..0 (j m .:.n AfiC 

t Honda Stat* ot Vlreinte, 6pm 

on ESPN 

nNMS 

• Iwratard 0pm, 2:30 p.m on 
ESPN 

GOLf 

• Lo* Vw^i InvilotiofMl, 4 p nt. 

ofl ESPN 

AUTO RACINO 

t NASCM ACMco 300, 1 p m. on 

INN 

SUNDAY, OCT. 37 

KSTATf SI>ORTS 

• Rowing, ti»ad ol Iht Iowa at Iowa 
CMy, tewo 

• Ttfidl, Hooiitf CbiiKv m 
Bbommgion, Ind. 



NFL 

• Konfoi CilY of St. Louit, noon 
on NSC 

• Ooktond at S«alH«, 3 pm on 
N6C 

• Toomi TIA, 3 p tn on FOX 

• Arionto at CaroUno, 7 p.m. on 
TNT 

TtNNiS 

• Eur«Kard Opon Fitiol, noon on 
ESPN 

OOtf 

• Lai Vli«ai InvHoiwMl, 4 p m 

ofiE'jPN 

AUTO RACINO 

• NASCAR ACMte 400, 11 30 

a m on TNN 

SOCCIR 

• MIS Soctor Chompioniliip, hwn 

Wgshingion, DC , 2 30pm^ «t 
AfiC 






FORMER KSTAH 

volleyball HeoiJ 
Cooch, Jim Moote, 
will r»tum to campus 
on Sofurdoy when 
his new teom, Tenoi, 
will ploy K State ot 
Aheorn Field House 
Texot IS ranked 
No II 
MUNOONWHin 




Soccer tourney 
dedicated to 
former Wildcat 




Soceer 
Tounfiamatt 

Th* l<MannuolKS«<ll»/Ed 
Choffrond Mwnoriol lacttt 
lovrnonwni wrl< bm ploy*ii 
Iroiti hniof ilvu Sunday. The 
Qomti wiH tMgin at t 30 
p m on F,»doy 01 )ft# KnrvL 
AnrwbvD folk Tit* 
icAciwing It Itti o( 
porlKi poling laamt in 4w 
lOMrnamtnl 

K-SMe 

tCwiMU 

toiio Siale 
Mluouri 
Wichilo Sial* 
dlbhoma 
Odlokima Sliil« 
Ntbrotlia 
Empono Skil* 
FwibwiSiMe 

SoiKa Ov^mi tuwft u iw^' l 

MKI IMMUUMf/i .il>g»> 



joa. WHin 

1U|1 VtfllCT 

I his weekends ]*M\ Annual K-State 
I d ( hart t and Memorial SiK'eer iourna- 
nieni at Anneberg Park uill noi be an ordi- 
nary men's s^ieeer li»urnameni 

It will he a tribute to a lormer K-Siate 
siieeer player ,ind a jsrass-nxTis elToti to 
pnimoie Hiiecf in the Uijj 12 Also, it * ill 
tia\e national lournamcnl ifualtl'ving 
tntplicaiions 

The tournament is Jediealed to 
^dward I CharirjiuL a K-Vtate gradu- 
ate and lour year member of the K-Slale 
s<K\er team Ikilied in May l*/74 al the 
age of ^i 

I'dwaid Charirand's brother. Art 
(hart rand, al^o a k -State gtiMluatc and 
fiiut->eaf iwinber of the k-Siale S4K'ecr 
te.tm. said he has several reasons lo help 
make the toumameni possible eaeh >ear 

"The primary reason for the luuma- 
ment is to have an an-gi>ing. living tnb- 
ute III l:d Churtrand" he said "The 
other reason lor the tournament is to 
keep stveer alive in the Big \2 until the 
Big 1 2 uikeii over " 

S(H'eef in the Hig 12 is mm at the 
club level, but (.hart rand said his ^ioal is 
to make ii a var^tly ^irt 

C'hartraiMl was integral in launching 
a Memorial Stxecr Toumameni Internet 
site He said he hopes the Web site can 
help turn stK'Ler into a (}i|< 12 varsniy 
sp«irl 

■'It has become a hub for the Big 1 2 
team.s." he said "It's a v«ay for Ihe Hig 
1 2 teams to contact eaeh other easily" 

Sinee W*i. the I'hartrand family and 
private donors have raised more than 
SKKMMW for K-Stalc sweer Art 
I'hanrand said most of the nionc> has 
gone to the tournament expenses, hut 
some of the intmey \s used hir si-hotar- 
ships. 

Sw SOCCER, Page I 



Today ^s athletes overplay 
tragedies; meaning lost 
in armbands^ patches 

Being a baseball Ian. I am natu- 
rally watching Ihc World Series 
In laet. nghl now I am havitig a 
very dilTicuh time wniing my column 
because' the game is tied. 

In watching the Tlonda Marlins play 
m the National League Championship 
Series and World Series, I hive noliecd 
moiil of ihcir players, eapcc tally the 
piU'hcB, have Alex Fcmaiulez's No }2 
written prominently on their hats 
Kemundc/ injured his shoulikr early m 
the pltyofTs and is out for the rmuiinder 
of ihisi xisan and probably all of the 
next 

While 1 appreeiate the showing of 
team spirit ami umly and that they have 
rallied behind Fernimdc/-, this \i • bit 
iwcrtHianl 

Sport! have slwayx dime a Ktiod job 
of xhtiwinit proper rwpcct to tragedies, 
v^heiher it h by wearing a blaek arm- 
band a patch, the number of vomcom- 
who din) or hit initialu 

An dinappointing aa F«nMndct% 
injury might be, \t\ far from i tngedy. 
That wofd i» used ti>n ollcn in »porU, 
attd the true meaning of the wvrd m foe- 
gotten or deereaiicd 

Sm nULOK, Page U 




DAN 

MERKER 



Otjnor dMwIftflAwidu 



FKIDAY, OCTOem 24, IW7 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Grant paves way for renovations 



NUWTKUn 

-iifl uriki 

Dvwiiiown Manhiiiun will g.et u 
r^celifi councsy ula litllc-knciwn gram 
priigranr 

The Miinhiilliin Main Sirai pru- 
grani offers jimnls lo small busitii'ssts 
tor slructural iniprmciiiL-iils k-atliDg to 
»;t«nomic IhhisIi lor ihc Lniiiiminiiy. Il 
is sptinsoa-d ihruugli the Nalmnul Trust 
for llisUiriL I'lt'NCfvaiiiiiv 

Scoll Morrill, dirccliir of 
Matihmtan Main Strccl. said tKc pro- 
gram works in ihe priimotion, design, 
devclopmcm und itrgatii/aiion of 
smull husuK'Mcs; it is also communi- 
ty-based. 

"The 1110 in purpose is to provide 
incentives to create jobs in down- 
towns," Morrill suid "Its kind of 
unique in that it ullivws the community 
to cMaUiKh the requirements lor fund- 
ing" 

Last year, funding from Manhattan 
Main Street helped renovate the second 
flwir of the I 'Inch huildinji ai 103 S 
lourttt St The project totaled S^.tKJCt, 



SS.tKK) of which came from Manhattan 
Muin Street. 

Thiti year, the program will fund two 
projects Funding will help the 
Chamber ot Commerce renovate its 
new building and remove a metal 
facade from a building at 41 1 ^ Poynt/ 
Ave. The building's second .story will 
be rcopenetl a.s office space aHer the 
facitde is removed 

The Chamber ol t ommcrce project 
[% part ot )i S220.(KM) renovation of the 
old KPl building at 51)1 Kiynt/ Ave. 
The project's funds will pay for a 
Poynt/ Ave entrance and reminiel the 
rcstrooms to meet Americans with 
Dtsiihililies Act requirements. Work is 
already underway on the building. 

The new building will offer an 
ciipandcd visitor's information center 
and a small-business development cen- 
ter. 

"This faeility will realty be a com- 
munity service," Dan Colantonc. pres- 
ident of the chamber, said "What's mi 
cutting ahiut the ttie expansion is (hut 
It will add member serv ices." 



The new building will have b,3(KI 
square feet. It will also include a multi- 
purpose room and two conference 
rooms that the current facilities in the 
Colony .Square building do not have. 

The second project will als*> 
increase business opp»>riunities down- 
town. 

The building houses (ieometncs 
and On the Avenue. A metal facade 
covers the north side of the second floor 
of both buildings. The facade will be 
removed and the micrior renovated. 

Julie Strecker, owner of 
(ieo me tries, said the project would 
bring buck the original appearance of 
the building. 

"The false facades are just a mistake 
that we need to correct," she said 
"We'd like to see the downtown build- 
ing facades restored to their original 
state. From our standpoint, you cannot 



attract new businesses to u dumpv 
downtown" 

Strecker said the building's original 
windows and exterior behind the lacadc 
are still in ginid condition Much ot'the 
renovation work will be to remove 
changes made to suppi>rt old signs that 
liung outside the building 

hinding through Manhattan Mam 
Street is available to any business 
downttmn. Ihe onlv requirements set 
by the state are that private matching 
funds hi' available for tlic project and 
that the pmiecl create jobs or business 
opp«irtunnies 

.-Ml applications are reviewed by a 
local hoard Ihe top proiects are passed 
tu the state level tor funding. 

■The program is avail.ibte to any- 
btidy downtown," Strecker said "j he\ 
think that there's a lot of red tape, but 
there's nothing." 



Don't v^ant to leave the office 
to pick up the Collegian? 



Get it on the Web. 



collegian, ksu.edii 




^ Classic Kitchen Line ^ 

Meal Peal %^^ 

Includes: I entree, 2 sides, I dinner roll 
and a 16 oz. soda fountain drink. 

Chers CKolce ^ 

Includes: I entree. I side and 
I dinner roll 

Blue nat^ ^2-^ 
Includes: I entree and 1 side 

I Entree ^zSO 



Alt pricea include »alpa lax 

located in the Union Stateroom 

10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. 






We'll Show 

You THE 

Money. 

• Excellent sUirting s>ilary 

• Six figure intonie |Kitfiitial 

• Structured cart'or palh 

• Entry level managetnctil 
opportunities 

• 50 years of conlinucd grtiwlh 

• Comprehensive training progr.iin 

(no expcrietiLi' nt'iess.iry) 

Now interviuwtng on Campus. 
Tuesday, October 2H, IW7 

To bcheJulc an mlerview 
contact yt>u r I*lAcem«H LMticv 

i>r c.ill 

Luby's Mtiniifjemert lr.imin^; S.limil .it: 

21(l/21'i772t) 




CAFira HI* 



AN ItaCAL OiTOKTUMIY IMIIOVIR 




With I if?pn>ng ^^ ^\^^ u^ ^< ZI^ ^ 



THE NEW 

MEDIUM! 

Willi 1 (.oppiric) 

THE NEW 

SMALL! 






^ 






^mi^^ 




YES, 
BIOGER 

IS BETTERI 



CALL 

CARRY-OLIT / DELIVERY 

WESTLOOP CENTER 



YOU ARE ALREADY IN 

AGGIEVILLE, 
WHY NOT VISIT OUR 

PUB? 

(StudeKt Pub that Is!) 

The 1998 Royal Purple yearbook 
will be taking portrait pictures 

one last night for BREB 

GET A FREE SANDWICH AND FRIES FOR 

YOUR EFFORT! 



FRIDAY, OCT. 24 

FROM 4 TO 9 P.M. 

^ AT RUSTY'S LAST CHANCE ^ 

This will be the LAST CHANCE to get the 

199S Royal Purple yearbook for *24,95! 

Join us for the Last Chance at LAST ChiANCE! 

ANYONE CAN m TtKR PICTURE 
TAKEN AT THIS TIMEI 



^^ 



^rno V A t 




98, 

rniirnTfi 



mi Show Your PURPLE PRIDE as thc^ 






/7 Cats take on #1 2 Texas A&M ox\ 

24 at 7 p.m. 

Then come out 

at., Oct.25 

as the Cats 
ttle #9 Texas 

at 7 p.m. 





-»- *^hb5 »*.» 



KANSAS STATE COLLI 6IAN 



FKIOAY, OCTOIEK 2A, 1997 



tun (>•• teen 



Omt 



H K'Stal* vi. Ok b ho mo 


K-Sfal* K-Stota 


K*5lQt9 l%*9POt# R'vlttftt 


K'Statft ^^^H 








H Alabama vs OI« Miis 


Alobamo Alabama 


Alabomo Alabama Alobamo 


Alobomo ^^H 


■ ( "(■ f wii'WBw n!fiT«n5(^B 




Texoj A&M Texai A&M Te;<Qi A&M 






H Florido Slat« vi. Virginio 


Florida Slate Flotido State 


Florida Slate Florida Slate Florida Slate 


FloridoSlate^^H 


H Bavlor v& Iowa Stole 


Baylor Iowa State 


Boy lor Boy! or Baylor 


Iowa Stole ^^B 


■ Oklohoma Slote vi Mi»ouri 


OUohoma Stole OUahomo State Okbhoma Stole Oklahoma Stole Okk^ioma Stole 


oSnoSu^l 






MUKI 


tNGtlHMm/Co%.on 



Kelly 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

Kelly, hui he s;iiJ Ihc tichool ilidn'i olTcr him » 
scholarsihip. 

After bonding with linebacker coach Brent 
Venables. Kelly said he became even more sure 
about his decision. 

"This team is winning." Kelly siaid. "If you 
want to establish yourself, >i)u go lo a tciim that 
will let you play" 

An early-season baRle for a starting position 
with fellow tinL'hjckiT Turellc Williams ended 



when Williams was injured m the {)hii> game 
hy a chop block Kelly has started in e\ery 
game except the Missouri match -up, and he 
hasn't looked back 

The game Saturday pits the Cats against anoth- 
er iiptiun attack, something Coach Bill Snyder 
said vaguely resembles previous opponents 

"They have the ability to run the same type 
of option like Nebraska and Missouri." Snyder 
said. "They also have the same l-back running 
game." 

The fad that the Cats gave three founh- 
quartcr touchdowns to the Sooners at KSU 
Stadium last scavnn leads the defense to adopt 



a simple attitude 

"This year, we're going to play lour quarters 
of fotrtball," defensive end Joe Hob t lements 
said "Last year, we didn't plav four quarters ol 
football" 

But Kelly doesn't want to Iwik at the past. 
Ilspecially when it comes to choosing football 
pixigrams. 

"1 chose K-St3te for one reason reality." 
Kelly said. "They're not livinj^ m the past, but 
looking at the future." 

Did he mtakc the nghi choice? 

"Look what's happening," Kelly said "Nti 
doubt" 



Team to compete in Iowa regatta 



MKHAH trr*N 

The K-State women's erew will travel to 
Iowa ( ity. Iowa, this weekend to compete in 
the I lead of the loua regatta 

< )nc week after sending only one varsity 
boat ii) Boston, the team w ill send more var- 
sity and nm ice teams to Iowa. 

Akiut Wl wontcn will be making the trip. 
and eight boats, five varsity and three novice, 
will compete 

I ast week, K-Staie s lone entry in Ihc 
Head of the Charles picked up confidence by 
piTliirming v.e\\ in a race that featured some 
of I he best crews in the world 

"We strive to be the best team we can be, 
no matter who we're competing against." 
junior rower Tricia Trover said "We worked 
really well as a team in Boston, and we want 



to take that to loiwi." 

Dcsipitc finishing 31st out of 50 teams in 
the Championship Lights, the team knows it's 
moving forward. 

"There were so many great teams there," 
junior Dareie Kclley said "It did us a lot of 
good lo know we can compete with them. We're 
just looking to keep improving ourselves We 
want to improve every time wi: go out." 

Both women said they were also excited 
about the novice team making its first trip 

"It's going to be a great experience for 
ihem." Kelley said 

Troyer said the team would do well. 

"The novice arc improving a lot. They're 
getting the big things down, and I think 
they'll be strong in Iowa," she said 

The team will be back in action Nm 1 in 
Manhattan at the Class Day rej;atta 



Tribute 



Olympic 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

the Chester L Peters Recreation (omplcv 
The competition bejiins a Iter the ceremonv 

The Assixialion team will he squanng otf 
against the International team The object is 
lo win as many games un p*)ssiblc in the 
three-day competition Points will be award- 
ed for each victory, and the team with the 
most points will he recogm/cd with an 
engraved trophv at Sunday 's award ceremony 

The Association team is compoH-d of five 
to eight groups of students who already 
belong to a club 

Jaw Lin Ong, ICC public relalmns com- 
mittee chairman, will help conduct the 
Olympics and will also participate on the 
International leam. 

"I will be there helping out, and I'll be 
there throughout the weekend when they 
need help," Ong said. "It should he a lot of 
fun." 

The International team will he made up 



of students who don't belong to any associa- 
tion. 

"You can play with anyone from uiy 
country. That gives everyone a chance to par- 
ticipate on a team," Ong said 

Ash rat .\fOudah. iiradualc studeni in 
economics, is signed up tor the International 
leam and is excited to siart the Olympics. 

"It's ^<H)d to h.i\e sumcthing like this. It's 
a good opponunity lo meet more people, and 
you can interact a little bit more." Al-Qudah 
said "I plan on playmg haskcthall with my 
friends I'm not thai gmid, but I'll try my 
besi I hope a lot of people participate" 

The Olympics do nttt only consist of ath- 
letic evenis such as basketball, volleyball or 
tennis There are water balloon tosses, 
I'iciionury games, chess, checkers and even 
sack races. 

Viussefi i-s not sure how many petiple are 
signed up tor the K (. Olympic games, but 
she thinks ihings will go well 

"If we gel a poMtivc resptmse from every- 
one, Mc'll continue io do it It's sonwihing 
ditkrent. so it should be fun," \ous<>efi said. 






Ol .YiVlPlCO 



The intornolionolCoofdinoling Council will be hosi lo a 3 ihrw 
day Olynipic coUpMUjgp bttwwin [niergti«i Airtgncon and 
interfvohonal iludenit B^ta □ ichedute of eveors 



Ope nijotfUinony 

toiklKatl 

Bbdtninion 



R»c ianur 



Ott, 33 

Rk cer)i«i 




m. Min^gbmei 

MfetnOlicnQl SKideni Ce(4M| 



ill 

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■feUjotl 

Oct. 36 9 g «> jaS Ciick¥ 

Memofiol 12 i^^4r'<^ lunch 
Stadium l2 3CMWp<it- fvngamei 

ti and eloiing ceremony 

Soiitc« InUfnwwol Cowdinohng Count.) AI«>l»WMAt)CINUkK/r.3l«q<ar. 




CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

When longtime announcer Mel Allen 
(lied last year, the New York Yankees wore a 
btack armband on their uniforms for the 
remainder of the season This was a proper 
sign of respect and mourning 

tt hen Kansas City Royals' owner Lwing 
Kaulfinan died, ihc team not only had a trib- 
ute to hini on then uniforms, but renamed 
Royals Stadium to Kauffman Stadium out of 
respect and gratitude to him 

The Chicago Bears permanently have 
"t'apa Hear" (iei»rge Hulas' initials on the 
sleeves ol their uniforms 

These are proper signs of Tespt\-i for 
tragedies .\ had shoulder is lar from a 
tragedy, and the Marlins arc showing disre- 
spect to all betore and in the future who have 
a tribute to sonielxidy on their uniforms 

Hohby Htinilta has a had hamstring Why 
not add the So 24 to the black hais' (iary 
Shelf icid has ,1 lender wrist tin goes No HI I 
think Kurt Abbott has a hangnail llou 'hciut 
No V ( )ne ol the hut boys |ust gol braces That 



hurts h there still room for No, 'J7? 

There are so many sad things going on in 
sports rghl now John Cullcn of the Tampa 
Bay Lightning is battling fur his life with 
cancer This is cause for them to wear a patch 
with the No I"* on it Vladimir Konstaminov 
of the Detroit Red Wings was nearly killed in 
an automobile wreck this summer and proh- 
abtv will neUTplay hockey again His No \h 
should be worn much more prominenlly than 
the Marlins are wearing Fernandez 's No .12 

I do feel had lor fernande/ This could very 
well have been his only chance to pitch in the 
World Scries, but in no way does his injury 
deserve the same effort and tnbutc as a death or 
near-death 

Maybe one of the reasons the .Marlins were 
able to heat the Braves iha. ha. Sun Dec) and 
reach the World Series isai ihcir team unily 
the same unity they re showing in wearing their 
fallen leam mate's No. 32 but it's a moral 
responsibility to draw a line soniewhere 

Otherwise, whenever sometme hobbles 
olT the licld, a iribule will be made, one 
which will belittle all previous tributes to 
those who were truly deserving and those 
who truly sulfered 



Soccer 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

fht> year, a S5tK) fd Chanrand Memorial 
Scholarship will be awarded to a K-State soc- 
cer pluvcr 

I he tournament begins at 6 tonight with a 
lealurc game between the K- State and 
Lntvcrsity of Kansiis women's teams 

Alter the women's game and a vtHith 
game, the K-State men's soccer team will 
liice the Cmvcrsity of Kansas. 

The K --Stale men's team has a 2-1 record 



against Kansas this season 

The top two Big 12 finishers m the tour- 
nament will qualify lor the National 
Collegiate Soccer Association's National 
Tournament in Phoenis. 

With an K- 1 record on the season, the K- 
State men's stKcer club is lull of confidence 

Dan Feimsler. lunior in chemical engi- 
neering and club member said he likes the 
team's chances lo do well this weekend 

"(tur team has really come Utgetber." he 
said "We have a great chance of (|ualifying 
for the NC SA Nationals." 



You missed the game to work the conceeelon stand. 

You spent your Saturday cleaning the highway. 

You studied hard to make that honorary. 



Get Recognized! 

More tlian 250 organizations make K-Stat© great. 
Make sure your group is in tine 1998 Royal Purpla 






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These organizations are scheduled 
to have their pictures taken on 

Tuesday, October 25 



9:20 p.m. - Student Alumni 3oard 



Jn a^n^Jk a t t a n 

rHi oriicikt ouisi to Kttjiii looiittt wiikino) in tmi littii Atril 

Gameday Manhattan i$ the All- 

Foothall Edition of the Collegian. 

Published on Home-game 

Saturdays. 

Follow the Cats all the way to their 
FIFTH STRAIGHT BOWL. 

Pick up your copy at 



Pictures will be t.iken in McCTain 324. 
The Ki>ydl Purple yearbook can be purch.iH-d at this time for $24.95, 



Schedule an appointment for your organization in 103 Kedzie for $15 
You can also get a sound \^e for the CP-ROM supplement for $5 

IT" o y A L 



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FmOAY, OCTOBtR 24, 1W7 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



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IVAN K01M/CQ>ll^>ar> 
RKH ALLEN, senior In iheoler, eats on egg roll during an egg-roll ealing compelilion in the Union Stateroom 
Despite eating 10 egg rolls in three minutes, Allen came in second. The winnef ale 12 egg rolls 



73-year-oid praspective juror believes 
was pawn in bombing plans 



ASIOCUnD MISS 

DINVf-R Dcscrihmi; icrry 

NidHiKasa'Tiito-liHtkini;"' \',mu\\ nun. 
u rt'lircil Icdcrul irmplirvfc spftiikiiird 
WciincsJii) that \ii-h(>l>. tta\ u ixmn in 
Tinuiih) MtVciglts pltn m 
homh an OkLihitmii t ily 
Mcnit hit tiding:. 

I \k p^o^fK'(.'tl\^• juntr in 
Niv'hoK' iruil xaid she Wij.^ 
surprisi'd v,\ki\ NilIioU wa.s 
I'h.irt^al m Ihc hitmhin(^ at 
Ik- AllVal r, Murrad I L'di.Tal 
Huikllitt!, whkli killed MiK 
pciipk' and injured liundrcd*. 
iiwrL- 

"Well. I kind 111 liad the 
idcu I'roni the uay thai things 
were iranvpirini! thai hi- 
priihuhls didni di> U," siid 
ihc 7_U)LMt-i>lil IVnscr-arta 
)>rv:at-grandn)t)ihL'r 

"My personal view *as 
McVeigh *as a very strtmg- 
mindcd type of mdj\ idiml," she xaid "I 
think tnaylx- Uc had a >triing eiiuugh per- 
sonality that [K'tipk' vuTc alraid not in go 
alnn): with ulial he said" 

The wiiinan ealled llic April iv, 
IW5, btinihinj; a "^»t\ ihin;;.*' and she 
^ald MiVei^li's eitnvielnw and death 
scntcnec were "eui and dried." 

"I think ihey knev* I'rom the get-i;i> 



thai he had done what he did. V^ hether 
he did It ahine it not. ihaiV someihing 
we'll never knmv,"' she \aid 

As a titrnier bureau id land 

Managenieni employee, the woman said 

siie atiyhl not Iv ahle to set aside (he 

knowledge that she eivuld ha\e 

(»(• woded m a homhed-itnt led- 

eral huilding "I'm still al'raid 
Th« popuUon li gef „,■ n^^|,,f ,ry^,|,^;' ^^^^ ^,j 

unq woy out o) Kond, siie alMt ei.niplaineil to IS 

ond 01 much moneji m | ji^inci Judge Richard Malsch 
ii tost) lo leep on indi- .ib,,,,! bernj.* sunimtmed lor 
Kiduol m prpKjn and jury duly at least oike a year 
KoKe them on deoih X|i^. wuman is one of near- 

ro* for 1 5 pOfi |uit ly I IKI prttspt'el l\ e jurorN whn 
gti it over wllk have heen ijiieslioned sinee 

\iehols' trial began Sept 24 
• E}enver'arM The process entered the ISili 
gnohgrandmothw, d.iy Wednesday I'roseeutots 
a ^loipecfive |ufoi in VI id a jury eiiuhl he seated hy 
Nicholi' Hiol the middle of next week 
^4> Uihers gueslioned 

Wednesday included a 
Iknver-areu seliiml district 
employee, an amaieui soteer eixieh, a 
S( teat tonal teacher and a ski resort prop- 
erty niiinager who told tlie iiidge she 
would he hilier if chosen lu serve on the 
luiy 

"I've been working for ft\e year\ to 
!:ei to tins p«)ini to be ahle to run Ihe 
business. ' the wt)man said "I wouhl lose 
a biy opportunity " 



She recalled being stunned uhen she 
saw pictures of the devastalmn caused 
by I he bomb, saying they showed injured 
eliilJren and chaos 

She alstv said Ihe death penalty should 
be imptised nuire otien bcvause govem- 
nienis sp(.'nd imi much tiumey on conv iels 
who have no remorse tor llieir e nines 

"The population is gelling way out of 
hand, and as much nioiivy as it costs to 
keep an individual in prison and have 
them on death row tor 1.^ years, just get 
II over wnh," she said 

McVeigh's jury was seated alter w 
prospectiv e jurors were queslioned iwer 
a 1 7-day period last spnng 

Authorilies have alleged McVeigh 
and Nichols planned the bombmg 
months in advance to avenge the deaths 
of abt>ul Kl) jieoplc m ihe government's 
raid on ihe [(ranch Dav idians eoniponnd 
ncuf Waco, Te^as, in April IW.l 

Ihey contend Mc\eigh recruited 
Nichols to help acquire eomp*inenis an*! 
eonslruet the aminoniutn nitrale and luel 
oil homb 

IX'lense attorneys say Nichols didn i 
kMcm about the boinhmg in advance and 
was at home in lleringlon, Kan., when 
Ihe blast occurred. 

Nichols, 42, IS charged with murder, 
cunnpirucy and weapuns-related counts 
m ihe btmibmg If cnnvieled he faces 
Ihe death penalty 



HOMECOMING 1997 

Congratulations to the Homecoming Spirit Winners: 

SlutleiU Orgaiii stations: 

[liark SitHlfiil liiioi) 
Residf'ricf Miill/S<holaishi|> Hmise Division: 

l^' Slroiif' ( iuitiplrx 

2'"' .SiiiiHtlnsailr/Siiiilli/MiHirc 

:i'<l Fun l/lliivtiiakct 

Miuliilt/Wisl 

(fiHiilnow 

Greek Division: 

bt Delia Delia Di-lla/llii (lainriia Drltii/Sigma Chi 

Alpha \i Dt'lla/\l|iha Tail (tinrga 
(faii)rna l*hi licla/.Si^ina I'lii KiisiJoti/Dfltii laii Dftla 
Ka|i|ia '\l|tlia Thrla/Phi Kappa riicla/Dr-lla Sigrtia I'hi 
Kappa Kap|ia («aiiiiiiii/U4-la Tlirta l'j/'\l|iliii (iainttia Khu 
(ilii Onx-^a/Di'lla li{)hilori/l.,anilHla Chi Alpha 



llh 
5th 



jih 

r>iiinif) 



c()N(;rvtiilati()ns to the nkwk-statk ambassadors 

JASON HKINKICH AND SARA RESER 

And a big thank you to all of ttie cariipus ami conimunity 
groups tfiat made Homecoming 1997 a success: 

Htirh Kiihfl, IR^ and Panhrllrnic Miiriur Hoaril 

(imiticil Kuyduii Rolirl atid Hec Servicer 

KSU A.ssocialiiin of NcF^itlcnci* Mall.'* b)lt'ta Sump aiul Facilities 

K-Stalc Mari'hiiifi Itand Hallards .S[Hirling (itHxIn 

Uiiioti IVofrrarii Cdiiiu-il WlUli'iit Spirit 

(.ilaKMV Cuts* Count r) Cift Shop 

KSII Chrr-r Si(iiu.l anil Willif KKtJCK 

.Student Alumni Board Aileen Cray and thi* United Way 

Frofn theAII-Unmsit}fHofnecoming Commiffee and the KSU Alumni Associotion 



Get 
interactive 

with the 
eCollegian. 



cottegian.ksu.edu 



mm 



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your 



Six ways to make 
life a little easier . 



and your home a whole lot safer. 

Natural gas is a safe, efficient fitel - 
if you 11 keep these simple suggestions in mind. 



>\\\v 




Foi/ow your nose. (", ' "7"^ 

in )tj naurat stote. the gos that ( _V'~S^-N 
fliek ^«x/r home « odoHfss So KflL ( lo^^C^Tl/ 
odds rrwcafMon - sutetonce that O 
smefc, weW. (nkc nofle/i eggs, 

iffOii smeW gm, get out Don't 
stride a match, flip a ftgtit switch, 
turn on a fiashltght, or even 
use four phone. 
Arr^ of these con 
create o sportc Cother 
fvuf fam^ and pets 
and catt us from a neighbor's phone. Diai 
1-90O-T94-47i(i, and vve'ff tie there to checik it ot/t 

Inspect for perfection. 

Make regu/or vniioi (nspectioni ofgai oppliarKei to 
makt sure the burner fiame is bummg bkit. A yeUow 
fhmc indkata the ^1 a not borrMng proptrtf. Be iure 
not to b'ocik oir mtokti around apptiancei such as 
\^^1 )t jumacei. to aUow ample oxygen (few 
// vl for pmper burning 

Have your goi furnace checked 
by a quatiped heating and 
cooling contractor on on 
onnuot bam Oean or replace 
t. heating system oir 

/liters ot teoif once a 
month Check ffuei ond 
chimney to motie lufe ^ey're \Kntmg property. 

Be informed about 
carbon monoxide. 

Carbon monoMide n udoflets • y«t rt can be <}uAe 
hazardous Headache, diutnesi, fatigtte, excessive 
ptnpinillor\,and nouiec art some cfthe many lyrriplorm 
ofpolioning /ronr unbumed fuel If you luspea carbon 
morxMtide poisoning, leave the buMing. Phorfc 9 f f , the 
number of your loco/ emerjency response ofjon/iotion 
(fin or poke dlcpoftrr^ent) or KW. ot t-»0O'794-47S0, 
pom (mother (ocotion. 

Ifconuderwyg o carbon morwnide detector to help 
den your famify, took |br a detector chot meett these 
minimuiv ilondorrfi ~ emrtj on audible alarm, s 
UnderwTiten Lab Apprxtved ar\d heart the ACA Bkx 



Star CerVficate xd. Be suit to folhw the manufiaurer't 
instft/ctions for use ond placement 

Teoch your famity weW. 

tet your children know what you're doing to make your 
home safe Teach them the signs of possible gos leaks 
ond carbon monoxide posoning, and what they should 
do if they suspect either Make sure they follow these 
other common sense, safety tips 

• Don 'I use a gas range or undented spoce heater as 
a heatmg source in your home. 

• Make sure the goroge door is open before 
starling automobrles. 

• Ahvoys stort lawn mowers ond snow biOwers outside 
your garage. 

• Never gfitf inside on eiKhsed porch or garage 





Look for UM tooling out for you. 

Most KPL natural gas lines are underground 
Trained KPt pertonnel conduct borough and reguhr 
checks of our buried noturof gos lines to ensure they 
ore fret of leaks. Before doing any digging, simply 
call us toll free at t-»0O-DIG-SAFE (344-7233). 
Welt be happy to help by marking underground gas 
line locotions at no charge - with a two day notice. 

Catt on ut to help. 

If you hove questxm. cat t-tOO-794^7»d Were here 
with answers If you have corKemSk McVget them taken 
core of A^f aH we're here to serve you. We're KPt 
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..^^./oA. 



10 



KANSAS SfATE COLUGIAN 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1997 



Fort Hays State 
to offer courses 
through Internet 



ASSOCIATiO PtiSI 

TOPEKA. Kan K>rt Hays 
Stale University will use ihc 
Internet and nlhcr lechnology to 
provide urtJcrgriiilualc courses to 
residents ot To|Kka and eastern 
Kansas next spring 

The dctisiiin was spurred by a 
recent iKlion of the Kansas Board 
of Regents to allow six state uni- 
\erNities to otTer distanee learning 
courses outside ihcir traditional 
geographic boundaries. 

"There are a lot of pcHipte who 
are just not able to pick up and 
move to a regents etinmvunity or 
lake courses at Washburn," said 
lidward Hammond, university 
president. \Vashburn University is 
m Topclia 

"(lur distance learning tech- 
nology gives us the flexibiliiy of 
meeting people's educational 
needs when they want, at a place 
they want and the way they want." 
he said. 

Studenis will complete the 
courses al their nwn pace using 
videotapes, the Internet and two- 
way interactive video, 

"You could do 11 all through 
videotape if you wanted," 



Hammond said. 

Hammond said the interactive 
tcehnnlogy is helpful when stu- 
dents have questions. He said stu- 
dents can e>mail questions to prt^ 
fessors. and profcssiors can 
respond with e-mail 

Regents rules still prohibit 
I on Hays Siaie from ofTering tra- 
ditional classes in the territones 
of the other stale universities. 

Hammond said Ihc y5-year- 
old school the fastest growing 
of the regents universities with a 
fall enrollment of 5,616 will 
olTer a pilot program for those 
with at least Hi college or com- 
munity college credit hours who 
want to finish a bachelor of gen- 
eral studies degree 

Additional courses and degree 
programs will be olTerwJ next fall. 

Hammond said Fort Hays 
State's distance learning program 
isn't designed to lake students 
away from Washhurn, the 
University of Kansas or K-Stale 
It was created to meet the specific 
needs of some sludcnti desiring to 
increase their skills to gci or keep 
a)ub. 

"It's designed to help Kansans 
be competitive," Hammond said 




JEFF COOKt r.,ila^,an 
CARS DRIVf pa if Wildcat Amoco oo Anderson Averiue Thursdoy night. Goi prices hove dropped below $1 at moil stotioos tn Monholtan dofing (he poit tvyo 
doyi oftei being oboul $) 10 lor the pail few months 



I 



Legislators debate control of center 



ASSOCIAriD PtESS 

T()l*f;KA. KAN Some members 
arc not convinced the Legislature needs 
to approve quickly a bill designed to 
keep the University of Kansas Medical 
Center's hospital financially stable. 

The bill would turn operation of the 
hospital m cr to a public authority with 
a btiard of directors, rather than have it 
under the direct control of state govern- 
ment KU olTieials believe the change 
would allow the hospital to compete 
more etTcclively with private hnspitak 
litr patients 

KU Chancellor Robert Hemenway 
;ind medical center olTicials testified 
Wednesday during a meeting of the 
Legislative Budget t'ommtttec. which 
IS reviewing the bill Hemenway said 
legislators need to resolve their ditVer- 
ences quickly 

liut aller the meeting. Rep Henry 
Helgcrson. D- Wichita, said. "Therc^ no 



reason to run it through very quickly." 

Both houses approved a version of 
the bill during the \^^^ session, but a 
conference committee of three sena- 
tors and three representatives could 
not reach an agreement The bill will 
be before the conference commitiec 
when the l**y8 session begins in 
January 

Hemenway said he would like the 
authority to a.ssume control of the hos- 
pital by June .1(1 The authority would 
be similar to the one that operates (he 
Kansas Turnpike. 

The medical center has faced finan- 
cial problems in recent years, as man- 
aged-care programs have become more 
prevalent, especially m the Kansas ( ity 
metropolitan area Managed care 
emphasises home care over lutspiiali/a- 
titm. 

But Helgerson and Rep Melvm 
Neufeld. R-lngalls. were skeptical 
Wednesday that the medical center's 



financial problems are moa- senous 
than those of other hospitals, particular- 
ly in rural areas 

Neufeld said the most crucial issue 
IS the composition of the authority's 
board House members want legisla- 
tors, appointed hy legislative leaders, as 
permanent members 

Neufeld said having legislators on 
the btiard ensures adequate oversight of 
hospital operations 

lie said the medical center wants 
quick passage because, "the longer it 
hangs around, the more likely it is that 
there will be legislative oversight thai 
means something " 

Sen Dave Kerr. R- Hutchinson, 
chairman of the Senate Ways and 
Means ( onimiitce, said he is puzzled 
by some I louse members' seeming lack 
ol trust of the medical center 

"li seems to mc they don't want to 
accept answers at face value," Kerr 
said 



Doctor convicted in fire deaths 



ASSOCIATtD MKS 

OLATHU. Kan A former doctor 
w ho was conv icted in the fire deaths of 
two ot her children has hired a new 
attorney, .i possible prelude to a chal- 
lenge to her conv ictton and sentence 

Debora dreen. of Prairie Village. 
Kan . pleaded no contest in .\pril IWd 
and was convicied of two counts of 
first -degree murder in the deaths of her 
son. lim farrar. l.V and one of her iwo 
daughters. Kellv farrar fi 

A third child. Kate farrar. then 1 II 
years old. escaped thiiuigh an upstairs 
window as fire ravaged the family's 
home in the Kansas ( ity suburb of 
I'rainc Village on Oci 24. I'W5 

In her no-contest picas to murder, 
arscin and aiiempied murder, dreen did 
not admit setting the falat I ire or trying 
to kill her older daughter and her 
estranged husband hut acknowledged 



the stale had enough ev idcnce to con- 
vict her 

She IS now in the fopeka 
Correctional lacilitv and must sene al 
least -Id years beliire she becomes eli- 
gible for parole 

The plea limited Circe n's appeal 
options, but K,insas law allows prison- 
ers to file other legal challenges even 
atler exhausting their appeals 

Citeen's new attorney, Kurt P 
Kerns, of Wichita, has contacted the 
lawyers who nrpresentetl her earlier 
and has asked for a transcript of het 
proceedings m Johnson County 
District C ourt 

Kerns said Wednesday that he could 
not discuss any spciiific strategies uniil 
he had reveivcd allllie records 

Johnson County District Attornev 
Paul Morrison, who prosecuted (ia-en. 
said inmates oDen try to have convic- 
tions and sentences overturned by 



attacking tlw lawyers who represented 

ihciti Such acltons ,ire rarely success- 
tiil he said 

"Debor.i (ircen is not going to 
escape rcsponsibilny tor her actions 
through this l.iw." Morrison said. 

(irccn's former .itlorney said he 
would not commcni until .i new .iction 
IS filed 

Prosecutors have said (ireen. who 
IS in her niid-4Us. u-t the fire lo hurt 
her husband, l)r Michael larrar. 
because he planned to divorce her I le 
was liv ing apart Irogii the laniily when 
the fire broke out 

tircen was accused ol putting a 
lovk derivative ol cisior beans in 
I jirar's l4Hitj several imie> befoa' the 
lire, nuking hi in ill and sending him to 
the hospital 

I arr.ir. a cardiologist, neetled hrain 
surgery to repair d.iinagc caused by the 
easior bean derivative 



RELIGKON DIRECTORY 



First Lutheran 

10th Poyntz S37-8532 
Worahip 

Set 5 30pm. Sun 8 30 A II am 
Sunday School all agm 9 40 a m 



Yc 



our C^liiirch 
Could be Here 




First Bapi j isl Church 



Sunday Worship 1 1 a.m. 
Church School 9:45 a.m. 

Kor fref iransportation within city 
limits, call ihcchurih 

Pastors Karen & Alan Sellg 

2121 Blue Kills Rd. 

539 8691 

An Aniericin Rfitist Cof^gii'grdition 



® 



Jirst t ihiircli 
of the N,i/.irciie 



Mt»HNlN(; WHKsmiMI»i*la.iii 

I VI NINt.l'KAISF. .....Mm pill 

SUNI WY St ;j K KH- Jf-.y^i a.iii 

t ( )! I F.C.E , .,. ...y:.lCla,iii 

.^1.11 Kiinktll 

"j.Vi-fi.iTf. (p,ntor) 

S.V».2li!i) (cburvh) 

I'ai Wcvrjuili. l*,astor 



'^pfe"| 



EOlCiWISCElll 

1021 Denlson 

ECM Is the Campus Ministry of 

the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A., 

8 the United Church of Christ 

Sunday Supper 5:30 
Sunday Bible Study 6:30 

David Jones*Campus Pastor 
daJones(®ksu edu 

539-4281 




Lutheran 
^ Campus 
Ministry 

at Luther Hous« 1 745 AnderMm 

Sundajy Worship 7:15 p.m. 

in the Danforth Chapel 

PmIot ]ayn* ThompiOM 

(paMtorj<Sksu.tduf 

539-4451 

— Open to All — 



>2CS VEATVICW 

' Qv^CONMUNTTY CHUDCH 

Sunini Sttuidni. ^<P' ^" •< 
rS p m . it Wetlvitw Hervue 

Morning Worship 

8:30 & 10:45 a.m. 

Sunday school 9:4S a.m. 

College Career CUsies Offered 

Siiiuj.iy KvcninK Worship 6 p.m. 

Inl Sunday 

(ARE CELLS (Small Gr«up») 

2, .1, 4 Sunday 6 p.m. 

MJOI Ft Ri lev Blvd. .SST-TlTa 



FIRST UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

8:30 & 11 a.m. Worship 

9:45 a.m. Church School 

inctudtng Univefsity 

aixJ Young adiiH classes 

Nursery provided 

Omer G. Tittle, Pastor 

612 Poyntz 776-8821 

DIAL-A-PRAYER 776-9569 



•^^firist^utfuran (Church 

Missouri Synod 

Mission 

776-2227 

9 a.m. Sunday School 

& Bible Class 

10:30 a.m. Divine Worship 

K8U - DANFORTH 

CHAPEL 



Church of Christ 

25it(M)ickensflue. 

Sunday Bible Cta.ss ^:U) am 
Worship I OJOa.m, 6:00 pm 

M I d week S t ud y 7 : 3 p ni U'ei I 

Cats For Christ 

Campus Ministry 
bcmin^flinthilts.com 

(785)5^^-fi5Hl 



St. Luke's 

Lutheran Church 

The Wcl|om<: Place 

Suujulax III I 



<i 1^ .1 in Siiiul.ivMtil'l ^ ItiKli Studv 

1 1 (Mt J m ( iiMlti)l|ft«ftrv Scrviti- 

<fl 4S II nt%4l lrll<iw%hi|> 

Mlp //pages prodigy com/st f u ke& 

330 SunMt Ave. 539-2604 



First Congregational 
Churcti 

700 Poyntz (PoynU and Julielte) 537-7006 

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. 

AtJult Ed. Class 

Worship 10:45 a.m. 

Sermon 

/ lyty?^ i^'Bc yond the Amefican Dreafn' 

ki ^ Guest Speaker 

^ R Rev Hams Wallenei 

\^.W Sundty. Oct. 26 

^^•"•"' Rev Oonnlfll ongbolloin 



Join US llii- SliirLi) ! 

College Heights 
Baptist Church 

2221 College hleightsi Road 
(on Anderson, across from 
KSU Foundation building) 
College Bible Study 915 a.m. 
Fellowship Hall 
Worship Service 10:30 a.rn. 



Grace 
Baptist 
Church 




JVd) tlivt™, 2Wk» ( ulSilh Child 



♦ Sunday ♦ 
Mornint; Wiirsliip 
H:I5& 10:45 a.m. 

liiNc I ki.'.'.f. I in AJI .\t!c> H 111 .1 111 
lliidy I. ill' III ( iirc CVII> () p m 



776-0424 



Living Water Ranch Church 



\i. vtliii.iv Ml ^11^ M \ liJvu I i^ii>. i< 
iikji Kcnrvih tlj|iift Mini^trtr\ 

SIMUV 

Svrvii'v II): ill u m. 
SiltiHi! lit HiNi- 4 1(1 II 1)1 

Siiiiiliiy. ^ p III 

Siiiuln> Itritiuk .I'll 'Hl< it in 

Wrdnctiiav "^i"'^ h^' 7 Ki p m 

til 1*1 IM. ■ll>IHani%-l<A.MI»H 

I Ik, il,.t r .' <i>.l,, iM.Mh ><P lullkr I 'i^'^ IliKM 

lUTfl oil Ma > I I Al t\K ^Itfll 

ijinw l.l\INt. M /« t I'M l>M. 
4 11 SHI 'M(.. K*> Ah* 111 



(«J|.^) 4li« -UilS 




2310 Candle wood 
537-76J3 



Sunday j^hool 9:50 a.m. 

I Suv^ Sduoi CItn ^3Ui^ i < Wed. Pami ly Night 7 p m 
Hiprtc Siixi^ Sdwl Clw9J«alf^ -^nith (iroup 
Wiii ship Service 10:30 sm ^^uLRangcrsi 

Evening Praiae 6 p m • Mil 



Nurstry Provideel For All Seryfcfi. 



St. Isidore \ 

Catholic Student 

Center 

iVUSSSCHEDlLE 

Tucida^ 'TKur»il» 10:00 p.m. 

Friday ll:l»p.ni, 

Kaiurd» 9 p.m. 

Sunday 9J0 a.m., 1 1 a.m., 9 p.m. 

C'oiiffiiioni Saturday 4 p.m. 

Fillirr Kdlli ^^rtHr. riiipliln 

7 1 1 tX-niMin 534-744^1 



Manhattan Mannonlto 
Church 

Sundiy Sctvo e 30 *m.. Wowv 10 « * m 
Eldon EM). PallOf 
ICHIt and PrMwH S»-«07S 

Qifta ani) abilrlifls Sunday 



First 
,,, - Presbyterian 
^^^ * Church 

A Wclcoiiiing Church 

Sunday Schw^l 

9 A.M. 

Sunday Worship 

1030 AM 

AUemativc Wursliip 

5:00 PM 

xdt LmvtffiworthSt |7K5j 537-l)slH 




CRESTVIEW 
CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

tnyjltsJ) WiWitp \0M ii.iti. i 6<X) p.m. 

Sunday School ^16 d.m. 

Chinese Worship 10: JO ,i.m. 

4761 Tutlle Creek Blvd. 

ty miirt ni'tth o( Kiinb,ill Avf ) 

776-37^8 



St. francb 
CanterBury 
'Episcopal' 
Campus 'Miniat 




i (lllti'lll|M.lll\i- 

) Uil\ I III li.ii i-'i 

111 fliint'orth Ch(i|>«>l 

t \\[\ .Siitiilay .11 

S ft. in. 

< liitii It'll 11 tti', inn 
♦ *•♦♦*■♦ 

I 111 h.in\i .unl < iiiit.ir 

(.IDll .1 nil .tl. tlUl!) 

MONl>AYS 

.11 (i )i III 

ll,lptl%l t .llll)l|l'> ( I'llU't 

[ws iitriiri tilAiidiTsmi 

iiml I >t-)iiM'iiJ 



FIRST 
CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 7 



Contcriit'H)i.ir\ \Vlll^lllt1 H .III a in. 

Tniilitioiiul Wiirship Mi:'»5 am 

Church Sch»nil •*:4.^ urn. 

l.iw KroiiitL'aKi 1 1 10 am 

AtigchJS t<J5 .\ PM) 

Wed. I ve Bible Study 

COLL EG i: FKLLOWSHIP 

riiiirsdiiy 7:30 p.m. 



f>ASI(lR UK IMINAI 111 
5th& lluinholdt 



HRI/AVAR 
776-lt790 



\ 



p * ■ ■ » ■ * < 




A4E EDnOS 

uatrnmoH 



KANSAS STATE C 01 IE G I AN 




FRIDAY, OCTOBCft 24, \ 9 9 7 



II 



DAI LYcros sword 



ACROSS 

1 Hot tub 
4 Indubi- 

W»»y 
7Milc« 
Motley's 
neighbor 
11 Information 
13 "— Lazy 
Wver 

14 Thought 

15 Sheltered 

16 Trouble- 
isden 
ipaoe 
•Mon 

17 imMcales 
approval 

It Emulate 

Mr. CNps 
20 Tranquil 
22 Charged 

particle 
24 Stock 

footage? 
n II gats in 

your hair 

32 "Hurrah!" 

33 Pop flavor 

34 Twisted 

36 Passe! 

37 Mosey 

38 Lines 
41 trfcCor- 

mick's 
invention 
43 Singer 
Davis 



44 Fine 
46 Pugsley's 

papa 
50 Knights d 

sci-fi 
53 Protrude 
55 Jay's nval 
50 It takes 

ttwcake 

57 Milwaukee 
product 

58 Former 
partners 

59 Dislorted 

60 Whammy 

61 Passbooi^ 
abbr. 

DOWN 

1 Bat a grtal 

2 Pope John 
Paul II e.g. 



3Qao- 

metefs 

find 
4 "Dellciousr 
SQrand- 



6 Actress — 
JeaskM 
Parker 

7 What a dot 
may maan 

SBolher- 

ation 
B Flushed 
10 Acapuico 

articki 
12 What a 

dot may 

mean 
19 Quick tnp 
21 Arching 





Solution thna: 


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Saturday'a anawer 



10-27 



Shot 
23 Promptly 
25CfOoner 

Jerry 
26lnoe8* 

santly 
27 Starts a 

garden 
26 "Lion King" 

baddie 

29 Base 
mnrar's 
goal 

30 Histohc 
Spanish 
duke 

31 Qrp. of 
muaiciBna 

35 Popeye's 

form ol 

"to be* 
33 TV cartoon 

cat 
40 Tatier 
42 Hindu 

prince 
45 Year-end 

celebration 
47 Long dress 
4«Tied 

49 Strip of 
dtnjspeel 

50 Position 
91 Prior night 
S2Uir 

54 John 
Ritter's 
dad 



1 i a ^^^4 t 


i ^Ht i i 10 


1" 


il 


mw ^s IP 




WL 


a mm* 




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Twri R^P" 




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*- 


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gTi mUgtiO Fo( ans<vgfi lo loday'a cfOMwwd, call 
91 lllHr Clli 1-900454-4873 )d9c per minute, touch- 

tone / rotary phone* (iB^oniy i A KififlF«aiutea»«rv>cc. NYC 

10-27 CRVPTOQUIP 

WMS QSWSHWGPS MXQ 

WD JSWGJS CSHXRIS MS 

QSPSYDFSQ HYRSIWJDFMDCGX. 
Saturday's Cryptoqulp: THE GRAND CANYON 
MIGHT EASILY BE DESCRJ6ED AS THE HOLE OF 
FAME 

Today's Cryptoquip due: H equals C 



LOOKINGback 

l>>*)2 - The \V'ortiJ Scries wuk wtin h>' a k-mii oulvjJc the Untlctl 
Slulcs Ihis d;iy. Il was j tiiM lor hascball. The Toronto Hluc iays op- 
turckl ihc titk' in Ihc i^iMlt t!'>ii)<-' nl the stncs ova the Athinu t4ra\c^ 
four jjaincs to two 

14.19 ■ WmiK'n's nyliiii hoMtry went tin sale liir ihe I'itM time ilio 
Juy al WilniiMjiton Dry ttoods in Wilmin^lon. f)el 



ADhoc 




^^ 




JtAN CHfN, gradiioie student m economics, looks at photograph; Iroin the 'Earttt Artgels Migignl Children in Ametico' series m Ihe K-Slale Student Union Art Gallery on Thursday 
nhernoon Forry-one color photogrophs ore featured in the diiploy in the Union through Now 1 

Photo exhibit portrays migrant life 

> "Earth Angels: 
Migrant CniLDRiN 

in America" will be 
in the Union 
Gallery until Nov. 
4. Gallery hours 
are 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Monday 
through Friday 
Admission is free. 



KUSSf U rotTMCVfll 

The United Slalc% might be a 

n.ilion of immigrants ^^ilh a liistt>- 
ry riddled wilh pei>ple trying to 
explain themselves 

■\i limes, the country ha.s been 
}>ihh1 to its rural min>igniiUs. At 
111 her times, especially during 
those (iliinpscd in "hanh Angels," 
.in eiinbitiim of photography by 
NaiK') Buirski, it has been cruel 

Huirslti. foreign photo editor 
lor the New "^'ork Times, ha.s orga- 
ni/ed a simple phoio essay of con- 
tempuniry rural inigrani farmer 
life, an essay of rare emoiuw and 
humanity The shtw closes Nov 4 

The show is a siiinnint! csam- 
pte of i>ikh1 phoiojournalism a 
narrative photography ihal hardly 
nevds, yet is strengthened, by I he 
cxplanativc panels accompanying 
It And what subject matter could 
resonate niore in ICantias, a stale 
ihtit IS seeing a large influx of 
immigrants finding ui^rk in ratio* 
ries, fields and the beef industry " 



It's interesting to note thai 
(larden Cily and mnumeiable 
oihet soulh Kansas cities are see- 
ing their seluHils and public insti- 
lutions becoming represeniaiivc 
ofmuny cultures und backgrounds 

particularK Suuth Asian and 
Latin American 

There is a ditrereiKC bclvkcen 
these I m migrant com mum lies and 
I hose ot migrunl workers, as por- 
irayet) in Uuirski's photos 
Migrant.s have less lime in one 
lociitiun before moving on to 
another har\esl. Therefore, they 
arc a Horded even fewer luxuries, 
such as modern plumbing, heat, 
decent lurniiure and health care 

Migrant cuhure. although cen- 
tral to ICansai. history since ihe 
stale was setlled by non-Nalive 
Americans in the [HiMh, is nu 
longer something Kansans can 
shrug off on California, 
\hashington, lexas. New York and 
Klonda, though Huirski's pho- 
tographs were all taken in those 
slates In fact, these photos could 



be lakeii .ins where in the f nncil 
Slates 

Jusi ujilkin^ into a resl.tur.im 
in VKichilj .uid ihtcou'iuii: the 
entire stall spe.iks heller ^panlsh 
than I ngliiih, one leali/es the 
.ippioacltntg di\ersiiy ul Kansa-s. 
Iltn^ are the 1»o iiihities totlid- 
uig. fcauilev),!) oi vvietchedK ' 

01 course, ihat'-k ,i dilficuit 

l|llC^!ltl|l lo ,UI\«CI Itlll if 

Buirski's work I- m\ indu.iiion. 
perhaps ilw l.tttet is itue kians.is 
mi;!hi iioi hj\e the acres ol 
migrant shun housing thai the 
farm communities ol cenlr.tl 
t alifornia shcltci. but in thai, we 
arc llic exception 

t lav mj.' In ed .1 goiid p:iri ol ttiy 
life III central I alilorni.i, tin nunv 
occasions I've swn Ihc (kwi tom- 
munilies. white and migrant 
I atino. imervecl m twith pi%itn e 
and negative ways 

Mavtiig a paieni who lau^hl 
I nglish in a farm conununilv 
school to iininttiraiit childicn. 
hoi It ley a I .iikl illegal, Itelpcd me 



lo ivali/e the gnnving disparities 
of life in Amcticj 

While I spent my time learning 
voiiiputets and liieraiure in high 
scluMtl, mv nugrani counterparts 
were slaying in schiwl onlv 
between harvests, learning rudi- 
mcnlatv skills and ficing a hard 
lilc 111 l.irm uitrk 01 vitv poverlv 
\i ativ time, their patctiis coiilj 
>h(ilt]c them back lo Mexico 
whcic l.ist V car's school lesson 
would s«Hin be forgotten 

lluiiski's photography onlv 
confirms ihe pi>int. How maiiv 
images ol I (v-year-ohls picking 
ciop>> ititcs one need to see tx'lore 
grasping the cruelties o! life ' 

And while mv ancestors 
worked many vears in Kansas 
whciit fields, they weri' woriing 
lot themselves 

I luniks lo massive government 
handouts of cheap, even frcY. land 
around the hirn ol the ceiitiirv. m> 
allce^lol^ »iwned their crops How 
niaiiv migntnt farmworkers can 
claim ihc same ' 



Viennese string quartet to bring awards, 
musical variety to McCain performance 



The Artis gmirtei will Iramtrorm McCain 
Auditorium into a consert hall of clissicul music 
aiKpm SaiurtUy 

The- McCain performance will include wwlu by 
SchuK'ri. Mo/an and Hrahnts ffK' qiurtel includes 
violinist fVtcr Vtiuhrnavei, cellist Othinar Mullcr, 
violist Herbert Kelcr and violinist Johannes Mciul. 

"They're performing music of Viennese com- 
pOKrf>. and I hey are a Viennese quunct." said 
{'itfhe (i raves booking agent tor Mel v in Kaplan 
Inc., which represents the i^uanet "I don*t know 
uf any nihcr VienncM quanet that performs as 
well as th<.7 do lt'» Viennese soul miuic." 

Since its formation in I4K() in Vienna. Austria, 
the (^uariei has rrccivcd mieniational avivards, 
including a (irand Prix du Ditque. several 
Diapasons d'Or and reci^niinjn at the fivian and 
Cambridge eotnpetiiionii. I lie group has alsio 
recorded exclusively with Sony Classical since 
IWtl 

In addition 10 its international awards, the 
quartet has traveled globally In its 1*)%'47 tour. 



the group performed in Japan, Thattand. Berlin, 
and London II has also played in Buenos Aires, 
Hawaii and Hong Kong 

This is not the first tnp to the continental 
United States for ihc quartet In November l*MS. 
the musicians completed Ihcir first extensive U.S. 
tow. Now the quartet is cximing to Manhattan 
from GroKsc Poinie, Mich , and will inivcl to l.os 
Angeles a Her its .stop in Kansas 

David f rain, a.vsistant director of McCain, said 
he cxpccis this performance to attract a variety of 
people. 

"As far as ige, w«'ll «e a wide variety." fram 
laid. "We cetiainly expect to sec a lot of ittu- 
dems." 

Frain said members of freshman seminar 
clttaea wk ■llending this performance for a class 



The pcrformatioe is sponsored by the Kansas 
Arts Commiation, the National Endowment for 
the Arts and the K-Statc fine Ann Fee 

To purchase tickets for the Anis Quartet, call 
S12-M28 Ticket pnc'cs are 116 for Ihc general 
public, S 14 for senitK citizens and SM for sludentsi 



Singers keeping busy 
throughout semester 



COIUN H, CRAIU 

I he IVpaiimcni of Music is botiming w iih acliuty this semester, 

said ileiald I'olicli. litrector of the Men's and Women's lilee Cluhs 
and the K '«tatc Singers 

I he I II si concert ol the senic-slcr fw h<nh groups was tki 10 m 
Met am \udiionum 

'lioili the glee cluhs aie f>nily well Kilanced as lo voice parts." 
I'olich '•aid "SwA 1I1C Women '>■ Ulee is larger than it has ever been ' 

Ihe Men's (ileetliib.esublishcd m IKflN. performs 2l) limes on 
.iverage ilurinp Ihe selimd vc.ir In ihe past few years the gioup has 
[K'llormcd 111 n.iliiinal seminars ,it Haiv.ird I'fliversity. Wisconsin 
and Washtiigiiin I lie Men's tilee Cluh even made a pilgrimage to 
Mexico 

IViltih Mill the men have Ken kepi busy thus |ai The Men's lilee 
( liib s,ing at ,1 Rovals ^ame Scpl 1^ .iml also sang at loui area high 
seluHils m the senile diiy 1 ailicr this nionih. ilk' K-Statc Men's and 
Wintien's tilee Clubs sang with the l!niveisit,v of Nebraska's Men's 
and Women's tilce Chibs in a concert in Lincoln, Neb. 

I his year the men hav c hsen mv ilecl lo sing ai a nulionul con- 
vention of the Ititercollcgiale Men's t honis April Ih-IM m 
Morehoiisi.' I ollege in .AtLinta 

SeeCI40W,Pogel2 



NUMBER9 



DILBERT 



Hl^ ''OU Two, \iAlT uc_ 1 

wr<*t Miv»fc ucAf ^tA^ 




wtLL.wt iun iH|tJK iT'v 
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12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, OCTOiER 34, 1997 



Alcohol ban not a response 
to incidents at other schools 



UKXIATID MISS 

KANSAS CITY. Mo The 

University of Missouri-Kansas City has 
banned alcohol from iis four fraternity 
houses, but a school ulficial said ihc 
four chapters aren't being punished 

The move also was not a response to 
recent alcohol-related problems atTcei- 
ing fraternities at two other schotils in 
Missouri, said Ernie StufHebean, stu- 
dent services coordinator at Ihc universi- 
ty's Student Life OfTice 

"Wc really started seriously thinking 
about this in the week before school 
started, but it actually goes back to 
February, when we went to the national 
conference on greek affairs." 
Stufflehean said 

He said two houses -- Lambda Chi 
Alpha and Sigma Phi Epsilon — had 
bans in place a week before the school's 
policy took effect Monday. 

The schools* three sororities have 
always had alcohol-free chapter houses, 
Stufflebean said 

The fraternities' endorsements of 
university policy weren't without dis- 
sent. Lambda Chi Alpha president Eric 



Baker said hut they're part of a trend 
that has seen increased pressure on fra- 
ternities tct crack down on alcohol abuse 

"A couple of guys who live in the 
house were concerned about it because 
they're 2 1 . and they won't be allowed to 
dnnk in the house," Baker said "But we 
decided if the university was going to do 
It, we were going to support il " 

Beta Theta Pi members at the 
University of Missouri -Columbia didn't 
have much choice hut to ban alcohol last 
week. The chapter had faced sanctions 
from the school and its own national 
organization afler an incident last month 
involving a drunken pledge. 

The pledge, who chapter ofTicials 
admitted had been drinking at the frater- 
nity house, ^vas hospitalized for two 
days aRcr being found injured on cam- 
pus. He said he did not remember how 
he got hurt 

Also last »«k, the Delta Chi chapter 
at Southwest Missouri Stale University 
had Its social functions suspended after 
Its third citation on charges of providing 
alcohol to minors. 

Fraternities aren't as prominent at the 
University of Missouri -Kansas City, 



where Siufllehcan estimated only 31X1 of 
the school's IIUHM) students are mem- 
bers of national fraternities and sorori- 
ties. Nor arc the living arrangements tike 
those at many other schools, where most 
of a fraternity's members live m-houu". 

"These are not what you would call 
traditional fraternity houses," 
Stufflebean said. 

"The largest one is the Ikta Theta Pi 
house, and only 18 students live there 
The others are in residential areas, and 
only five or so people live in each one ," 
he said 

Activities outside the chapter houses 
might involve alcohol, but Baker said 
fraternities still must comply with their 
national organization's restrictions. 

"The guidelines we have to follow 
from our nationals are actually stricter 
than what the university had before," 
Baker said "Wc can't furnish alcohol. 
and we're not al levied to charge money 
for an event where there's alcohol pre- 
sent. 

"We have to have a certain percentage 
of our chapter as sober party monitors, and 
we've rented out buses before to keep peo- 
ple from drinking and dnv ing " 



Genealogical society to provide 
workshop to probe 





HANONOUrtN 

Members of the Riley County 
Genealogical Society are having their 
35th Annual Workshop from S a.m. to 4 
p.m. Saturday in Pottorf Hall at CiCo 
Park. Admission is S20 and registration 
begins at 7 45 am. 

In 1 961 , a group of interested people 
in the community, led by Grace Woldl. 
founded the Riley County Genealogical 
Society. Il was chartered in 1963 

There are now 302 members interna- 
tionally One hundred fifty of those 
members arc from the Manhattan area 
The society's mam source of funding is 
membership dues. 

Genealogy is the study of family his- 
tories 

'Tamily history is important because 
It keeps families together," said Jane 
Brown, president of the Riley County 
Genealogical Society. "As we live in 
such a separate and mobile society, il 
draws us hack together and makes us 
proud, and pride is what we need to 
instill in our youth" 

Brown said the workshop has always 
been a tremendous success. 

"The purpose of the workshop is to 



bnng professional genealogy speskere 
into our community and help those who 
want to research iheir family history," 
Brown said 

There's another purpose for this 
year's workshop, 

"The society is trying to raise money 
for the expansion of the historic Plati 
House," she said "Wc have already col- 
lected between 512,000 and Si 5,000 
from members and area businesses We 
need S5(MXK) for the expansion. We 
hope to break ground for the new addi- 
tion before the first of the year." 

The }5th Annual Workshop will also 
highlight three speakers: Mary Jane 
Mclntire. a professional genealogist for 
22 years. Ruth Keys Clark, av id geneal- 
ogist for 1 9 years; and Terry \'an Meter, 
director of U.S. Calvary Museum. Fort 
Riley and U.S. Infantry Museum 

Clark's topic will be "Heraldry and 
the College of Arms." 

"Every family had a coat of arms," 
Brown said. "She's going to talk about 
the divisions and meanings of different 
ones and teach people how to research 
their own family's coat of arms" 

For people whose ancestors were 
involved with the military. Van Meter 



will discuss "Finding Your Ancestors 
Using Government and Military 
Records." 

Vendors will also be at the workshop 
to sell genealogical books, supplies and 
archival materials, Bessie Wray. work- 
shop chairwoman and member, said. 

She said there w ill be someone there 
to reproduce old photographs so people 
can get Ihem the same day 

The workshop is open to the public. 
The admission fee includes activities. 
lunch and a program. 

"Anyone interested in doing research 
on their family history should come to 
the workshop. It starts out as a hobby, 
but it's a hobby that becomes your life." 
Wravsaid. 




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campus news? 

The eCollegian gives you 

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too sty glow. 

There's even o crossword. 

collegian.lcsu.edu 



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West Virginia judge pleads no contest^ 
resigns in bizarre nose-biting incident 



MtOCIATIP PMH 

ST MARVS. W.Vi. — A judge 
accused of biting ■ dtfendvti's nose in 
his courtroom pletded no contest to 
battery and resigned Thunday. 

Joseph Troisi, a 47-ycar-old judge 
on the Pleasants County Circuit Court, 
could get up to a year in jail and a iSOO 
Fine fur the alleged attack June 26 
■gainst Bill Witten. 29 A ssentencing 
hearing was set for Nos 26 

Troisi still faces federal civil nghu 
charges carrying up to 10 years in pnMm 

"It once again proves that no matter 
who you are, you're not above the law," 
said Witten s father, Ray Witten. 

Troisi was accused of stepping 



down from the bench, taking off his 
robe and con- 

-~ »» 



ironiing Witten 
after the defen- 
dant cursed at 
the judge while 
being led out of 
the courtroom 
Afterward, wit- 
neises said, 
Troisi returned 
to the bench as 
if nothing hap- 
pened. 

Troisi 
claimed he did 

not intend to bite Witten. Witten suffered 
a bruise on the tip of his nose. 



HoUoween ]««int toh« 
the ntoti ap^oprlo** 
doy fw iuch Aangt 
and biivi* com at 
thii 

• loyWiMwi 

fothaf qI ulteged 
nos^bite oBock vidim 



■^•>' 



The incident iKCum-d after a hear- 
ing at which Trnisi refused to reduce 
Witten 's S4(I.IKJfl bail white the defen- 
dant appealed his sentence for grand 
larceny and illegally entering a busi- 
ness A half-do/en people in the court- 
room saw the incident. 

A report prepared for the stole 
Supreme Court said Troisi had a l(>n|:- 
standing inability to control liis temper on 
the bench. 

Troisi lost his temper 19 tintcs in the 
past tMt years, the report said 

Troisi 's arraignment on the federal 
charges is scheduled for Oct 3 1 

"Halkmecn seems to be the most 
appropriate day for such a strange and 
bizarre case as this." Rav Witten said 



Choir 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 1 

The Women's Glee Club, formed in 
1 89<). performs six times per year and is 
made up of 60 women. 

Emilie Lunsford. senior in humani- 
ties, IS both the president of Women's 
Glee Club and the alto section leader of 
the group. Lunsford acknou ledged that 
choir IS a big commitment for all mem- 
bers, especially the officers. 

"My commitment to this choir is 
tremendous." Lunsford said. "It has to 
be because I have to take care of a lot of 
business with the women that Mr Folic h 
doesn't ha\e time to do, so I have to 
commit a lot of time, which I don't mind 
a bit " 

However, the benefits of being in 
choir, Lunsford added, are many. 

"There's a feeling of belonging to 
something that constantly works toward 
a common goal." she said "You learn to 
cooperate m ith 20 to 30 people at a time 
It's tough sometimes, but «« are all 
friends and have a good time, which is 
the biggest benefit " 

Another benefit is the sound of a 
practiced harmony m performances 



"I love that fcehng when you hit all 
the nght notes and the harmonies are 
perfect," Lunsford said. "If it's some- 
thing that turns out totally perfect. I tend 
to gel shivers up and down my spme" 

The K-Slate Singers, a show choir 
that specialises in jazz, has the heaviest 
performance schedule, with JO to 45 
performances per year Some of these 
performances have been concerts, build- 
ing dedications, tSO Department of 
Defense and tours to Europe and Asia. 
The Singers have also performed at 
Worlds Fairs in Vancouver, British 
Columbia; Sew Orleans; and Knoxville. 
Tenn. 

Phil Garrison, junior in management 
and manager of the K-Statc Singers, said 
membership in K-State Singers requires 
not only a background in vocal music, 
but dance as well, because most of the 
pieces are choreographed 

Garison. who spends five to IK 
hours per week putting shous together 
for the group, said performing ts the best 
part about being involved in the group 

"Stepping on stage allows you to 
enter a different world for 45 minutes to 
an hour." he said "You become a differ- 
ent person " 

K-State Singers Jimi Pauls, senior in 




political science, and Rebecca Lewis, 
junior in .idvertisiny. agreed 

"I like (ti think that I am pleasing oth- 
ers when I pertwm.'" Lewis said 

Pauls added that it is miport^ni lu 
enjoy stnging, even when the rigorous 
rehearsal schedule ts a source nl stress 

"With rehearsal every day. you have 
to really enjov what you're doing to 
make ii worthwhile," Pauls said. 

Polich laces ihe task of choosing 
music that will appeal to both his stu- 
dents and audiences 

"It's always a challenge to find inter- 
esting music to sing," he said 

Pauls said after college opp»irtunities 
to sing will become more scarce and 
said she vmII enjoy singing for as long as 
she can 

"I don't ever plan to quil singing, but 
the opportunities to perform will cer- 
tainty be harder to find oiKe I'm out ot 
college." she said 

(iarrison said he wilt iieasufc the 
moments he has spent with the choir 

"This is mv tasi opportunity at 
singing in a great choir." he said, "so I'm 
trying to savor every mmuie" 

The choirs' nc\i big performance 
will tie ihcir ( hristmas concert, sched- 
uled for Det 14 



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OUESIIONSI 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1997 



CLASSIFIED AD WRITING TIPS 

^ Uil Jtwnt or MfvicM Ant Alwoyi put wltot item 
or service you are odverlising liril Thii helps poten 
liol buyers Imd who! ihey ore looking lor 
Dent WM obbrwviolioni. Many buyers ore con 
(used by abbrevialions. 

Conudsr including I(m price This tells buyers il 
ihey are looking at somelbing in their price ronge 



13 



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M CASH FOR COLLEGE 

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ADVANCED FUOHT 

TRAHMNO trom 7,000 
tiour ATP instructor Mullt 
engine ATP Ihrough singlii- 
engirte private Hugtt Irvm. 

DAVIS MtOVES special 
izing in commercial and 
rsnidential moves Vou 
pad(, will move Me wHI 
ioed your trudi or trailer, 
539-3996 

DID VOU FORQET 
VDUR 1M7 ROVAL 
HJRPLE with CD-ROM? 
Pit* It upTODAV In 
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atlll b« purctMkMit 
wMte lupplle* last for 
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DR. LOVES AOult Video 
Cd^^atii^ Rentals & Salai 
CO ROMS, tiook More, 
loattier novelties ar>d toys. 
Ilp.m. 8pm Monday It) ro 
Seiurdiy Must ti^ IB to 
Enter OR LOVES k EX- 
OTIC DANCERS. INC. A 
Bwer BaF, fef'iijlf' (lanttjii 
neoded. Mutt be 21 to en 
tar. Tuaiday thru Satur- 
day Bp m- 1}p m 539- 
0190, linpi'/wwvw.ltan. 
MS . neV^f love* E - mait 
driDves " kaniua net 

EXPERIENCEDWEIGHT 
t tain er tor hire. Make 
gairtsorltxe tail 100% 
'guarantflo end reasonable 

.rate* Catt Winston Yang 
^ot appoint man t, 565-9025 

;FIIEE CASH OKANTSt 

iColleyfl. Scholarstiipfr 
IBusirw&ft Medical bills 
Nevoi repay Toll tree (8001 
218-9000 Eift G1915. 

ILEARNTOFlYtK State 

' Flying Club haa five Air 
< planets, lowest rales Foi in 
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WHLD SmO SEED SALE: 

iOctobur spacial, 50 pounds 
'tMadi all sunflower SI 2 
' 10% oil all bird leedeis and 
>tiundreds to choose from 
;Wlld Bird Companv- 1106 
WntKis nMi to Pets N StufI 

Mfll 



Lost snd Found 



pl»cod f r aa for Ctiroo 
-tftaya. 

BLACK CAT with white 
pawslound ItycHJis, 
iplease call 539-2938 

fOUMD BLACK, Froii Spii 
it tHka To claim call 
778-3476. asJi for Britton 

tOST EYEGLASSES, blue 

wire Irame, bifocals in a 
snap CM49, on or near 
ftouthside of campus. 

JMALE GRAY and wtiiln cat 
lound Appromrnatelv two 
veers old, vary tkinny. pas 
iaible Ivoken leg or hip, has 
bavniiil by acar. Please 
call 778-2035 

OMl 



Wo raifulr* a form ot 
picture ID (KSU driv- 
er'* license or otbor} 
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lllanhatlan City Ordl- 
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portunity in housing 
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SaT-2440. 



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•Aiarm System 

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UNIVERSITY 



APARTMENTS 

2216 COLLEGE AVE 



ONE. TWO. three bed 
room, also studio nine 
month leaaes available. Im 
msdiate possetwon. Clean. 
Quiet, central locations 
most utilities paid. 
537-6389 

SEEKING FEMALE room 
mate to takeover lease m 
January Brand new tor 
nished (our bsdroom 
apertment at University 
Cornmons. Wonderful 
roommates tiut. moving 
into greek housing- Call 
Anrwtte. 639-5573 

SIX MONTH lease, one- 
tiedroom basernent apart- 
ment Newly redecorated. 
washer/ dryer, utilities 
paid. $435/ month. 
539-8877 

UNIVERSITY COM- 
MONS Ron m mates need 
ml Several two bod room 
apart mo nts needm^ a sec 
ond roommate Fully fur 
nis^ed. many student serv 
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Please call 539 Kl 7 1 

110| 

for Ront- 

Apt. 



$296 S310 ONE BEDROOM 
apartments available now 
and Jan. 1 No pels. 587- 
0399 

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walking distance to uni 
versity. £very1hir>g elec- 
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P^ Apartment ^ 
Living At Its Best 

Large 2- Bedrooms 



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Investment 

5J7 9064 ^ 



AVAILABLE ON£. two, 
three, lour tjedrooms. nice 
aiiartmnnts near campus 
With great pricas First 
month fiae 5371666 

CLEAN, ONE BEDROOM, 
no peti, water, trash arwl 
gas paid Call 539-1975- 



I Bedrooms Firsi 
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ipCLtiil * limited 

iiutnlH,rS39 29SI 



NOW LEAStNO. Onn to 

three bi^drooiTi apart- 
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«275 i<j S<>50 Alllenee 
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ONE. rwo. ttirao bod 
room, also studio nine 
month leases available. Im 
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quiet, ceiitral locillons 
most utilities peld 
537-8389 

SICK OF your roommalet? 
Tak« ovar lease on one- 
bedroom apartment two 
blocks from campus on 
Sevalasnth street Call 
776-3804 



2 Bedrooms for 
the Price of I 

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call 539-2951 



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APARTIMENTS Leasing 
tor fell or summer, large 
two and threo bedroom 
apartments with washer, 
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12TH a SLUEMONT. 

Nice three-bedroom 
house FREE washer/ dry- 
«(, front/ badi porches We 
tei' trash paid One tModi 
to CMmpuB. t600 
BS7-M03 Of 1788)263- 
3S1S, leave message 

BRICK HOME, new carpel, 
paint, three or four twd 
roort^s With two bath- 
rooms. Kitchen applii 
patio, enclosed yard, i 
to campus. 639-1177 

FOUR BEDROOM HOUSE, 
916 N 11th street, no pets. 
available first ol January, 
17O0 539-4277 

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TWO THREE BEDROOM, 
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Campus two miles 
537-a3M, 

TWO BEDROOM, ONE 

tMth, westisr' dryer, air 
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utilities 1129 Clef lin 
539-8673 or 17851842-6473 

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roijoirBd. 532-8785: iwee 
kends 532 4941 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed lor apartment next 
scmMler, January July 
Nice er>vironmant and 
Inendiy roommates Janu- 
ary rent is free 566-9439 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to 
share clean, nice tvyo bed 
room epenment Close to 
campus plus Aggieville 
S260 plus orw half utilities. 
Deirdro. 537 1793/532 
6061 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share four-lsed 
room, two bath duptes, 
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Call 539 8494 

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one half bills, lease until 
June t99ei 1303)751-1641 

FIRST MONTH and one- 
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nice apartment Move in 
Imalsweek January. 
539-8977 

NON SMOKING ROOM 
MATE for responsitile 
male Laundry, cable. $140 
plus ui I lilies 539-2466 

ROOMMATE WANTED for 
two t)edroom tiouse. Non- 
srr^oker (220 per month 
Water/trash paid Call 776- 
7823 



AVAILABLE IMME 
DfATELY one bedroom 
apartment $370/ month 



Ckiee to campus I Call 
77» 5135 

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WANTED (o tat* <»i»t 
lease $258' month plus 
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Close to t»mpus. Call 
776-9451 

SU8LEASER NEEDEDi 
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tiedroom house, very close 
to campus Washer ai>d 
dryer 1015 Clallln Call 
Jeastce, 539- 1828 or 539- 
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TIMLOR HOIME bedrootn 

Female, non smoker 
Jaituary May $200 a 
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Rapatr 

AUTOCRAFT 2018 Service 
Circle twhindWalMad- 
Speciali/ing in Nissan Dat- 
sun, Honda. Toyota, Sub- 
aru. Hyundai and Mazda 
537-5049 



Othar 
Sanrleas 



COMPREHENSIVE MAJOR 
Medical Coverage for short 
Of continuous terms Iot 
more information call 



[37% I 

. and 48% more 
tall Pyruvate has 25 years 
clinical testing at a major 
US Medical School. Prov- 
en to lose more weight 
laater end keep it offl All 
ruMurel, sale Call 888^ 839 
8MS 



3B0 



EMPLOYMENT/CAREERS 



3101 



Halp Wantad 



Menhaltan City Ordl- 
ftancs 48 14 asawree 
•very person equal o^ 
IKirtunity in securlr^g 
and holding employ- 
nwnt in viy f iatd ol 
worli or labor for wfikA 
Im/ eha is proparly «|uall- 
ftad r*ganll*»« ol race, 
B*H, milltarv startua, dla- 
abfllty, religion, m^m. 
color, natiortal origin or 
ancestry. Violations 
ehould be roportod to 
Mm INrvctor ol Hurnan 
Beea ureas at City Hall, 
ft37-OOS« 

The Collogtan canrKrI 
i ttw finanelal po- 
Bl of advertlaa- 
mants In tfte Emptoy- 
nwn(/Car«at claealf Ica- 



tdevd to approacft any 
I •mptoymant op- 
nlty with raaaon- 
I oeution TKa Col- 
legian urgas our r«a<l- 



•rs to contact the Bet- 
tor Businass Bureau, 
1K>1 SE Jaff ermon. To- 
paka, K8 6MO7-1190. 
(91312»'44S«. 

$1000 POSSIBLE TYPING 
part-time. At Home. Toil 
Free (1)800 218 9000 Ext. T 
1915 lor Listing 

$1600 WEEKLY potential 
mailing our circulars. No 
Experience Required Free 
tnformetion padiet. Call 
410^783-8272 

$600* WEEKLY $U per 
envelope Send self ed- 
dretsed stamped envel 
ope QMA, PO Box 13486. 
Atlanta. Georgia 30324- E 
maiLGENMAR 
KET 'iraol.com 

ADHHINISniATIVE AS- 
SISTANT: Administrative 
assistant needed for fast 
paced construction office 
in the Manhattan-' Ft Riley 
area starting December 
1997 Must be able to 
worV independently and 
welt with others General 
duties include Typing cor- 
respondence, reports, con 
tracts, etc , Peyroll, InvOM- 
•a. Meinteining check 
book, oenMled oayroii, an 
swering phones, tiling and 
purchasing supplies lor ttie 
office Experience m Mi- 
crrnoft Windows95, Lotus 
123 and AS400S plus Sal 
ary commensurate with ex 
perience. Please send re- 
sume to MA Morten sr3n, 
PO Box 1546. Columbia. 
M0 6520S.Attn Dale Het 
»r- 

ARRANGE YOUR Spring 
semester job now Kaw 
Valley Greenhouse. Inc. ts 
interviewing now to stad 
in Oecemtier. January ot 
February En|oyable work 
atrriosphare. competitive 
pay and opportunity. Call 
776-8585 tietweon 3:00 and 
4:30piTi 

CAN WETALK7 Want a 
part-time ^b that pays lull 
time 7 Want a guaranteod 
hourly wage, plus bonus 
es7 Then call me' M- F, 
Ip-m- 9pm, 567-4 114 ask 
for Sharon. 

COMPUTtH INFORMA 
TION Specialist («304l. Part 
or Full-time, temporafy t)o 
sition. not to exceed 12 
rrHjnths. in the Depanment 
of Agronomy B.S degree 
in compotar science plus 
SIX montfts eeperianca with 
C-^t, Visual SmIc. end 
Windows 3-1/95 Knowl- 
edge of torage manage 
ment end/ or cow c»H pro 
rkiclion systems helptui 
but not required Send let 
ler of application, resuma. 
transcripts, and arrange for 
three letters ot reference to 
be sent to Dr Gerry L 
PlMler. Head, Department 
of Agronomy. Tti rockmw- 
ton Plant Soences Center, 
Kansas State University, 
Manhattan. KS 66506-5501 
Application deadline: 0«- 
lobai 79. 1997 Kansas 
State Uni versify is en Al 
firmative ActiorV equal op 
portunity employer- KSU 
encourages diversity 
among its employees 

fWRT TIME SECRETARY' 
txMkkeeper for local home 
tiuilder Sonre experience 
with computaruad ac- 
counilng pritiraUe. 
539-8640 or 668-4316 

PART TIME WORK for col- 
lege stiidflnis Make your 
uwn schrrdule Earn up to 
S50 $2001 per week Prov 
en resume builder for all 
inaiors Stftolarships, in 
terships, co ops available 
Cor>djtions apply lM>rk rn 
Manlvattan. Interviow at 
personnel oHice in Topeka. 
Call (786)228-1144 M F, 
12 4pm 

SECOND SHIFT Student 
Operator Individual would 
be required to worli one 
nigMe«yeek<M FI4pm 
T2a.m. (this semester it s 
Wednesday nightl, one 
lur^^ shift a weak. (M- F) 
11a.m.- 1pm. (this semes- 
ter it'sTfiursday); and s 
weekend rotation of Sat 
urday lOa.m. 6p m. and 
Sunday noon to midnight 
(with a three hour break I 
one or two weekends a 
month, and workirtg lor 
full-time staff wtfan they're 
sici or on vacation. Start- 
ing salary IS $5 40 per 
hour. Applications and 
compiets job ffoscription 
available from Room 14, 
Hale litxary Applications 
accepted until 5pm . 
10/24/97 For further in 









fl 


Tp^m^ 


U 


fl 


:y 




H 


2lSB^. 


^. 


We"K 

New York &j 

for ALL p 

location it 

iiours ar\d 

yourr 

Manh, 

(913) 45( 


x\eac 

agel Cafe 
oeitions 
1 Manhal 
a iot of 
appllcati 

^19 eiucm 
■ttan, (CS 
5-7192 or 


1" You! 

is now hiring 
for our new 
ttan. Great 
fun! Pick up 
on now! 

out 
66502 

539-2200 



formation, call Gloria Ro 
bedson or Elame Heller at 
532 4941 

TEMPORARY PART TIME 
and weekend help needed 
for furniture delivery 
Please apply in person at 
Homestead Rental, 2332 
Sky-Vue Lena One bkrck 
south of Holiday Inn Holi - 
dome. 

THOROUGH HOUSE clean- 
ing tor couple with no pets, 
smoiiing, children. Flexible 
scttedule Adjacent to cam 
piiS- Respond with letter 
and qualifications to Col 
legian box 1 

irnuTY BILLIMO CO- 
ORDINATOR Cilyol 
Mant>fltlftn. Kftnsas (popu 
lation 44,0001 rs currentley 
seeking to fill a Regular 
Full lime positron ot Utility 
BillingCoordinator Start 
ing Salary $9 21/ hour 
lOOQI, plus excellent ben 
stits This position con 
tributes to the operalion of 
the Customer Service Of 
ficetTy assisting the Cus 
tomer Service Supen^isor 
in the overall coordination 
ol the utility billing opera 
tion. Bachelors degree in 
public administration, busi- 
ness administration, man- 
agement, accounting, or re 
I atad fleW preferred How 
ever, rsleva«tt experience 
may be subitnuted for ed 
ucation Experience in 
PC's and mini -computers 
IS required Experience in 
customer relations is da 
suable Experience rn su- 
pervision IS also desirable. 
A complete job description 
indicating knowledge, skill 
and abilities ts available by 
request. Apply at the De- 
partment of Human Re- 
sources, 100 Men batten 
Town Center. Suite 545. 
Manhattan, KS 66502, no 
later ihanTuesdey. Octob- 
er 78, 1997 by 5 00pm 
EOE M/F'QID 

3301 

Businass 
Opportunltlas 

Ttie Collegian canrtot 
vaHfy th* f inanciel po- 
tential ol advert isa- 
manta In the Emplf^ 
ment/Caraer clasalflea- 
tion. Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business oppor- 
tunity with reasonabl* 
caiftiDn- TiM Cotlagiart 
urges our reade r s to 
contact Ihs BaStar Busi- 
rMsa Surveu. SOI SE 
Jaftaraon.Topaka, KS 
ee«07 1190. 
1913)232-0484. 

EARN MONEY and FREE 
TRIPSii Abs/a lute Best 
SPRING BREAK Packages 
availabIeK INLMVIEXJALS. 
Student ORGANIZATIONS, 
or small GROUF^ want 
edll Call INTER CAMPUS 
PROGRAMS at 1800 
327-6013 or 
httpi//www-cipl-com 




Nama for Sala 



1998 ROYAL PURPLEI 
PurcKaae one today- 
Stop by 103 KwJtia. 
Buy itow lor only 
t34.BS. 

ANTIQUES, COLLECTI 
BLES. tools, books, lumi 
ture, eetale leMrslry, beet 
signs, thousands of curi- 
ous goorls Time Machine 
Antique Maul and Flea 
Market 4910 Skyway Dr 
between Briggs and air- 
port 539-4684 



HAV[ANIDiAFOR 

Halloween? 

GraiKliika's Tnink 

h«« a lot of eloChaa 

mnA odd* and 

to pick f: 



ThrlNBkap 
11*4 Plllaatsair Or. 

H7M7I 



CABLE DE SCR AMBLER kit 
$14 95 See all the premi 
umandpay-per view tftan 
nets 1800)752-1389 

COOK BOOKS, Vintega li 
eensa tegs, encvclopadle'a, 
bladt menwrabllia, <±lurc^ 
windows, oriental lurnitur 
and polery. Vintage maga- 
nnae, txx>ks, religuous. 
hats, radios, clocks, auto, 
tools, cameras, albums, fur- 
niture, iKitery, estate jew- 
elry. Amaricarr heritage 
Ixioks. movie stills, tavern 
ituff, brass, trunks, mili- 
tary, tins, steins, 50 » lurni- 
ture. flute, prints, floor 
lamps, new car trailer 
$1499. new 5x 9 tilt Irailier 
$69S. 8000 Square laet of 
curious gcxids Time Ma- 
china Antique and Flea 
Market 49 10 Skyway Or 
between airport and 



Briggs Visa, MasterCard, 
layaway 539-4684 open 
12:00p-m 5:00pm Tuas 
day thru Saturday. 

K STATE PURPLE or GOLD 
GLITTER- TOO pound 
drums, S75/drum, you 
haul, samples- 785-843- 

IflOS, forcade^compu- 
serve.com. 

SEI-UNG /U.L my oil paint 
ing stuff Some new, sottte 
used Call 776-5999 

WWW. SUPERIOR A 
CURA.COM VIEW our en. 
lire line ol new AND pre- 
owned Acura's. Ask for Pa- 
trldi J. Sterner (1 rated 
Acura web site in tha na- 
tion I 



Pumilura to 
Buy/Sail 

JERRYS WIHOLESAU 

CARFET Carpel rem nam s 
and vinyl remnants 504 
Yuma Monday- Friday, 
eSOa m - 5 sop m Set. 
Be m- 12p.m Opart to Ihe 
(kjUic 

4Mi 



Computars 

MONITOR REPAIR, quit* 
and reliat>le service Free 
pick up artd delivery. Call 
Inland 776-0311 

NEW COMPUTERS Fully 
Loaded Pentium MMX 
233 4gig HO $1499. Penti 
urn MUX 20Q Jgig HD 
11199. Pentium MMX 166 
2gig HD $1099 Computer 
Renaissance 537-4413 



Suppllaa 



BABY UMBRELLAS. Blue 
and gold Macaws, Hahnns 
Macaws, sweet, fun. curtdly 
rare Love Birds. Cockatiies. 
539-1177 



Sporitng 
IgMlptnairt 



GOVERNMENT SUR 
PLUSli Cantoullage cloth 
ing. txxits. rainwear, wcxil 
clothing AlsoCABMARTT 
WORK WEAR Monday 
Friday 9a m.. 5 30p m Sat 
urday 9a. m 5p.m St. 
Marys Surplus Sales, St. 
Marys, Kansas, 1786)437 
2734. 



TIekata to 
Bu»/«atr 



KSUVS KU and KSU VI 
Colorado ticket hwo to 
three tickets. Gerwral ad- 
misiion Sell to highest 
bidder. Cell 539-3639 

LAST TWO ttonte game 
tootbeil ttdrets for sele. 
Call 19131 776-9353 

SELLING FOUR KSU KU 
tuottwil tickets. Taking 
best oiler by October 31- 
Cali 13161492-1521 and 
leave massage with an oft 
ef. Seats are located in the 
north end rone, gertersi ad 



TICKETS WANTED KSil- 
CakMado football game 
Student section or other 
Will Ixiy one or two Call 
nillact (765)131-2031 
tOam Spm or (785)641 
5394 9p m Ida m 

WANTED K STATE vs 
Coloradotidiets Will buy 
any number ol tidtets Call 
collect (913) 829-7350, ask 
(or Mary 



mo 



TRANSPORTATION 



siol 



1979 FORD LTD station- 
wagon, 537-2822 aner 

5p.m Lisa for hunting, 
fishing »nA tailgaie picnics 

1989 JEEP Cherokee, good 
corHlition. SIX cylinder. 
$5600, 539-9239 



1985 MUSTANG GT con 
vertibie customized Too 
many new parts to list 
Must seel $5500 or best 
offei 587-9271 

GOODYEAR MUD arid 
snow tires 17ir)ch. 8000 
miles Asking $550 Call 
Al at 537-2092 

SEIZED CARS from 

S17B. Porsr^hee. Cadillacs. 
Chevys- BMW s. Corvettes 
Also Jeeps, 4WDs Your 
Area Toll Free 1800-2 18- 
9000 Ext. A 1916 tor cur 
rent listings 

TWO SETS OF WHEELS 
FOR SALE 14X6 center 
lines with Forg spinners, 
16X8 polished three star 
American Eaglas- Call 
Brandon, 537 9650, even 
ings 

9201 



Bloycl— 



SPECIALIZED M2 frameset 
plus tree extras Eicpllettt 
condition. $350 or best off 
er Call Al at 537 2097 



Motorcyclas 

13e9NINJA600R Jetted, 
custom pipes, bra. extraS- 
Runs great, $1850 or beat 
offer, 539-8926 

1991 HONDA 750 Night 
hawk Red. Excellent con 
dftion 13,000 miles $2200 
or Ijost offer Call 
539-7685 

1994 KAWASAKI Ninja 
260 Black, purple. 
565 0242 

1995 HONDA CBR 600 F3. 
white/ purple/ yellow, low 
miles, excellent condition. 
$5250 or best offer 
565-9150 

FOR SALE Yamaha 1992 
Seca, red. sharp, $2999 or 
best offer 539 0793 



SB® 



TnAVEL/TRIPS 



619] 

Sfwing 
Braak 



SPRtNO BREAK *SS- Ma 
fatlan with Cuilei^n Toun 
Airfare, seven nights hotel, 
transfers, parties. For 
brotftute or eerning FREE 

Mp i-aoo-as&'tsge 

ltiiMiw.co4leoaKiurs com) 

SMtMO BfUEAM SS* Free 
food and drinks I Cancun. 
Bahamas, Jamaica and 
Florida from S399 Organ 
m a small group and trav 
al Irael Highest commis 
nons and lowesi prices i 
Cell Suif 8i SunTourtIO 
Isecome a carnpus repre- 
sentative (800)574-7577 

"SPRING BREAK "Take 
2-** Hiring Baps' Sell 15 
Take 2 Free Hottest Desti 
nelionsi Free Panies, Eats 
and Drinks. SunSplash 1 
800-4267710 




mwm . 

BftECKBMIw 



ClossifiedRATCS 

I DAY 

20 words or lesi 

J7I5 

•och word over 20 
S.20 per word 

2 DAYS 

20 words Of less 

16 40 

•Qch word over 20 

t.25 per v^rd 

3 DAYS 

20 words or leit 
t9 45 

Bocb word over 20 
t 30 per wofd 

4 DAYS 

20 words or leii 

$1020 

eocK word over 20 

1.35 per word 

SDAYS 

20 wordi or Ini 

il070 

eoch wQfA ovm 20 

t.iO per word 

I consecutive doy rote ) 



HOW TO RAY 

All cloMiheds must be 

paid in advance wiJMi 

you have on oc£ount 

witti Sfutient 

Publicofions Itic 

Cast), cKeck. 

MasterCard or Visa ore 

occepied There is a 

$ 10 leryice charge on 

alt refurned ctiecks 

We reserve ihe right to 

edil, rejecl or properly 

clatsity any od 



FREE FOUND ADS 

As a service lo you, we 

run bund ods for three 

days free of charge 



CORREOIONS 

ll.yoij lind an eiior in 

yout od, ptecse coll us. 

Ad ocoipl responsibili- 

ly only lor lh« lirti 

wroog insertion. 



OMCEUATIONS 

It you tall your iDeni 

bsbre your od hm 

expired, we will refund 

you (or ihe remoining 

doys Vou must call ui 

before noon the doy 

before the od is to be 

published 



HEAOUNES 

f Of on exira chorge, 

we'll put a fteodtine 

obowe your od to colch 

the teoder'i otlenlion. 



000 



BULLETIN BOARD 



HOUSIHIj/nEAL ESTATE 




HHTheKoaA 




Find the blka you've 
OBMi SBBTChlng for. 
From Roadsters to 
Mountain Bikes, we 
|uet might have 
your ticket to 
freodom. So read 
and rMe. It*s that 
simplBa 



Kansas State Coi.lk(;ian 

103 Kedsle 532-65M 




TnANSPORTATIOM 




ro nACE AN AD 

Go to Kediie 1 03 
(ixroi) hom ifte K -Stats 
Stijdent Unionl Ofliix 

houri ort Monday 
through Fridoy from 6 

am lo 5 pm The 

office is op8ft exctpi 

on fioltdoys 



\ 



u 



KANSAS STATE COUIGIAN 



T 



FRIDAY, OCTOttR 34, 1997 



WHot ttlttt hapfMnvd 
in Stud«nt Senate? 

Ml 97/91/U NkSSID 504. Thu bll 

odbtd o iMentlxxiy pletttciW qutilion to 
th« tlodium eipaniion tef«[«ndum ballot on 
Novtmb«i 1 7 and 1 8 Ths qiwttion astti 
mMw tludenh pr«^ KSlo)c i Iroditionol 
Ittitf^roding tyiKni. o plui sytNoi or a 

■lU 97/91/41 nUSfO S4-0. Th.i bill 

CItOlKf r«Miv« account to tovs urplu) 
ocodtrnk compililion t»omt Ivnds bt 
fytyft utc 

MI 97/9l/» PASS! D S44i Thii b>ll 
ollocotsd 1 1 .590 [the full omount rwjutit 
ecf| la ^unMi CdM ci>mp«<ilion tsgins fo) 
Hicolyfat 1998 

UU 97/98/39 PASSID S44. Ifi^s bill 
slWoted S,950 |the Kill anvouni i«quetl«d) 
to lh» Spwcli UnlifnitMJ compeltlion iwrn 
lor liKolycof 1998 



Itl 97/91/U MBW S44. TKo y 

moffd unipent Igfid* from it* FOMf Cfiiii 
Ztnfw, DiioWed Shidervt Sir»icei ond 
Wxntn'i ReKuccc Ctnht boct to ih« 
SKidtnt Gowning Auociotton (tnwvn br 
Conting«nci«] Accoiinl A total of t4l 44 
woi tronsletred 

NU 97/9S/19 nU»D $4-0. Thit bill 
rmwd W)t« qiiolifiMliont Iw general eW- 
ttoni and claiili<d curreni election co(ies 
Stiidenti enrolled m ol least me credit houf 
□I the tnam compuv of K Stole ore now eligi 
We lo vole in elections 

IIU 97/91/34 MSStD 54-0. Tins bill 
moved wipeni htndi from vgrnus college 
councill boci to tfie Sludenl Governing 
AuociolKin Reserve) tor Contingefvtiej 
Account A tod ol 1 1 2. 1 29 33 wai tront- 
iMted 



Stadium 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

delcrmmt whtTC u pnssibk- k\' 
Wiiulil he H'l 

*'I vviiulJ liitpc thill it the Mttv 
coiiK's Kick ,iihI ihc iD.ijtiiily ol nIU- 
tlents \t>ivd Itir otii' upiion, ihai ytm 
wtitiltl lukt' itiL* hill iltiit Vii p\c til 
yuii (nut of I'rtvilcyc Kcc 
rummillcc) aiul vote il in hy iiniini- 
mitus iiiiiH'm I hilt ttill he what tin- 
viuttcnis twic Huid thut Ihi'v wimt," 
Oiti) Mild. 

Afler (Ichute ;iiul mv .iincnd- 
rnvnK. thi' ruuil hill itrntitiiieil 
niinKTiHis tlillcrcin.es Irnin the otit;- 
timl tlui vsj.>i iiitrodiieetl hy Privilege 
lee torn mi I lee Cttie key amcnd- 
mcni e\pjin(]etl the Icntilli ol' tlte 
ekvtuHi Irnni tme diiy Ui two 

Ciovcrnincnial RcliUinns 

Cominilla' t hiiir I'.tlnek ( ariicy, 
whiv proposed the .itriemtmciil. s.iid 
1 1 Mill liel|> gtilhcr even itHirc stuileiit 
opiniim 

"W;'ve Inlkcil a ^ki\\ deal .ihout 
waniint! to get as many stmlciits 
involvcil as absolutely possible 
Wc re tulkm^ aKnit a gi^id tieal ol 
morK'v comint; oul of the pockels of 
simlcnis every year I helieve we 
sitould ofl'er the stiitlerits ol this uni- 
versity more ol an opporhiniiy ilian 
liisi a liiesilay li> eonie m and regis- 
ler I he It vole." tarncy said 

Other aincmlineitl'. ehainied ihc 
word 111^ III I he hill lo make ilic ques- 
tion .md how Siiiilciil Scnale will 
deal with lite cleetioii results 
more speeil'ie 

(iradiiaie Scnalor I hris Nvila's 
cliun){e added a ehiiise thai eonsidcrs 
the rcfcrcmliim tailed il it does nol 
fctcivc WIpiTccHi olilie vote In Ills 
debate. i\\ ila viid olher relca'iuluiii 
voles, sueh (IS ilie (inion e\p.insiiin. 
have received less than tlie nujtirity 
hut v^cre approved hy Senate, never- 
theless 

,Av ila said the yoal ol' his rel'eren- 
dum was lo keep ihal Iroin happen- 
ing! apim 

"I've been here lonj; enouiih lo 
aee a rvrerendmn pass hv 5'> 3 per- 



cent and si it I hs' called a maiority 
opinion Now we have a I'nion pro- 
jccl," Avila said ' I his makes sure 
ihai a majiiniy is needed " 

I )nly one ol the st\ proposed 
amendments tailed Arts and 
Sciences Senator (irej: t'lciiver 
ohjecled to the wording; hecaiisc 
under the ori(;inal hill suidenis who 
voted aitaiiisi ilie lelereiidum were 
nol allowed to clnMse which privi- 
lege Ice I hey would preler il'a tec is 
created 

(leaver laid he disai^reed wilh 
calling itie i|uesiuiii's restdis ollieial 
student opinion w nhoiit allow in^: all 
students Itl V oic ttn tt 

"When ilia I pichisciie comes 
helore this bmly. that pichiscile will 
have faulty iittoiinaiuiii in it I hat 
plehiscite will illustrate the tilVicial 
opinion ot ihe siutleiit hinly when 
nol all students have been allowed to 
vole." (leaver sjid 

later, I acuity Represenialivc lo 
Senate flill Mull aniciidcd ilic bill iti 
iiitliidc ilk- wind "i|iieslion" uiste.id 
ot ■plebiseile" Ihe change passed 
h> unaniiiuiiis consent 

He lore the hill was passed. 
'X^triculture Senaiof Aatoii Iruas 
debated ayaiiM it. s;ivm;: the voice 
ol the minority >hiinld be heard 
bcliire a (nisnivc vote tor a ptivile(;e 
tee lorees all \iutlcnts tti pay Iruax 
i!i a niemhct ot l'iivile}ic lee 
I'omitiiitee. which aiiihoicd the hill 

"Right now. I tlon'i think iliai wc 
should make it niantlalorv that ev ci v 
siudcni tin ihi-. cantpui pav tnt a tec 
thai IS a want td ccrlain |vople i>n 
this campus iD.illtit at iikisI I 
don't in any way want to viop siinienl 
opinion, but I will stand up loi lho>e 
who cannot sUnil up lor Ihem- 
sckcs." he siiid 

Iruax said senalois stiould listen 
10 tlic voices ol all students who will 
p.iy the Ice not jusi ItKHball tans 

■■( onirary to popular beliet. ii 
tiiK'sn't go (hhL Siivtier. V^clald 
Clinton II goes (intl lasp.ivetv. 
Snyder. WVIaki ( linitin I he tavi^iy - 
ers are we. I he sludenls. who will he 
paving the lee it it passes ihe relei- 
enduni." he said. 




Go ploy on the World Wide Web. 
The eCollegian has a crossword, a 
Campus Cam and comic strips. 
collegian.ksu.edu 



Stocks 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

moil 

I IS Treasury bondii tind hillii. the 
most liquid and secure ol' invcMntent.s, 
were sn.i|ipe»l up by glohal tnvcslors 
looking lor a haven (or the mot\cy 
yanked oul or sliH;ks 

Yields »in the .11 1- year US Treasury 
bond, .11) imptirtant indiculor of the cost 
ol Kunming, plunged to li .W percent 
by late 1 hursilay Irniil b 42 perecni lute 
ttediiesdav 

I he rtnii in I long Kong occurred 
alter the government, in a move to sup- 
pjirl Its currency. K'gan aggressively 
selling I'.S dollars ami buying I long 



Kong dollars It also cut olV a cheap 
source of credit lor hanks 

Interest rales soared The interest on 
twemight Itxins hciween hanks shot up 
lo .MID pcrceni troni 7 percent 
Wednesday, sparking Icurs that hanks 
will raise their prime lending rales today, 
undermining I hmg Kong businesses and 
Ihe real estate market 

Ihe defense of the Hong Kong tUtllat 
was a rude surprin' lo currency and 
stwk traders, who hati speeidated that 
the governmeni, under pressure from 
I long Ktsng maiuifaciurers to slay com- 
pel it ive. w I HI Id instead devalue the cur- 
rency hy lehing n Ireelv irailc as oihei 
.Asian governments have recently done 

I long Kong slocks were als*» battered 
as several high-profile invcsinieni liimls. 



reacting to lowered grtwth expecluiuinti 
Tor Ihe Asian ecinn>my. indiscrintmately 
dumped Asian stocks Thailand. 
Malaysiu. Indonesia and the Philippines 
have been under econitmie stress hir 
months and have recently devalued their 
currencies 

Speculators have been selling the 
curreneieti of those couniries since 
July 

On Thurstlay. ihe stt>ek selling was 
inosi prominent in the shares ot interim- 
lional companies thai rely heavily on 
sales m Asia 

Among issues iimler proMire m Ihe 
(initcd Slates were teclinology compa- 
nies lhal have h>oked lo Asia's economic 
growth lor iK'w sales and airlines that 
depend on tfalfu to Asia 



Loans 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

cally In highci than in other areas, fhe 
average student dcht in Mussaehusclt^ is 
S:tMKMt 

Mtisl of Ihe students surveved said 
they had ineonws of S2(MKH) lo'Wt.lNHl 
a year 

" I he siudeiits w liti .ire Iturt the niitsi are 
those who went to higher-ctw institutions 
.ind studied tic Ms ihai luiven'i given Ihcnt 



the kinds nf wages ihey need," l>iane 
Saunders, Nellie Mae's vice pieMttcni td 
public ajfairs said ",\nd these pressures 
are atlvxting the way ihey make olher deci- 
sions ahtviii iheir careers aiul their lives," 
she said 

An increasing number of students arc 
pulling olTsucb things as buy ing a car or 
a house, or moving out of their parents' 
house, the study ftiund Some graduates 
are working tnitsidc then liekls lo make 
enough money to pay ol1 iheir dchts 

liridgel McllonaidL 24, graduated 



from Koslon t'ollegc m I W5 vMih a 
tiegree ni clemcniary educaliofl. .mil 
about S2<t.lHHl in studeni loans 

Stie told the (ilobe she can't find an 
education job thai would pay 
enough tor her to pav her hills, ineliiding 
S2K5 a mimth in loans She wtvrks as .in 
adinimstralive assisi.int at an insurance 
company and wonders whether slic can 
all'ord to go 1(1 graduate school 

"Ini niU in the career I want to be in, 
and that's the biggc-t cHect my lo,ins 
h.ivc tin me rtglii now." vlic said 



Crash 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 
iiialion 

Ihe collisitin comes weeks after 
Defense Secretary William Cohen 
ordered all br.mches of the military to 
have a 24-luiui satety st.md-dtivv n and 
rev lew their training priKcdurcs alter a 
rash tif an crashes 

I he series of air crishes started Sept 



Prennancv 

resting C'tntiT 

5.V)-3338 

•f ixv pregnancy 

lostiiig 
• loUillv contklcntuil 

sen ice 

■Siinictliiv results 
'( mII 1(11 iip[XMntnicnt 

I iiciIc'iLktiiss (ruiii c.impiis 
m \niicrs(in Vill.iLic 



PIZZA 

SHUHLE 

deliver: 

776^77 

ViSOOCIaflinRoadJ 



!tT1i« man who govs Phil Qromm o run fpr his mon«y:]' 



VICTOR MORALtS 

will b« sp«Qking 

Fri.. Oct. 24 «t 3:30 p^M. 
in Forum HoU 



( Spontorvd by Hlsponlt flmcrlcon Lsadsrshlp Organliatlon ) . 
. ( Co-Sponior«<l by KSU Young DvmcKratt ) . 

( Plvastt Join th« Toung D«mo<rats for a j - 
( r«c«ption honoring Victor Morales at 
(4:30 p.m. in tha Fiinthiils Room. KSU Union > 



The women of Gamma Phi 
Beta would like to thank the 

men of Delta Tau Delta Sl 

Sigma Phi Epsilon for a fun & 

rewarding homecoming week. 

We had a great time! 



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\\ when an Air loree (-141 ttans|HiTl 
plane crashed otV the coast tif Mriia 
alicr app.irently colliding with antitlici 
aircraft I he next day. an I - 1 1 7,\ stealth 
lightet hroltc up m Hight al mi an show 
III M.iryland 

I he day after that, a Navy 1-1 K went 
down in { )man and a Marine ( orps I- 1 N 
crashed otT North ( arolina Ivvti planes 
Ironi llie New Jersey Alt National (iuard 
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■ n 16 More •537-0886 •MorvSal. It a.m.- 1 B.ni.«Sun, 11 am. • MklnIgM ■ 



IHOLA! Conference 

October 24, IW7 
-Keytiotc Spc;ikcr- 

Victor Morales 




"C<inMru\vtni(i niii\tri> futnro " 

k-Slatv Lniun 

y.M) p m l-ree AdiniNsion 

rnllowed by: 4:.Ul rccepli<ut-l lint Mills rtH>m 

Teliae Demacratic Mominve 
Phil (ii'ahHiu\ opponent 

"The other side of the Story " 




J 



-TS^ -.* «- ? y « 



^ V ^ *- # 



CCXlfQUN 

DIRECTORY 



c 



V^' 



,1 W <i \">M 

532-6556 
S32h6S60 
532^555 







TATE 



Manhaoan, KS 66506 




\N 



Vot )02No 45 



SICK OF SMOKERS BLOCKING 
ENTRANCES TO RESTAURANTS? 



^ Mary R*n*« Smith laiki about hei itnlation with 
smokeri who lomelimei put a damper on her 
evenings 

See OPtKK>N, Page 4 



rN 






K-STATE'S 26-7 WW OVK OKiAHOMA 
MOVES THEM UP TO NO. 1 3 W ROUS 

^ K-Slate'i deFenie not only tacked all three 
qua Fief bock I I he Soonefi ihfew ot ihem, but olio 
moved up o tpol in the rarvkingi 



Anderson expansion meeting announced 



^ b M a good thingT 

A public 

informational mset 
ing about the 
Anderion Avenue 
ExpotTiion Proiecl 
will be at 6 pm 
Nov 13 in Union 

-^m 



UHIMUN YOOf R 

^^nifm^ ^4 nt- run If 111 L'ttitiM 

The (i0vcrnycnl;il Rclatiims C'uiiidiiiil'i.' 
Ublcd It rcsitlulioit supporting ihi' L'\ptiiiMon i)t 
AndiTM»n Avenue Sunday. 

The deeision vtii> muJi; lol lowing the 
announcement of a I'ltunh Inrortnatiottal meetinj* 
seheduled for d pm Nov. 1 1 in I Inum 2 1 2 J;u k 
Mc<>M:r. Miinhall;in eit> engineer. siiiJ the nieeimi; 
is intended to mlorm K- State students and 
Manhjllaii resident-, aboui the e\pansnii», a S''- 
inilliiMi proji'ei sehedulcd to beym in early I ''''') 

lltwevtT. Mcsser said t1 wa> too late m lite 
planning process lo signilkanlly ehanjie the 
plans He said Xit pereeni id the plans are eom- 
pk'lcd and Ivavc heen sent to tite Kansas 
IK'parlnient of Transporiaiiiiii Ihe plaits will be 
^5 percent complete by IX*tcniK.T. and the bid- 



ding prtH'ess will begin siMtn uRer. 

"At this point in the projeel. wc arc about nine 
inonlhs JDlo the pn^ject." Messer said 

I'riiir to the announiCineiil. Messer and Dave 
Maehirlanil assivtale professor ol' journalism 
and iiieitiHer of Anderson Hidenmg Area 
Residents' Irklavc, a witi/ens' awareness group 
against the prii(eet, presented their dttTenng opm- 
ions ol the e spans ton 

Three public meetings to inlortn the public 
about the expansion have (Keiirred sinee the 
hegmning of the year, and Messer sjid the two 
most impoitant issues e\prusscd during meetings 
were vchieului s;ireiy and relieving tratltc tongcs- 
tion 

**VV'e have attempted to be up tront wnh people 
that this was going io be a projcei of great magni- 
tude." Mi^sscT said 



The project will widen Anderson .Avenue Itotn 
Iftih Street to Sunset -Avenue A lel1-lurii lane will 
stretch the length ol the projcx'l and a northbound 
right- turning lane will be added to .Anderson 
Avenue at IX'nison Avenue One-hundred eighty 
trees will also be removed because of construc- 
tion. 

The v^'idening will allow tralTic to move more 
sniiM*thly because stop lights will be computer 
timed Messer said I le said it would create a "pla- 
toon system" designed to allow groups of autiv 
mobiles to gel green lights. 

If pedestrians want to cross the street, Messer 
said crosswalk buttons kKated at mosi intersec- 
tions would change IralTic lights, hut only if a 
"plaiiHUi" was not approaching the intersection 

See ANDfRSON, Page 10 



yictor Morales, the first Hispanic from Texas to win a prominent party nomination 
for Senate elections, spoke Friday for Hispanic Heritage Month and discussed his recent 

announcement to run for the House of Representatives. 

MAKING HIS POINT 

SrORY BY SAHA MASriN • PHOTOS BY Ctif PAIMBERG 




VICTOR MORALES deliveri the keynote oddieis fof Hopomc Heologe Month FVidoy afternoon m Forum Holl Moroles fori 
agoiiit Phil Gromm (of US Senole m 1996 m Te«Qi 



Victor Morales sitid he was tireil 
i>l sitting back and allow nig had 
politicians to propose the 
wrong stdiilions to problems 
they didn't care about So. ihis 
Dcmocratu high schmil gov- 
ernment teacher ran against I'hil lir.inim in titc 
l*W<t Senate race He was I be lirsl Hispanic to 
w in a major parry nomination in levas 

\torales delivered the keynote address for 
Hispanic Heritage Month tridav He discussed 
his reevni announcement to resign fiuin leach- 
intj lo run loi llie House ol Keprescnialivcs and 
his motivations lor his prev unis Lampaign 

"I thought to myself I don't know how 
much impact I'm going lo have, but I've go! to 
iry." he said 

His wife was hesi- 
tant at first, he siiid 
However, her laith m 
him was strong Slic 
supported his decision 
although his absence 
from leaching cost hi^ 
familv S4II.IKMI and 
then lili: sav ings 

Morales refused to 
.iccept Political Action 
( oniiniitee money I le 
canipaigned m his 
white pickup truck and 
traveled SIMMHI miles 
through le\as, meeting 
people ami relying on personal dima lions 

"Ihere were always people along the way 
earing lor mc," he said "Hi ere were people 
there for me constanlty. giving mc dinnet or a 
place to stay I figure if you don't have liiends. 
make some" 

Ihe media often accused Morales of lading 
to lake a stand on issues, he said Morales, a 
staunch supporter of Head Start programs, edn- 
caiion, IVIt grams, fkclier border paiiol and 
being liH'ally soiauL siiul his grass.ioois cam- 
paign style allowed people to relate better lo 
him ihun ( iramm. 

"1 remember this man once, who, alter talk- 
ing to me said 'Victor. I'm a Republican, but 
I'm going to vole for you because I believe in 
what you're doing.'" Morales sjiid "IVople 
knew that 1 was telling the truth and that I don't 
have lo dance for anyone, no matter what was 
:«aid about me " 

liee IMPACT, Poc)e 10 



— bw 

I ikoggKl k) iny«ll, 1 
don t linow liow niych 
impoct I'm going to 
hme, but fwe gol to 

• Victor Morolet 

keynote ipeoliei 



•>•,■ 



See SPORTS, Page 6 



Ocio«i27, 1997 
MONDAY 




HIGH 48 

10 W 21 

Wa<mftf and woitlv 
vunny with i) '.oulh 
w»t wi'icf ol 1015 
mph IwiiflK' t.o'J} 

Fo«f •■*'|T rAr.( 'i 



Blizzard hits 
plain states first 



AstociATto mss 

DINVTR Stranded 

motorists, single-dign tempera- 
tures and (i-l'tHit snow drills were 
Icll behind Sundav as the sea- 
sort's first blizzard passed 
through, shutting down much of 
the weslern Plains. 

1 he Slate I'atrol barred non- 
emergency travel along some 
.11)11 miles ol the front Range. 
Irom Wyoming lo New Mexico 
A 125-niile stretch ol Inierslale 
Kit in Nebraska was eluded akmg 



with roads in VVvoining. Kansis 
and New Mcmco 

Ihe snow finally tapered ofT 
Saturday night It was the worst 
snowstorm in Denver in 2K years, 
with 12 inches bv Saturday 
evening surpassing the lt< inches 
leeorded in Wii-i 

"I tirtiiiuiely I don't know of 
any deaths," said (tov R«ty 
Ronicr. who ordered the National 
(luard lo rescue stranded 
motorists "Hut we have mir 

Sef BUZZARD, Page 10 



Math department 
faces staff shortage 



Kiniou 

^1 III i^'fx.rM 

V shortage of tucully mem- 
bers could become a serious 
problem loi the malh dcparimcoi 
nest vear if a hiring freeze is iuh 
1 1 tied* 

1 he nialh dcpiirtmeni has sus- 
tained the death ol one tacnitv 
member, .ind two faculty mem- 
bers are taking a leave ol 
absence 

"Right now we have a couple 
ol Misltuclots iHi leave to do 
researeli, " Andrew Hen net I. .isstt- 
ciaie protessor ol mathematycs. 
said 

Henncit said thai having lac- 
ulty members lake a leave ol 
absence to do research is part ol 
luving :i succcsslul inalh pro- 



gram 

" I lie real shortage w ill Iv tell 
ncM year," D.ivid \cller, assuci* 
ale prolcssor of mathematics, 
said ■ Ihcie's a possibihtv thai 
we could be' short about live lo 
eight lacuhv ineinK'rs " 

>eiiei s,iid the sbortage could 
hi' .itliihiilcd to .1 lew laciilly 
memlKTs ihai tmght be taking a 
s.ibbatical or leave ol absence 
nevt vc.u lie also s,iid that some 
lacullv members iiiighi Ik took- 
ing at other uuiversiltes Km |H»si- 
tioiis 

He said when faculty mem- 
bers ;!o Oil a sabbatical or a leave 
of absence Ihcv are paid hall ol 
then regular salary or not paid at 

See MATH, Poge 10 



Counselin 
celebrates 

KRItTM lOTD 

During a time when World 
War 11 veterans were reluming to 
college. k-Stale's (.ounseling 
Serv ices were there tti help assist 
I hem. 

Umiversiiy ( ounselmg 
Services has been assisting stu- 
dents since I'Md I his pas I yeai 
marked Sll yeais ol s^tvicc thai 
the ( ounselmg Services has pro- 
vided lor students 

In Ihe piist, the I ounselmg 
Services locitscd on issues such 
as teaching siudenis siudv skills 
and helping students chiHise a 
major 

loday. I lie ( oonseling 
Services help students ctiiic wnh 
stress and anviety. siiiialional 
problems, lamily issues, depres- 
sion and othei cominun problems 
that lace college students 

"We h.ive a lull-ningc eoun- 
seling service We deal wiih any- 
thing from personal issues lo 
relationships." hied Newton, 
director ol ihe Counseling 
Services, said 

In recent veais. the 



g Services 
50 years 

I ounselmg Services has l>een 
Using ,1 device known has 
bioleedback I his is the conipui- 
eri/ed nioniiormg ol body 
res|Vnises 

It allows students lo become 
aware of changes m his or her 
phvsioh^ical and emotional lev- 
els ol atousal 

\ewioii said things have 
changed a lot Ironi Ihe past with 
more icchnohigv like computers 
and hioleedback atouiid 

In a survey conducted by 
t ounselmg Services. .^7 percent 
lo 411 perceni ol ihe seniors sur- 
veyed had used the I ounselmg 
Services soineiime or anoihet in 
iheii lout vears at K-State 

Sew Ion said students who 
iisuallv liavc giHKl grades have 
Used then serv ices 

"We have h.id trouble gelling 
lite average siudcnis who are |ust 
getting In li> lake avi vantage ol 
our services.' New ion said 

"I have never had lo use the 
Counseling Serv ices, but it in 
nice to know ihai \\ is there if I 
ever need it." ,\li D.iv is. junior in 
landscape archtlccturc. said 



16 volunteer groups 'Make a Difference' city wide despite dreary weekend weather 



JAMiS UNMAN, 

(unioi <n biology, 

teofi down a 

domoged fence tn 

the Foir mount oreo 

of Manhattan qi 

part of Moke A 

Difference Ooy 

Lehman it o 

member of Alpha 

Phi Omega, 

national tervice 

fraternity, whote 

project wo I to 

clean up ihe 

FairmounI ateo 



CdMagtoA 




MMIMUON 

.t*fl irf.i)fk-J 

Saturday's inclement weather did not 
din'ouragc the IIKI volunteers working 
for "Make A Di (Terence Day" in 
Manhattan 

Sixteen volunteer groups were sched- 
uled ut complete projects, which includ- 
ed planting trees around schiKils, tearing 
down fences and buildings, picking up 
trash and working at Sunset /(ki log teal 
I'ark Some projcet.s VM;a' poslptined due 
to ram 

"I was burpri»ed to <icc such a crowd 
(tn such a dark and dreary day," Mike 
Kcarns, one of the event ct»irdinulorH, 
said. 

Thiit IS the nm year that Matthattin 
has pnnicipaiecl in the nationwide event, 
which IS sp<msored by the I'omts of 
light foundation and the USA WIFK- 



i'.ND maga/me 

l.iwally. >o»ith as Resources and ilte 
Regional Prevention (enter of Northeast 
Kansas tirgam/ed ihe event Youth As 
Kesourecs is a nonprofit organization 
that funds civic projects fm volunleets 
ages K to 2 1 

The day's projects are entered in the 
national competition II the Manhattan 
protect Is chosen as a national honoree, 
ii could receive some charitable awards 

"Uy (»unicipaiing today, wc become 
eligible lo receive S^.IXKt thai we can 
donate to a charily of inir choice," said 
Jennifer Unruh. event ciwrdinaior from 
the Regional Prevention C enter 

"It's really mtpirmg to sec you all 
come out imlay This is one of the 
nation's largest days of caring," she said 

To kick olT the event, voliintceni mel 
at Uramlagc Coliiieum The K-Staie 



women's baskeihall team ti»ok time om 
ol praciiee to show its supp*in ol the 
event 

"I'm one ol those people that really 
believes one person can make a dilTcr- 
ence," t ouch l>eb Patterson s.iid "When 
we gel this manv people logelher. think 
of all the ditVerence wv can make 

"It real I V dov's make a dillerence 
whelhet you're planitng trees or picking 
up trash (el's pist all bind togethc't. help 
each other," she said 

To help w lib the event, ihe wotnen's 
basketfiall team tinik refreshments to the 
volunteer sites throughotit the diiy 

The day attracted a v.mety of volun- 
teetK college students, children, parenis 
and conmrtmity members 

Kcarns works «iih the Vuulh As 

See DIFFIKfNCE, Page 10 



mamm 



Xdi^ 



DEADLINES 

TO HACe AN ITIM 

in the Doily Pbnrter, 

itop by Kadiia 1 1 6 

and fill out a form 

o« •'mail It ki 

coHagnOkwtdu 

by I 1 o.m. Iwodoyi 

Morm it it to run 




KANSAS STATE COLIEGI A N 



MANAOt^ (DITOI 

jtinoiv 




MONDAY 



OCTOBER 27, 1997 



NEWSrewind ^ . ^ 

wtn umrf j*piff feporti 



'Cop-o-Buzz' demonstration ends 
after participant is hospitalized 

AKRON. OKio - The 'Cop<^6uM' demon jlralion 
on ihc dongeri ol drinking hot been icrapped ol thi 
Univeriily of Alton a flat student volunteet wai hoi 
piiolized lor drinliing k)0 much vodka 

Univerxly oKicioli Mid Fndoy (hot they will find 
ano'ber way to obierve Akohol Aworenett \A^k 

David Reynolds, 24, a civil engineertng iTva|or, wai 
ficspitahzed \A^n»doy nighl alter drinking w much 
vodka (fiat he became falling-dowfi drunk He wot 
rebated the next day 

Reynoldl arid two olfier itudenl vdunleers were 
uppoied lo drink jutt enough lo hit a blood otcohol 
bvvl of 08 percent . ilighlly below the !0 percent 
limit for drtvtng in Ohio, and then perform a tobfiet^ 
leit. 

The demonjtrolion was intended to show how even 
small omounti of olcohoi ton hamper motor ikilli By 
the lime police arrived, Reynoldt was slumped ond 
having trouble walking 

No one wos able Id soy how much Reynotds drank 
Police didn'l check hi; bloodalcohol level before he 
went lo the hospital 

'II was never the intention of the program to gel 
anyorie drunk," soid Dovid Stephen, university director 
of residence life and housing 

Borkley arrested after bar scuffle 

ORLANDO, Flo - Charles Borkley was orreiled 
early Sundoy lor hurltrvg a bar patron through a win 
dow after ifie mon lossed o glass of ice ot hiin 

Poke said ihe Houston Rockets tlor loM the victim 
OS he lay bleeding on ihe ground 'You got what you 
deserve You don I respect rne I hope you're hurt " 

The 20 year old patron. }oige Lugo, was treated al 
a hospiKil lor a minor lacerolion to his upper nghl arm 

Borklty was charged with oggrovaied battery and 
lesisling orresl without violence, police said He wos 
(Uiled lor five hours before being releosed on $6,000 
bond 

Berkley roW police ihor tugo threw o gloss of tee al 
him and three women who were silting oi his table 
Buikley chased Lugo lo live from of the bar. where an 
oHduty officer tried to inlerver>e Bui Berkley picked up 
Lugo and threw him through the wirvdow 

Borkley, who was in town lor an eKhtbition game 



ogoinjl ihe Orlando Mogic, was not oil practice 
Sunday morning but wot expected to ploy Sunday 
nighl 

Rockets spokesmon Tim frank laid team officials 
would discuss ih« light with Borkley before deciding 
what to do 

Men charged with turtle trading 

TOPEKA - Psssli Hey, buddy, wonna buy a slight 
ly used turtle? 

Don't lough There's big money m the illicit turtle 
trade, and Kansos' official stole reptile, the ornate box 
turlW. IS nghl m the middle oi it 

On Friday ledeial prosecutors announced ihot two 
men hod been indicted on chorges of buying and sell 
ing more than 1 ,000 ol the small, colorful reptiles 

Doniel Newton, 4 J, of Elk City, Kon . waschorged 
with two counts ol transporting and selling B37 bo> tur 
lies in inle'sloie commerce Terry Luke Stevens, 42, of 
Thibodaun, lo , n charged with three counts of receiv 
ing, ocquiring and purchasing numerous snakes and 
1 75 tiox lurites thai hod been caught in Kansas 

Box turtles, iheir dark shells marked by yellow ond 
oronge-yeHow lines, ore no big deol in Konsas. where 
they're often seen munching on bockyord gordens or 
trying lo cross busy highways Bui ihey can fetch up to 
$300 eoch in Europe or Japan, a reptile expert said 

Police: Alleged drug dealer sent 
marijuano to laundry by mistoke 

VERO BEACH, Flo - A mori|uono dealer who 
police soid look ihe wrong bog to the laundry was 
arrested after a worker found 3 pounds of morijuona 
instead of clothing inside 

Police said ihey seiied SO pol plonts and discov- 
ered on eioboiote indoor growing operation at the 
home of David Snyder, who was arrested Friday on 
drug chorges 

Snyder, 37. is charged with cultivolion of mari(uo- 
na, possession of more ihon 20 grams of mari|uana, 
possession of drug poropheinolia and possession of 
mari|uona with ihe inleni to sell He was beir>g held al 
tfie county pi Saturday evening on tl 2,000 bond 

When they seorched Snyder's house, detectives 
found about tBO.OOO worth of pfonls ond mote ihon 6 
pounds ol morijuana lucked owoy in dresser draw«ri 
ond garbage bogs, police said 



DAILYplanner 

Jht Doity Manlier ii the CoJItgio'i'i compui bullriin booid )m 
VIC* htmi in iti* plamw con ht pubfilM tip to rtiiM hmti 
Itomi may nol apptor btcovf ol spoce conurwnrs bvf Or* 
guatonlttd lo appear on ihe day ol tte ocrhnly h place on 
ittm, ikf) by Ked^w 1 16 ond hi our a htm or *tnoil i' ib 
collcgnMsu fdu by M o m ti«a days befcrt it ii la n^ 



• TIm O w duOte UhM» hot ichMJvM the hnol oral 
defenie o^ itw docloitsi' disserralion ot Kathnne Millei lor 
9 3D a m toboy in Stiellenb*(g«( 704$ 

• MortBT iMfd wilt owoid rwo t;00 Kholorihips lo 
luniori ihit Ml AppticoHoris. now ovaibblt in the Ofhci 
of Studenl Aclrviliei and Servicvi on lh« ground Hoor of 
the K Slole Stxideni Union, oi* due t>y 5 p m today 

• Na*l¥« Amartcon Student 9u4f wiH m«ei frum 6-8 

toflighl in Union 203 

• Al^tso Nii Owieaa wiU' met* at 6 )0 lonigtil in the 
tecond-Roor lobby of the Union lor group pictures 

• lMI*flfM*ler* in iutiit«*t wilt ineer gl 6 30 lonigtil m 
Coi»in 306 

• %9tk»f •( ^BhiilBiiat JoumoKih wJI nwit oi 

b 30 ton^ht 11^ Kedf « 1 05 

• C olle g e lepuUkMit will meet at 7 tonighi in Union 
207 

• tiemefsh eif fonlaty wilt meet al 7 lonighr in the 

lecond Hooi lot>by ol ttte l>iion 

• Hntntm OlA viH mee* ot 7 lonighl in Union 212 

t KSU ShidMita br Mi« Hghlto Uh will meet oi 7 
ronighf in Union 206 

• Phi Upiiksn OmitPM will neel at 7 tonighi in Justin 

ISO 

• Ad Cklb will meti ol 7 30 Imight in Kedile lOS 

• Ttt* Apeelolh Campm MMilry w.U m«ei oi a 

lonigKi in ihe Union Council Chamber 

• KSU Wqtf Ski liam will meel ai 9 lonighl m Urncm 
206 

• SMden t CwKaf leteanh Avvordi of SSOO or* 

ovoikibia bf undeigroduoi* itudenri m a Keollh^ialoMd 
degree Applicahons, now arailobte in Ackert 413. ai> 
due by Dec S 



POLICEbloHer 

Stpwii art loiien directty from 1^ KSlott and liii»y Couniy police 
deparrmenf) doi^ log* VW do iwr list wheel hckt or minor rroffic violo- 
honi bfcous* ot ipoce conitromis 

KsTATf 

FRIDAY, Oa. 24 

• Al I 56 a m . Monle A Culshall. 1420 Hartman Apt 8, 
wos arrested lo* DU) He wos Ironsported to Riley County Joil 
For further processing 

• Al 6 34 p m . KrisloHer Siroin reported the ibeft of a giant 
Iguana bike^ Loss vras $600 

SATURDAY, Oa. 3S 

• A) 1 ! 55 p m on officer received o loud noise complaint 
Ironv Phi Gamma Delta There wos no loud noise upon the oHi 
CMS orrivd 



Mis, 



RILEYcouNTY 

SATURDAY, (XT. 25 

I At 12 32 a m . Todd A Bohn, 1632 McCom Lane, was 
issued a notice to appeor br minor in possession ol olcoholic 
liquor 

• At 1 2 53 a m , Eric Beckley, 142 1 N 6th St . was issued o 
notice lo appeor for criminol damage to property and unlawful 
use ol a drivers license 

• Al 1 02 a m , Jeff Hansen, 1803 Lotomie, was issued a 
notice to appear for unlawful use of a Kansas drivers license 
and mirior m possession of on alcoholic beveroge 

• Al 1 48 o m , Briar It Obhoti. Gorden City. Kon . wos 
issued a notice lo oppear lor mmor m possession ol alcoholic 
on private property and unnolmg in public 

• Al 2 ) 1 a m . Chmitian E Dodge, 1513 Pipbet Lone, was 
orrested for DUt Bond wos set al 1500 

• At 2 28 a m , Heother M Coots, 1 108 Gofdenway, wos 
arresled for DUI Bond wos set at S500 

• At 4 36 a m , Damon I f ewell. 830 Yuma, reported a pad 
(riminol damage to property loss was $200 

• At 1 1 30 a m Williom C PodgeW, 9 1 3 Leavenworth St , 
was arrested for DUI Bond was sel ol $ 1 ,000 

SUNDAY, oa. 26 

• At 3 o m , Krisia I Sadowske, Wichito wos arretted for 
DUI Bond wos set ol $500 




TOMT 

Wormer oisd 



Sunny and 
iDoch warmer 
Roin pcHsibfe 
bytfseersdof 

the we«k. 

Highs will bt In 

t*pfMt-60i. 



■YPHOM 
N[w»oOm 
S12-4SS6 

Aovnns**; 
S32-A3M 

ClAUffDS 

M2-455S 
•YI4UUL 

■YMAN. 

lUmAsSrMi 

COUfOUN 

1 1 6 Kbui Haii 

KAt«ASSTAtt 

UNVKsmr 

MANHAruN, KS 

66506 

IN ^«wON 
TitCoUtCMN 

tcwaooMtsM 
KtbX 116 

(ACtKUiFIKIM 
SnCfNlUMON). 



The KanM* State Cdlvgion lUSPS 291 020). a iKident n«wspapf« at Ifxunxn StoH Unn*i»ty, is published by Sludwl Publications Inc . Ktdm 103. Monholton. ICan 66506 The CoHegior^ n puUished wwkdoys dunng th« school yw» ar)d Mcb a week through the stimmw 
f«ri'.dk,i]l postage is paid at Manhoiiar), Kon 66502 PO^JMASUK Send oddeu changii b Konws State CoHa^, cwculoHon detk, Kadzte 103. Monhalton, Kon. 66506'7I6? ClOiHiASSwt COilWN. 1997 




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You m\eeed the qa\r\e to work the cor\ceee\or\ stand. 

You spent your Saturday/ clean in0 the highway. 

You etud'ied hard to make that honorary. 

Get Recognizedl 

More than 250 orqan\zat\or\e make K-Stat6 qreat. 
Make sure your group is in the 1998 Royal Purple 




These organizations are scheduled 
to have their pictures taken on 

Tuesday, October 26 



9:20 p.m. - Student Alumni 3oard 



Pictures will W takfii in McCain 324. 
The Royal Purpk- yc.irbtsok cm be piirclused .it this time for 124. '>5, 

Schedule an appointment for your organization in 103 K.cdzic for $15- 
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MONDAY, OCTOIIR 27, 1W7 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



March shows black women's solidarity 



AsiocunD mss 

PHILADrLPHIA Muinlrcds of 
thousands nt black wimcn sIikhI shoul- 
der U) shnuldiT ai ihc Million Woman 
Mafvh on Salurda). shov^iny ihcir 
iiolidarity and drawing ailcnlion to 
issues they believe niainsiTcam groups 
ijjntwc 

"(Jh m) posh So many. So many," 
JnAntic Royster o( Arlin^lon, Va . said 
in a hushed tone as she (mtked oiii ui ihe 
iT(»wd of blaek wi>nien 

l}y irain. car. plane and hundreds of 
dusts, hlaek vvon)en auswereil the call of 
Ihe grass-roots organi/crs, who esluiiat- 
ed 2A mdtion people Idled a niile-long 
avenue m earl\ aliermmn I • si i mates 
made by pohce otTieers ranged Itoni 
Mnmm to l millkm. 

"To ihe women of (he United Stak-si, 
to Afrtean-Amcrican women, I say 
amandla.'" VVmnie Madtki/ela- 
Mandeia told the chccrmg erovid, usiny 
the "[Ktwer" s Ionian Irom the tig hi I'oi 
black rights in South Al'riea "The power 
ofyuui call itnokcs your Alrieanistn and 
mine 

"We hu^c a shared destiny, a shared 



a'sponsibilily, to save the world IKim 
those who attempt to dcstniy it " 

The speech by Madiki/ela- Mandela, 
Ibrmer wife of South African President 
NelM^n Mandela, came at a rally at the 
end of the seven -hour program 

"A Her today, wr will never be the 
same." said Rep Maxine Waters. D- 
(alif "Anwrica, please be placed on 
notice: We kmw who we are We know 
what kind of ptiwer wc have We will act 
on that piiwer" 

Khadijah larrakhan. wife of Nation 
of Islam leader I ouis I arrakhan, noted 
the gathering was inspired by her hus- 
band's Million Man March in 
Washington, D.l' , two years ago 

"A nation can riH' no higher llian its 
women. Wc focus on women but cannot 
lose sight that we must rise as a I'anulv 
Men. women and children," she said 

The march provided a toruin lor 
is.itues that many blacks feel some 
women's groups do not focus on .Among 
them were human rights abuses against 
blacks, the start of independent black 
seh(Hils and a demand tor an invesiiga- 
lion into allegations of (lA involvement 
in the crack trade in black neighbor- 



IuhhIs. 

"I feel like I belong to a powerful 
bloc," said Roiianne Hrowne, 14, of 
Doston 

Tanya Heard, 2t\ ol C'liicugo said, 
"I'm getting a warm feeling seeing all 
these sisters " 

Ihe president of the National 
Organi/ation of Women said last week 
there are similarities between the 
marchers' agenda antt that of her group 

"We are all talking about women's 
health, education and violeiiee in 
homes." I'atrici.i Ireland said "(hi our 
national agciuhi. the issue ol women in 
prisons inav iioi he as Msible as die 
reprodiiciHe heahh issue, hut it's nol 
K'ing igiioreil." 

t)n Saturday, march lounder l*hile 
t hionesu stressed the ongiung coinimi- 
niiy involvement and ctn)|H'ralion >he 
wanted the march to initiate 

"I his IS n new ilav Prepare your- 
selves We arc taking hack our neighbor- 
hoiKls." said t hionesu, a coiitnuunty 
uctivisi whose insistence un a gr.iss- 
rtiots approach to organi/ing the march 
prompted controversy 

(Irgam/ers .ivoided usual channels 



lor publici/tng important c'vents. sucli as 
courting the mainstream media and 
soliciting corpitraic donations Instead 
they relied upon word of mouth, the 
Internet and the black media 

for Margie Armstrong, a cusnnlian at 
the liniversitv of Michigan, a feeling of 
solidarity de\ eloped even before she 
reached Philadelphia .Armstrong 
K'Crinie mi red in a tratVic jam on the 
Pennsylvania lunipike amid cars filled 
w ith black women 

"1 veryone was siiyiitg. 'Hi, sister.'" 
said Armstrong. ^1 "It was great " 

The Miarch siartv'il with a pi<Kession 
begnuimg a) "! .i ni near the 1 iK'riy llell 
.mil traveling two miles to a st.ige at ihe 
Philidelphia Museum of Art Aller light 
rainfall in the morning, clouds lingeted 
all day 

Men Irom the Niilinn of (slam in 
bowler hats, how ties and long black 
coals piovidcd security around the stage 
,irea 

Signs prixlamied "I am one in a mil- 
hon" and "Ulack Women No more 
AIDS, abuse, addiction." Women clam- 
ored to buy bullous. I-shiris, hats and 
Hags cmbla/oned w nb march logos 



Students to contribute 
to alumni center plans 



KltniNtOTO 

.lill it|ii.rifi 

luiiire K-Siate alumni from the 
College of Arehileeture are getting the 
chance to contribute their design con- 
cepts ui'ihe alumni center to be built on 
campus 

In their studios, I'illh-year arehitec- 
tuie students were given an assignment 
to propmse plans and designs for the 
new budding for the K •Slate Alumni 
Association Ihe new ahmuu center 
will be built south ol Memorial 
Stadium 

Kim Murphv, senior in arelntcctuie. 
said students were assigned to come -ip 
with the models, plans and pcrspccK.e 
dr.iwings h>r the new building and Ui 
use limesUme m their designs 

" this has been a big proiecl fttr us. 
We have been working prelly much 
since the beginning of ihe semester on 
It." Murphy said 

Murphy also said students were 
given a piogram list ol what the budd- 
ing sluiuld entail. I his inc hided things 
such as a hallriKmi. library, kitchen ,uvd 
cate. 



The students' designs will he a pan 
of this year's Bayer Stone coni|ielition 

fhcir works will be judged by a 
group of (urors Wednesday at Met'ain 
Audnoiiuiii file winners ol Ihe com- 
petition will then K' announced at a 
recepiion at 5pm 

Because none ol the students were 
licensed archilcvts. then designs will 
actually be used by tlic Alumni 
AssoeialKui 

"We are luiptng to he able to gue 
some insight lo what the budding could 
be This IS ,ilso a gmrd chaiuc lot peo- 
ple to see what we are doing and how 
we are contributing on campus." 
Murphy said 

Brad Sidener. director of li nance 
lor the Alumni Association, said the 
Alumni AssiKiatnin was happy lo get 
student iiivolvemeni on the projeci 

"We are very esctlcd to see the dil- 
lereiii ideas lioin .i siudeiu ivispeclne 
We are lii»pmj.' lo be .tbie lo pull Mime 
ide.is bom ihcii designs ' Sidener siid 

Ihc sltidenls' works will K' on dis- 
play Wednesday at Mc( am for the pub- 
lic III V lew 



Part of Durland named after dean 



COU IHMKI 

A dedicalitm ceremony I rukiy hon- 
ored a lormcr k -Slate f ollege of 
f.ngineermg dean by naming phase II of 
Durland ffall for him 

KalhKmc Hall is named hu Donald 
f. Kalhboiic. who retired in June and 
was dean ol the cidlege since I47,V 

IXinng his 24 years. RathNme over- 
saw Ihe devclopnieni of the college 
fnim an inslruciional operation prmliie- 
mg protessionals and then expanding 
inio rescirch aclivilies. grant evpansum. 
graduate work and. in recent years, spin- 
ning off mm ecoinmiic development 
activities. |)nncrsiiy Provost, James 
( olfman said, hut ihe students a-i named 
utmost 

"Don never lost sight of the central 
reason of the college's evistence. and 
that IS Ihe undergraduate professional 
engineering student," toMman. said 

(iary Idwurds. ihe chair of the col- 
lege's I ngineering Advistuy t'ouncil, 
also praised Kathhime's accomplish - 
meni<>. 

"We have watehed Dun transform 
Kansas State's engmeermg program into 



oneofthe top programs in America" 

Rallibone's career was filled with 
success and milestones, hdwards said 
and he gave several evamplcs 

• Undergraduate enrollment 
increased from less than I. IN HI to ntore 
than 2,5IH) larger than ihe two oihci 
Kansas engmeermg schools combined 

■ (iraduaie enrollment increased 
from 1 50 to .MH I 

• Research grants increased from 
^5tMUNI0 dollars lo nwre than S20 mil- 
lion 

• fne new degree pr()grams were 
added including computet science and 
informatuin systems 

• The college now has a milhon dof 
lar-plus scholarship program 

Pre !i idem Jon We fa Id said Rathbi^ne's 
work IS impossible to ignore 

"No mailer how you kK>k ,'it it. this 
college is better today hv lar than il was 
in 147.1." Wefald said. 

Rathhone said ihe college was fortu- 
nate lo have facuilv committed to teach- 
ing and to students and productive in 
research He also .said the student btuly 
was a truly outstanding group of young 
people. He added that the three phases 



ol the engmeermg cmnples make K 
State's engineering progr.im second to 
none national h hir a college of K -Slate's 

Sl/C 

"I his is a very humbling and ou-r- 
w hehmng eypcriencc foi mc," he s.ud "1 
don't know how I ean rcsp<iiid emotion- 
ally I am obviously deeply honored and 
most .ippreciative of the lecogmtion" 

Kathbone continues to woik as the 
part-time dncctor nl I and VJanagemciii 
and Iraiiimg 

Ralhbone Hall was phase II of the 
engmeeniig coinplcv ,ind hudi m l^til 
It includes .idminisiiatiu' oil ices, the 
I cRo) Pasley leciure hall, the Ihomas t 
Skmiu'i Video classioom and a rciii>iic 
computmg center 

Phase 1 Is Durland Hall, completed in 
|y7fi Phase IB IS yet to K' si.iricd but 
will have a imittiniedia leciure halt and .i 
high-iech electronic library Kathbone 
helped raise S 1 1 niillion lor Ihe planned 
.iddilion, as well as S\} million for the 
recent i sseniiul Idge ( ampaign. lo rec- 
ognise his role m planning phases I and 
II. the Kans4is ifoard of Kegenis 
approved \Veli«ld's riM|uest lo name 
pha^c II .liter Rathbime 



Albright promises talk on human rights 



ASSOCIATID mil 

WASHINCiTUN Chinese 

President Jiang /emin will gel a full 
picture of htiw 
Americans 
feel about 
China's human 
rights record. 
boih from 
protest 
dentonstra- 
lions outside 
and tough talk 
inside the 
White House. 
Madeleine 
Albright said Sunday 

The H'cretary of state also made 
n clear that while human nghls are 
just one aspect of inereasnngly 
important ties between the I ' S and 
China. "Wc will never have a com- 
pletely normal relationship with 
them until they have n better human 
righis policy" 

7cmin. who arrived Sut>d8y in 




jMing 



A^.^' 



Ihmolulu lo begin the first US 

visit by a Chinese leader m a dozen 

years, is expected to face protest 

rallies at each of his stops In 

Williamsburg. Va . 

\\'ashmgton. 

I'hil.idclphia, 

New York, 

Boston and 

I us Angc'les 

I hristtan 
groups were l<^ 
kick off the 
demonstrations 
Sundav with a 

prayer'vigil ^j^^ (^, 

.leross Irom the • 

White House to protest religious 
persecution in I hina and Ihe coun- 
try's abortion policies. 

Speaking of the historic hxulcs 
Jiang IS visiting in the United Slates. 
Albright said on NHC s "Meet the 
Press" that /emin "will not have a 
totally furry lime at these places 1 
think thai il is important tor him. 
actually, lo see where out liberty 



tame from " 

"I verywhere be goes in Uic 
United States. President Jiang /emin 
is going to meet with protesters He's 
going to sc*e and hear American 
voices on this. I can't think of ;iny- 
Ihing belter than that." Sen John 
Kerry. l)-MasH , said on CNN's 
"tale Idition" 

/emin. who ioh* to fniwei m die 
( hinese t ommumsl Parly hierarchy 
in the wake of the fM') 
Tiananmen ernckdown, meets 
t linton Wednesday for talks c\peci- 
cd to cover the issues ol iradc, 
weapons proliler,ition. laiwan. 
drug Iralficking and the 
environ mem rights 

"The import.inl part here tor us is 
to engage with China but nol 
endorse everything ihal they're 
doing," Albright said 

She laid substantial privgress has 
been made toward an agreement 
where China wtnild pledge nol to 

Sm china, Pog« 10 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



0«t«NfDtIO« 
MUNMMnW 



OUR ew 

Our Vi«w, an ecjitoriol 
^lecied and debaied 
by the editor lol board, 
tt wrtHen after o 
tnQ\o(ity opififori IS 
Wmcd Th« ediKHtal 
board coniitts d 
Coflcgion edilofi and 
o#ier iiofi inembeft 
Our v«ew It the 
Collegian's oHiciol 




MONDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1997 



Movie monopoly not to be taken with o groin of popcorn salt 



In a Lily v.hcK people tlaim ihcrc is 
nnthmg la ik\ one more thmg is 
■i\nv,h being removed IVom the list. 
A chan(;e in policies made by (aim ike 
Cinemas, the Arkansas -based owner of all 
Manhalun's movie tbeaters, is making sure 
jis primary audience is unable and unwilling 
lo go In the mwies 

I hiring ihe summer, the now owners 
raised prices, removed all student and mili- 
tary discounts I'rom the thcatcfs of a stu- 
dcnfmililary (own and then sal back to watch 
the money rull in 



Nol to gel mtstalgie tner sonvethtng tbal was 
less than 10 years ago, but there was a time 
when a $5 hill would iHtt jusi i;et y«>u a great 
mwie, but a buckcl of popcorn ami maybe a 
ColkC. too Today, if ytm wani to take a dale lo a 
movie, you'd hciur Itavc a catlil e4inj. 

The new prices could be undersiandahle 
becau.<ic (he thealers have needed imprme- 
menls for a while For one. the variety of 
mm les has been lacking lor years. If you arc 
nol Jnleresled in the top HI mmies as ranked 
by prc-pubcseenls. ihen you are out of luck. 

Of all ol l'W7i t)>car nominees for bcsi 



picture. Manhallan theaters had only shown 
one Variety has not changed yet. though If 
you are looking for an independently made. 
critically acclaimed film, you are Im^king at a 
one- to IWi)-hour drive 

Another needed addition is nwvies after 
^:>45 p.m. Midnight showings are anuvng the 
nittst pillar in other college towns llowevcr. 
that's not changing anytime soon, either 

But what can wc do about it we being 
ihc people ex pec led k) hand over our much- 
needed rmancial aid to sa' bo)i-ofriec busts 
like "(laiman and Robin"*' 



Take it to the city and ask them to encour- 
age outside busmess to come m and break up 
the I'armike momipoly 

Take it to the theater owners and let them 
know what you think and want out of your 
movie theater 

Take your business to Union 
Programming Council where the movies arc 
second-run, but cheap and still just an good. 

Take it home and watch vidcf>s from your 
own couch and probably with a much better 
sourid system. 

Dut whatever you do. doni just take it 



EDboord 




mutmmmum 


tAMMOOK 

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OMMSmiOt 


ChaOw 


tXTOTOI 


wnom 


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VDwItMi 



uattwnsKtn 



MMiCtBITOt 



DuiMtit* 



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The smoker in the wild 

As temperatures drop, smokers block entrances, 
forcing others to fight through smoke clouds 




It IS getting colder tnilsidc Everyone is breaking out the 
loats. kits ,ind gloves My grandfather is ctwenng all the win- 
dows m plastic wrap RcsptmsiHc people are having their 
aiiHlree/e checked. And the smokers are moving closer to the 
dimrs 

1 1 you chiRise 10 snfK>ke. .so be it I admit 1 think it is a dirty. 
Djslv hiibii. but I have some 
Jirlv iiastv habits ol ni\ own 
Smoking nui> cause cancer, but 
hit my vour luils can't be ginnl 
tor you either 

What IS I he dilTerencc 
bi-tween oral llxaiions really' 
\ici>ime addiction is a bad 
lliing. hut It is liard for me lo 
ludgc anyone until I have had at 
U-asi two cops ol cotVee A two- 
pack-. i-dav liahii lor HI years at 
S2 a pack IS a lot of wasted 
monev. but my collection of 
Lcramii co^vi isn't helping m 

the light lo stop world hunger or financing my children's col- 
lege education. 

Smoking' Isn't allowed msidc mo.st buildings on campus 
Vdviuoic. |ii>i jiboul every public place you go to has sent 
siiHikcis oiiiskle fhiiing mosi of the year, you can sptvt smok- 
I'ti hani-'ing out near their place of work, the residence halls or 
the k State Student Union They usually keep their distance 
Inmi the path ol those coming and going from the building 

Itui as Ihc seasons change, the smokers migrate, like 
sliaiige couuliing birds, Hocking ever closer to the entrances 



M A » T 



Ktt ttmt 

SMITH 



nor* m H>««ch Vcht con ttf^i * 
no^ 10 Mdi)r 0) moioSitii tfk/ 



and exits As we observe Ihe smoker in the wild, we notice they 
seem to travel in groups There is a pack mentality to them 
Usually there is a leader, the holtk'r of the fire, to whom all Ihc 
other smokers will turn to in a time of need 

fhcrc arc also a few lesser^rcspected members of this 
strange group They never have their own fire or tobacco prod- 
ucts, Ihcy just hover around the group until someone provides 
them With a cigarette This pnness is called "bumming " 

In the winter, if you are lucky you can witness the smokers 
bundled in coats, hats and scarves dancing around in the bitter 
cold desperately clutching their sticks of flame Whether this 
IS an attempt lo keep warm or a ntual to some g«td of nicotme 
IS not kmm n to outsider}! 

During most ot ihc year, 1 d<in'l even notice the snHikers. 
But as they move clo.ser lo the diHtrs in the fall and wmler. I 
can't help but nonce It isn't just the sea of butts strewn about 
the sidewalk and adjoining landscape It isn't just the used up 
lighters that didn't quite make it to the trash can 

It was a dry. cold morning. I had just walked halfway 
across campus I have a si h ma I huffed and puffed my way 
into iIk* building I had to dance my way through a group of 
simikers and was almost merconK by smoke I don't worry 
about the efl'ecis of second-haml smoke 1 just hate smcllmi; 
like an ashtray and coughing until my eyeballs bulge 

There was no wav to enter the building without walking 
through a cloud of snuike During that day, 1 noticed olhet stu- 
dents have the same problem getting into other buildings. I 
know II will only get worse as the weather gets colder. 

Ihe smokers will move closer lo the dinir in a feeble 
attempt to stay warm while ,sucking on fire and drawing 
smoke into their lungs. Anyone else see the irony in this .' My 



favorite ritual is 
when the 

smokers prop 
the diHir open 
and smoke 
outside This 
way tlic smoke 
IS pulled msidc, 
and the heat 
goes out with 
ihe smokers. 

Almost 
wwrse than the 
smokers are the 
smokeless- 
tobacco u,sers. 
The most 
important 

lesson I have learned since coming to this 
university is never to drink out of anything I 
can't sec the bottom ol and never leave a 
can nf anything unattended Which is more 
disgusting: cigarette butts or puddles of 
chew'' I he verdict is sidl out 

Some common courtesy ts in order. 
I'olks. 1 1 you have to smoke, line, but 
move out of the way of those ot iis who 
choose to get cancer the old-fashioned 
way t power lines and red meat) H 
you have to chew. well, find another 
bad habit 'cu/ that's just gross. 




^ \ 



SHANI rosaUtO/CaUagran 



Pesky alarms create problems in college when waking up is hard to do 




J O r-j 

tOH KUtCW .1 ^ l<.i^.mur. m 
pliyitci Vou COA Mn^ #.fnoil lo Jon 
at iiIMOMIm mdu 



I iicie Is a small wat going on in my rotMii right now 

il cmtkl have dire conscijuenccs tor Ihc rest ol the world. 

I I IS k'tvveen mc and my 
alarm clock, which I think is out 
to get me 

I bought my Magnavox X2 
because it is a sophisticated 
alarm, and ii has a cihiI name. Il 
IS also made by Magnavox. the 
vjmc people who developed 
piciuie-in-pKture technology. 
which means the instruction 
manual was bigger 

It can play preset compact 
disc tracks lo wake you up It 
has four dilTercnt ways of beep- 
ing al \ou lo get out of bed. and. of course, it has a radio The 
volume IS vuppr'ised to get pri^ressively louder if you don't get 
up imincdMlely to turn il off. which would be annoying a 
giHHl quality in an alarm 

The »Mily thing it doesn't do for you is make tt*ast and brush 
your teeth, primarily because ihcrc were some nasty accidents 
inu)King extra jelly and an overloaded servo The toothbrush 
ueiii berserk and Magnavoit scientiuls were picking up gooey 

READERSwrite 

Forking signs in city 
need to be clearer 

l.dilor. 

My husband, another alumna and I 
were vicmtu/cd m your city on Oct IK 
Atki Ihc Icsas A&M vs. K- State game. 
we p;uked our car at 7:25 p m in what 
we thought was a city parking lot near 
Burger Knig at 14th and Laramie streets. 

A Her spending money in a rcstau- 
lani and in a biHikstorc in Aggievillc. wc 
\tatkcd back lo the parting lot al K:$0 
pm (lur car was gone, and we were 
Hated It had been stolen Hut Burger 
Iving had it lowed, leaving us stranded 
hf> miles from home. Unknowingly, wc 
fiad illegally parked in Burger Kin);'s 
parking lot 

We told a security guard we were 
.ilumni from out of town and didn't 
umleistand that the back row. which is 
ilirecily adjacent to the public lot, was 
iiwiicd by Burger King He told us peo- 
ple make the mistake often, but the car 
was still parked illegally 

We luld him vm; didn't see any signs 
about illegal parking He pointed lo a 
Mgn on a hrick-cneloiied dumpster that 
lolil about illegal parking and being 



bits ot crash-test-dummy •Ivcad. which didn't make the dum- 
mies happy and convmeed Magnavox that consumers wouldn't 
be happy either 

In any event. 1 thought I had bought a giKMJ alanti clix'k It 
was so simple that a child could set it. and it was built to wake 
the dead 

Anyone know where I euuld get a gwNJ 4-year-old'' The 
child development center keeps refusing lo loan them out. 

You see. I'm out of my league My alarm has no snoo/e 
button It has more diak and sw itches than 1 have fingers I can 
adjust the brightness of the dock face, bui 1 still can't figure 
out hi>w lo shut It off I am a physics and biology major, and I 
can't shut off my stupid alarm. Nothing works Not even press- 
ing a random series of buttons, which is my usual approach 
when something is inoperaiive. 

Besides thai, my tiHimntates want to kill me 

In the Alpha lau Omega house, wc all sleep in separate 
cubbies. Of "holes," which arc these little boxes with winckiw 
blinds to cover the only entrance or exit This means that going 
to bed is a science in finding new ways nol to hit your head 
This is problematic for several reasons: 

1 1 In a box, you never know whether it's dayttmc becaasc 
yoii can't sec Ihc sun 

2) If you have a watcrbcd matims, you need a life preserv- 



er togei.inandouiof bed 

-1) If there was a fire, wc would all die. 

My alarm tuis the capacity lo penetrate outside of my 
cubby, down the hall, mio olhcr people's riHims and into their 
cubbies My alarm is so obnoxiously loud that my brain refus- 
es lo register it atiymoa* just to protect me My ri»onimates, on 
the other hand, are very const,'ious ol my alarm 

Bcep-bcep, 

"Kurchc ... " 

Beep- beep, 

•Kurche'" 

Beep- beep. 

"KURCME! Shut that damn thing ofT " 

Beep- beep 

"IT'S SUCKINCi MY WILL TO LIVL! Noooooo . " 

Bcep-bcep 

This IS on my lucky days Sometimes my alarm decides not 
to go olTat all I think my alarm thinks it's funny It could go 
ofTat the appropriate time one day and manage nol lo wake me 
up The next day it won't go ofl at all, and I haven't done a 
thing to it. It must have taken eonsislcncy lessons from the 
University Homecoming t ommittee I never afTectcd them, 
and I never atTeci my alarm, either, which is why I have decid- 
ed to dispose of it. 



I'm going to bury it in a remote corner of Memorial 
Stadium, alongside Jimmy HofTa 

Because I'm in the market for a new alarm, one of the 
options I m looking at is the "Wading Ban.sbee 21HMI, " a sim- 
ple, battery-operated device, which, on iLs tuwcsi setting, will 
spill eardrums in China It is specialty designed to emit high- 
frequency, "no-sleep" waves, which are only audible to plants 
and Jerry Spnnger 

In the end, though, alarms arc really all just a poor imita- 
tion of Mom I have very fond mcirmries of very gixtd dreams 
being very rudely intruded upon by my mother Nobody can 
nit-pick a person out of bed like Mom. 

1 miss u 

I miss having the light turned on and the radio turned way 
up in an effort to revive mc I miss being yelled at that I'm 
wasling my life because I have things to do I miss being shak- 
en repeatedly t miss that feeling of triumph when she would 
give up and go away 

1 miss her coming back with my 3IXI-pound stepfather who 
wxiuld sit on me until 1 agreed lo gel out of bed 

Those vrerv the days 

Maybe I should invest in the toothbrush attachment for my 
Mngnavox 



lowed Wc told him wc didn t see the 
Sign when wc parked because other 
vehicles had blocked it from our view 
and It was dark 

He told ui where we could get our 
ear and that we'd have to take a taxi to 
ihe wrecker service. All of the blaiTK 
was placed on us, while wc fell wc were 
being victimised. 

We had to get JlifJ from an ATM to 
retnevc our car. which was towed about 
25 minutes aflcr wc parked Wc were 
also fined S25 from the city for parking 
illegally I can't believe how awful a 
busmess and the City of Manhattan 
would treat K- State alumni, ci^>ccially 
on Homecoming weekend 

Obviously, a problem exists in this 
parting lot. except for those who can 
cam money from the problem The sign- 
ing is inadequate and and needs to be 
placed directly in front of the row where 
people arc parking illegally Also, a 
fence should be erected so pei^le can 
sec where ihc boundaries between the 
public and Burger king parking lots arc. 

If the business owncTs and Ihe City 
of Manhattan do not appreciate us, 
alumni can go to other cities for enter- 
tainment 

I'm nol spending any more of my 



money al K- Slate sporting events. 
Manhattan Town Center or local craft 
shows if this is how Manhattan treats 
visitors 

Jen Clouston 
K-Slate-Salina graduate, I OKh 

David ( louslon 
K-State graduate, 1981 

Trudy Hiatt 

K -State graduate, 1981 

Finals need to include 
a weekend break 

Iditor. 

Well into my third semester as a K- 
Stalc student, I have had some lime to 
rcHcct on this wonderful institution 
Like every other student, I wani K-Slale 
to be the best it can be 

One impnwemeni 1 think would help 
K-StaU: concerns the tlnals schedule We 
have a fivc-conscculivc day finals sched- 
ule 1 wmild like to sec the university go to 
a finals schedule tfiat is split try a weekend. 

The University of Kansas hat * dif- 
fcreni finals schedule than ours Its 
schedule has some highlights wc should 



consider. For example, this semester. 
KU's "slop day" (designated study day) 
falls on Wednesday, [)ec 10 finals are 
scheduled from Thursday, Dec. 1 1 , 
Friday, tXx 12, Monday, t)cc 15 to 
Thursday, Dec IK They also have three 
designated exam tune slots during the 
day and <me at night Therefore, a stu- 
dent could possibly have four finals in 
one day KU allows students to work 
with Ihc university in this situation lo 
reduce their lesls lo only two per day. 

I would like to a,sk the Committee on 
Academic Policy to consider a finals 
schedule like the one al KU I think il 
would benefit students by allowing extra 
study lime Splitting the week of siress 
with a weekend would also help students 
regain composua' before plunging back 
into the dreaded finals. 

Jenny L Johiuon 
sophomore in advertising 

K'SlQte eommende^ , 
for Homecoming ipirit 

Editor, 

We'd like to commend studcnu, fac- 
ulty and administrators of K-Stitc for 
their enthusiasm and spirit during the 



flomectHDing i 

The Manhattan community and the 
university were benefited in a variety of 
ways Wc would like to thank the near- 
ly 3,(HMt students wrbo participated in 
the Paint It Purple community service 
project ciMirdinatcd by the United Way. 
For SIX Saturdays prior to 
Homecoming, student volunteers spent 
several hours working in the communi- 
ty collecting trash, organizing commu- 
nity events, remodeling buildings, 
completing inventory and hanging 
posters shout Domestic Awareness 
Month 

More than 2,M)ti pounds of canned 
fiHxt and S75 in donations were collect- 
ed at the preliminary bodybuilding com- 
petition 

These donations, which are increased 
from last year, were given lo the Flint 
Hills Breadbasket 

Besides benefiting the community. 
this year's Homecoming increased tlic 
pride of Wildcat Land A scne« of week- 
long events aimed lo raise the purple 
pride be I ore the HorrKComing football 
game The ali-univcrsity Homecoming 
committee planned daily events that 
everyone could participate tn — a 
Homecoming kick-off pep rally, a punt- 



and -pass competition and a liiy desif* 
nalcd to wear purple. 

And the return of the bontlre should 
not be forgotten This year an all-com- 
munity pep rally attracted residence 
halls. Black Student Union, greek orga- 
nizations, alumni, faculty and passers- 
by 

Nearly il.fXMI people welcomed hack 
the tradition of the bonfire, cheered on 
the Cats in the Pant The Cham competi- 
tion and got fired up for the game 
against Texas A&M 

Saturday's ganw proved to be one of 
the most-spinled Students and alumni 
roared as the Cats found victory over the 
Aggies One can't help but credit some 
of this spint to the Homecoming act i vi- 
nes dunng the week 

The university should be commend- 
ed on lis positive accomplishments for 
Homecoming This win was an ideal fin- 
ish for a week of hard wori. cnthuaiaim 
andclTon 

Jami Nelson 

Panhellenic Executive Secretary 

Chns Hansen 

Inicrfratemtty Council Vic« 
President 



^m^ 




MONDAY, OCTOtER 27, 1997 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




Clinton 



Clinton 
to visit 
Wichita 
Nov. U 



ASsociATio nu$s 

wit IH lA Presidcni flinlon 
is schciltiltid to visit Wichilu next 
rnonlh t« help ileilicaie a new facil- 
ity used hy Cessna Airenift to move 
welfare reeipients into jobs, aeeord- 
ing to a publisheJ report. 

The 
Wichita 
fiagle report- 
ed Salurilay 
that Clinton 
will arrive in 
Wichita Nov 
1 7 to dedi- 
cate Cessna's 
job training 
center, a wel- 
fare-to-work 
facility locat- 
ed in an impoverished neighhoor- 
hood on the city's northeast side. 

Cessnas job-traiiimg program 
started in IW<i and was recently 
relocated. 

A White House official told Ihe 
[:agle that Clinion's appearance 
won't be formally confirmed until 
about a week before I he dedication. 
The visit could no) he confirmed 
with the White Mouse by The 
Associated Press 

Clinton had spotlighted 
Cessna's cH'orts last spring in a 
White House cereinony, saying 
more businesses should develop 
such priigrams. 

Cessna Chairman Riiss Meyer 
Jr. utiended the ceremony and 
extended ihe invitation to CItntun 
about u month ago 

"\\'e understanit dial it is on Ihe 
pR'sident's schedule, and I don 'I 
know thai it's an absolute guarantee 
that he will he here," Meyer told the 
newspaper. "But we're certainly 
oplimislic, hopeful and gralefut" 

Clinion has noi visited Wichita 
since he was elected presidcni . As a 
candidate m IW2. he made a bricl 
slop to refuel his plane al the city's 
Mid-C onlmeni Airport. 

The new facility allo^vs Ces-^na 
lo train and hire more low-income 
workers and oflers shorl-ierm 
housing and day care amcnilics 
unavailable at the old lacility. Kxat- 
cd a lew blocks away. 

Since the project Marled 2fi2 
people have enlercd the sheet 
metal training program with 1 46 of 
those trainees now eniployed by the 
company. 

Gov. Bill Graves and U.S. 
Agriculture Secretary I>an 
tilickman are expected to attend 
the dedication. 



I RISTORANTE 

I MARCO POLO 

I Tamlly owned Itiilliin i iiKlrit- 

I •Specializing in pasta, 
\ seafood & steaks 

J 'Classic Italian dishes 

I -Larcie selection of wines 




I 0^t(■n (or l.um h OInni-r 
|3003 Anderson 



!i39!i3(.m 




Kansans with HIV 
to lose medication 



Assocuno nitss 

WICHITA - A shortfall in a federal 
t'und could mean up id three niogilhs with- 
out life-saving medication fur pour 
Kansans infected with the AIDS virus, 
health olTicials say 

State ufTieials expect the fund that pays 
for the medicine abitut SXMMKMI per 
year lo run out sonietiiiic in January T he 
fund won't k- replenished until April I, the 
stan of Ihe federal budget year 

The shortfall will aliecl about I. Ill 
Kansas residents, Ihe Kansas Deparimeni 
of Health and Hnvin^nnienl said and many 
of them won't survive vviihoul their med- 
ication 

"Research shnws that when you go o(T 
vour medications, the v inis builds up resis- 
tance So v^hcn you pi back on, the med- 
KJlions are no longer elTective," said 
Diinna Sweet, a Wichita physician ^^ho^e 
practice includes about 55t) Hi\'-inti;cted 
patients. 

Sweet and others attribute the funding 
shortfall to the recent availabiliiy of drugs 
thai art more elTeclive in conlrolling the 
virus, and the drugs' success in helping 
people U\v longer The new drugs are more 
expensive, himever 

An average month's medicalion cost 
between SI, 2IKt and Sl,.lt>t), Svteei said 

The Ryan White Care Act. which pays 
for AIDS drugs for the needy, is federally 
funded It d<H>s nnl involve state la\ dollars 

KIJHI- officials will meet this vveek to 
H'our their budgets in hopes ol finding an 



extra S 1 5(t,0(H). the amount needed to off- 
set the shortfall, said department 
spokesman IXin Brown 

They'll also ask pharmaceutical compa- 
nies to donate or lend ihe needed medica- 
tions. 

'T ots of people who arc HIV-positive 
aren't on Ryan White, but for (hose who 
are, this is iheir last resort," Brown said 
"There's nothing else out there" 

Concern over the shortfall took I'.S 
Rep Todd Tiahrl's office by surprise 
Iriday 

"This is the first i'vc heard of it." said 
Dave Manna, spokesman for Tiahn. R- 
(ioddard. "We'll look into it and see what 
wt can do," 

last year KDHP. officials headed off a 
similar funding shortfall b> taking money 
out of accounts that helped pay for dental, 
meiilal-heahh and home -health- care ser- 
vices for people with .\I[)S. Those 
accounts are now depleted. 

"We've put everything into the medica- 
tions fund and it's still not enough," said 
Benjamin Klein, execulise director of 
Connect Care, a Wichita-area pr«>gram that 
serves about 2(K1 HIV-infected people 
Klein serves on a KDHf. commidce that 
mer>ees ilw Ryan White (.are Act fund 

Hill likleberry. 3**. lives in a house 
iipcratcd bv Conned Care. He has lull- 
hhnvn AIDS. 

"If I lose my funding, I'll hau- lo slop 
taking my mediealion and I'll he prone lo 
anything that comes along I'll tie sick all 
ihe lime, like I was before." he said 




KARI AND DIST1NEE 

PUGH o( Junction City 
colof o picture ol 
"Spookioculof for the Kids' 
Sotutdoy oflernood Ol 
Sunwl Zoo "Spooktaculof 
(or ihe Kids" provided Mife 
tJitk^jriteoltivg lor oreo 
ktdi and parents 

JfRCOOMi 



Midwest rail-car shortage Jeopardizes U.S. grain exports 



Assocuno Ptiss 

OMAHA. Neh Record gram har- 
vests aren't unusual Neither are period- 
ic shortages of railviay cars Iti ship the 
grain 

Hut this year, particularly bountiful 
torn, wheat and sir^bean crops .ire piling 
up on the ground because a sort nf rail- 
road traffic jam between the rution's 
fields and key gram ports on the ( iulf ivf 
Mexico have spread along the rails of 
Ihe newly enlarged Union Pacific 

farmers, gram elevator managers, 
and p»lilici;fis blame the rail tie-ups on 
Uni(«) Pacific'* 4>urchase of J>tiythcrn 
Pacific Railroad which created (he 
nation's largest railroad fhey thmk the 
railroad is overwhelmed 

Union Pacifit said the toitgcsiion 
would be worse had it not purchased ihc 
Soulhem Pacific and its key lines, but 
agrees there were problems. 

hrm eJtpetts fear the backlog will 
ruin ihe nation's international markets 
and could sink gram prices 

'll is a lerrible iikss, the wtirst we've 



ever seen." said Bill Scbree of NIK 
Marketing, which cmirdi nates grain 
shipments (or 112 elevators in 
\cbraska. Iowa and Kansas 

"We are running belter than 30 days 
behind schedule for guaranteed grain 
trains to arrive and we ha\e loaded 
trains sitting siill for up to I wo weeks," 
he said "Elevators arc losing up lo 
S.Kt.tKHI on each tram that's late" 

The probletit is already alVeclmg 
most of the nation's grain-producing 
stales, and the grain piles are a visible 
sign ol shipping proMems that federal 
regulator*' wilt diHCUs^ at a hearing 
Miiuday in Washington, D.l 

"I Is so ptvhtical and I don't want to 
upsei the railroad.s by saying anything." 
said Rick Sorenson, manager of the 
I ont menial lirain Co. Outside his eleva- 
tor in Shelton, about I5t) miles west of 
Omaha, TINMNMt bushels of gram sttKid 
in a pile ncarlv three slorics high on a lot 
ball the si/e of a ciiy bliH'k. 

Sales of soybeans for export have 
reached onlv aboul half ihe amount sold 
bv (his lime last year, said Bill 



Biedermann, a commodiiv analyst with 
Allendale Inc in tryslal lake. III And 
only about 20 percent of what's been sold 
overseas b.is actual K been shipped s«i far 

"The demand for I S grain is good 
but the guys on the dock are not deliver- 
ing." Uiedermann said "Our tbreign 
customers will be forced to go to other 
countries lor their imptirled gram if they 
have lo wait much longer 1 his is a huge 
problem for L.S agriculture " 

Union Pacific cites problems atfcct- 
ing Its merger partner 

Railroad sptikesman John Bromlc'y 
said floods and derailmeiUs in Tenas hap- 
pencxt at the same time shipping business 
increased and that all eomhiiied to iner- 
whelm Ihe Southern Pacific, 

Union Pacific sent some of its 
empl(t>ees. locomotives and equipment 
to help, but that diversion nieani the traf- 
fic jams spread. 

Now -loaded grain cars wait in rail 
yard-s for locomotives, which may be 
busy elsewhere lleav\ tralHc alony the 
routes to the dull ports mean it lakes 
longer for the gram trains I hat are mov- 



ing to make the Inp, v^hich delays the 
return of loeomoiives and enipiy cars 

The timing couldn't K.' worse f«ir 
larmers who are reaping .m e\pcvied 
record soybean cmp. the third- latgesl 
corn crop and above-average iililo and 
wheal crops 

"Rail car shortages ok not nev\ 
What makes this year so odd is the 
amount of gram coming in," said Don 
Rixiscat US Commodities Inc ol West 
|)cs Moines. Iowa "It's a strange phe- 
nomenon." 

He estimates larmers are losing 
about II) cenb per bushel of grain 
because of rail delays 

"People are worried they will have to 
sil on their gram for a while, especialK 
if prices are alVected," s.iid Howard 
I etler, a corn farmer near faimioni 

(iram elevators want more coveted 
btipper cars lo hold ihe grain, and tnion 
Pacific said elc^ator^ arc part I v to blame 
lot holding grain trom last season "s crop 
in hope of rceeiv ing k'tter pnccs this year 

Ihc railroad has }.l,tKHl gram cirs 
and Bromley said more won't solve the 



hv 



problem 

"You don't fi\ a traffic jam 
addinj; more ears." Bromley said 

III ihe meantime, elevators across the 
Midwest are turning away Iresh crops 
because their storage bins .md outdoor 
stiK'kpiles are overflowing In Kansas. 
elevators have been forced tu shut down 
for up lo three days al a time while they 
wail for rail cirs 

Roose said (he gram futures markets 
have not yet bs'cii alJected k-cause niosi 
■inalysts klteve the siluaiion will work 
Itself out 




"K-Slate Grad 88 

'Call Us For A Quole 



3320 Anderson 



539-92001 



LJ4-i I Happy Hi rt I It lay! 




Sylvia Plalh 

IIh:j21 



•RESERVE DRY ICE 

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•GRUESOME APPLIANCE 
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i37-Z002*lW AQGIEVILLI 




r 



American Legion 

BINGOi 

Sunday 2 p.m. 

Tuesday 1:30 p.m. 

Wcdnecday 7:30 p.rti. 

*l* per card 

Up to '300 Gwh 

Sundav flc ' 



^ 




Electrical and Computer Engineering Students — ^ 

w 

Early Enrollment for SPRING 1998 

Check Ihe bulletin board behind the EECE otrice (RA 261 ) for details of the Early EnroJlmcn 
procedures. Early enrollment will only be conducted: 




SENIORS AND JUNIORS: 
ALL STUDENTS: 
EXTRA SESSIONS: 



THURS. OCT. 30 & FRL OCT. 31; l:00PIVf^:30PM 

Mon. Nov. 3,10 & 17 from 1 :0(M:30pra 
Fri. Nov. 21 from 1 :0(M:30pni 



SIGH-UP SHEETS WILL BE IN THE EECE OFFICE TUES. OCT. M 




PIZZA 

SHUHLE 

deliver; 

77^577 

1800 Claflin Road. 



Joyce's Hair Tamers 



We t-ame the tou^h onee 



Perms 

(Reg, !H0-$4S) 

Sale 

$30-$3& 

inc\ude€) cut & style 



Haircuts 
Shampoo and Style 
gals $12.50 
uys $6.50 



2026 Tuttle Creek 




530-TAME 



$ 

$ 
$ 



oaaaBBBBBOBaxi 



axtxxxxM 



A Reminder To All 
Alls $ Sciences Students.^ 

Enrollment time is quickly 
approaching so make an early 
appointment with your advisor. 

Arts & Semen CcuneU 



Chicken 5aiad 
Combo Meal 



5f? ^3.95 



hrewhoLJSt 



Includes chips pickle and 
either drink, corfee or cookie. 

Pro wo good Monday -SuMday, Oct Z7-Nov. t 

( .tMK > 1.1 IJlli A M.it It ■ \l 111--. Il IIKI 1 .iV« PllilM^ ' \kK1. \ lUl 




Starting ot $6.50 per hour 

AHENTION, STUDENTS! 

Help needed to take inventory in retail 

stores. Average 10-12 hours, mostly on 

weekends . Weekday mornings also 

available. Math aptitude is a must. 

Apply in person 



rmw^mwmmmwmrrmnrwvmmMmm*t.MM 



$in the Kansas Room, Ramada Inns 
$ s 

$ Wednesday, Oct. 29 at 6 p.m. s 

% $ 




SPOilS f OITCO 
SUNDnMUS 



KANSAS STATE COl LEGI A N 




MONDAY, OCTOetR 27, 1997 



SPORTS 
SHORTS 

( OWIt.lU) IKtiM Till l\S(>i lllin l-HI'^'^ 

BIG 12 RUNDOWN 

No )*) Oklaltoim Stak- und Texas Tcth 
cunlrol ihcir imii ilcslinlc!> in (he Big 12 
soulh. Y<;t, a% \hv scalcsi iif dominance tip fur- 
ther luward the ni)rit), destiny is looking like a 
very rou^h December afternoon in San 
Antonio 

Up<itan Missouri, the north's third-best 
team bchinii lop- ranked Nebraska and No. \i 
K -Slate, ended OSD's dream run Saturday in 
a 5 1 -5U double overtime win. Tctas Tech's 16- 
13 win over No ^5 Texas A&M ereatcd a 
first -pi ace tie. 

"We need to play hard and come up with 
the wins." Ked Raiders quarterback Zebbic 
Lcthndgc said 'Hetore you know ji we will 
be playing in the Big 1 2 championship game, 
andlhut is our goal" 

Three south teams that ^^on't be at the 
Alamodome on Dec 6 look more northern 
liunps Saturday E^aylor lost 24-17 in towa 
Slates first victory, Texas fell in a 47-30 
shotttout agamsl C oloradu and injury-slowed 
Oklahoma lost 26-7 to K-Statc. 

The .suuih is a combined S-*) againsi the 
north, whose teams have managed to beat all 
six south learns ai least once. 

Meanwhile, likely litle eunlender 
Nebraska and K-Staie have yet to Inse an 
inierdiv isonal game 

Once Tony Ri)gcr> had cued a late 47-yard 
field goal otl I he left upright Saturday l» drop 
A&M 15-2. 2-2) into third place, Tccii (4-3. 3- 
I ) turned lis ganu.' against ihc Wildcats next 
week into a pivotal Big 12 affair 

"Today we did anything possible lo gel our 
third win in a rem." l.ethndgc said. "We need 
to continue to slay fiKUsed." 

^(H.■us was dilficuh for Missouri after ihc 
Tigers fended olV Tony Lindsay's lwo-p«)int 
conversion It) lo end the second overtime 
period The mayhem in Stillwater featured a 
teary-eyed coach l.arry Smith, an assistant 
knocked out ctild by a jubilantly throw n hel- 
met and a pavsel ol da/ed C owboys (6- 1,3-1 1. 

"Thi.s pul Us on another level," said 
Missouri quanerback torby Jones, who threw 
for four touchdowns and ran for two more 

t)St IS on another level now, t(H> In one 
v*ild moment, ihe t owboys went from being 
the souths shining light in being jusi another 
pan of the first-place dogfighl 

They'll travel to College Station to face a 
troop of wounded Aggies OSlJ's Itvss kept 
A&M very much alive, but not (i>r lotig if il 
suffers a third-straighl vonference defeat 

"We have a great opponent next week." 
A&M coach R.C. Slocum said. "We are 5-2 
nghl ntnv. and it will be interesting losec what 
we do as a team We have a lough stretch in 
Uelobcr. and it will be a real challenge to sec 
if we tan come back" 

Texas (.1-4. l-.li sustained its year-long 
implosion again.st struggling Colorado in a 
game that was fancied lo have had national 
championship implications just iwo months 
ago Rieky Williams' 20l.yard rushing day 
was little comfort for agitated alumni. 

Oklahoma (3-5. 1-3) was helpless without 
star running back Dc'Mond Parker, who had 
Just four carries because of a strained abdom- 
inal muscle 

Baylor (0-4, 1 -6) allowed Iowa State to end 
a 13-game skid 

SOCCER RESULTS 

Missouri 4, Iowa State } 
Oklahoma State 2. I^mporia Stale 1 
Oklahoma 2, Nebraska I) 
Wichita State 6. Pittsburg State I 
Kansas 5. Missouri 2 
K-Stale 4, Iowa Stale .1 
Oklahoma 7, 1 mporia State 11 
Oklalwma Suie 5. Pittsburg Slate 1 
Championship Kansas and Oklahoma 

ttie*) 

•The lournameni was shortened because 

of heavy rain that closed the soccer fields ai 

Anneberg Park, necessilalmg a tie 

WORLD SERIES 

Marlimi 3, Indians 2 

NFL 

Ravens 20, Redskins 17 

Giants 29, Bengals 27 

Eagles 1 3, Cowboys 1 2 

Broncos 23, Bills 20 (overtime) 

Chiefs 28, Rams 20 

4%rs 23. Saints 

Vikings If), Bucs 6 

Oilers 4t, Cardinals 14 

Chargers 35, t olts !<> 

Steclcrs2), Jaguars 17 (overtime) 

Seahawks 45. Raiders 34 

Panthers 2 1 , f-alcons 1 2 

Open date IX-iroit, New York JetK 

Mmday V (iames 

(ireen Bay at New l.ngland 

Chicago ai Miami (regiomil broadcast) 

NBA PRESEASON 

Orlando 101, Houston »<^ 

NHL 

Mighty Ducks 3, NY Rangers 3 
Kings 3, lightning I 
Humcxnes 3, Black hawks 2 
Red Wings 5. Canuckx I 
Sabrexai Cuyates(laie) 



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KSTATi DEFENDERS 

(fee saiety Jorrod Cooper 
ond Imebocker Mark 
Simonoau gong loekle 




^ *- 




^ 


Moore Saturday in Ower' 
Field m Normon, Okia 
S>mon»ouhod Ulocklei 
on the doy, white Coofier 
added 6 

CUf MlMStlta 



Cats blast 
Sooners, 
take No. 13 



If you started attending classes at K-Slale in l.ill 
1^'^3 and are on a seven-year plan lo pick up a lotir- 
ycar degree, three things iirc absolutely certain 

1. You'll never completely pay olT your sludoni 
loans 

2. You need to spend more time at Hale 1 ibrarv ,iiid 
fewer nights in Aggievitle 

And 

3 You'll never see K-Stalc lose lo Oklahoma, a 
team rich with history and tradition ihal once bullied 
the Wildcats on the Imtball field lor decades 

The Cats beat the Sooners 26-7 Saturday, eafimig 
their fitfh- consecutive victory over Oklahoma and 
improving to 6- 1 on the season. 

Considering the teams won't meel for the next ivvo 
seastms, Oklahoma can't possibly beat K -State until 
the year 2(HK) unless the two schools play in a Big 12 
championship game 

for Ihe third-conseculive week. K-St,iie's defense 
limited iisupptment lo one touchdown .Mso, the ( atN 
limned t)klahoma running back [)e'Mond Parker, .i 
Heisman Trophy candidaie. lo ininus-ihrce yards on 
four carries, with a long gam of zero yards. 

But the win didn't come as easy as it looked on 
paper 

"Il was a hard game," linefvacker JetT Kelly sand "Il 
wasn'l like the game wa> a brcc/e " 

K-States otTcnse. which entered the game .ivet.iL!- 
ing 403 7 yards a game, including 24K yards on llie 
griiuniL could only manage 162 rushing yards and .Oil 
yards iw era 11 

Meanwhile, the derense. which was allowing only 
242 5 yards a game and was coming oil a mmus-Ti 
performance againsi Texas ,'\&M's \o 5-ranked rush- 
ing offense, gave up 277 yards to ihe Sooners 

"tte played pretty well Ion deteiisci, but not as well 
as the last two weeks." K-Stale coach ftill Snyder said 

Offensively, K-Stale scored often enough to win 
easily, hut commilted mistakes early ihut prevented ihe 
t ats from conirollmg the game early 

K-State opened the game looking like ihc dominani 
learn it had^'cn in the p.tsi two weeks On the game\ 
opening drive, the ( ats moved the hall 52 yards on 1 ' 
plays 

Mow-ever, they couldn't convert dominance iiilu 
points, as Martin (iramalica shanked a 45 -yard ficM 
goul attempi It was his first miss m 13 attempts this 
season, missing wide let) 

See GAME, Page I 



ESPN/USA Today 



jr 



Coaches Poll 



1 

4 tAt-Kqan 

7 

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10 VMufijiwi Saw 

11 A»b<0(^ 

11 ucu 



1-9 

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1} Gm'^ 

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II 

19 I 

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21 AnMna&M 

n vmd 

SyracuH 



2S trqliaa^NMt 



M 

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^1 

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70 



Oklahoma uses strong safety 
as quarterback against Cats 



ScHiM ESttl Soanuon* 



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JIPaP Top 25 




1 Mikmkm 


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14 GMrgio 


6.1 


7 VrSiok 


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16 ISU 


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MM INOILMAIDT/Ccl^«t 



UUHniMNNU) 

K -State fiMUball games have 
produced a lot of unusual things 
this year 

fkiuble reverses, firsl-tjuartcr 
onsjde kicks, lake punts, count- 
less 4uarterback draws, a wish- 
bone offense, 4(i-yard runs on 
quarterback draws you name 
It, the t ats have been through it 

But dunng Saturday's game 
at Oklahoma, ihe S<Miners actu- 
ally pulled off stvmcthing the 
Cats hadn'l seen this season. 

|-ric Moore and Justin fuente 
lmik turns at nuartertwck. Mmire 
tends lo run Ihe option, while 
l-ucnie is Ihc Sixiners' primary 
passer. 

Defending against a quarter- 
back platiMin IS nothing new for 
K- State's defense 11ie Cats shut 
d4wn a similar duo last week 
against Texas A&M 

Against Oklahoma, ihey shut 
down Ml Hire and fuente. frus- 
trating Sooners' t oach John 
Blake And when HIakc became 
tiKi frustrated, he turned the irick 
thai K -State had vei to see from 



an opponent 

lie put a strong siifety in al 
quarterback 

And Brandon Daniels, who 
became the new director of 
Oklahoma's option attack, didn't 
do t(H> badly 

Daniels gamed K4 yards on 
13 tames, an average of 6 5 per 
rush, and scored the Sooners' 
only touchdown. 

"Thai dude is really quick." 
K -State linebacker JelT Kelly 
said 

Daniels helped lead 
Oklahoma to its only touchdown 
against K- State al the beginning 
of Ihe third quarter 

"I thought I hat Daniels kid 
was playing well," K-State coach 
Bill Snyder said "He is quiic an 
athlete His spcx'd hurt us He is 
remarkably faster than anyone I 
know" 

Daniels ru.shed four limes for 
.to yards on ihe drive, includini; 
a six- yard scamper liir ihe s^-ore 

"We wcft" inipresH'd w iih his 
performance today We have 



K-State/Oklahoma Game 

Here ore the itolislict frorn the K Slaie/Oklahomai gome Soturday. 

Oklahomo K-State 



First downs 


16 


15 


Rushes*Yords 


52124 


46-162 


Passing 


153 


158 


Cemp-A(t-lnt 


) 1-17-0 


8-16-0 


Rstum yards 


26 


11 


Punts-Avg. 


6-38 


4-29 


Fumbl«s-loft 


6-2 


2-0 


PenalHcs'Yards 


10-67 


3-16 


Poss«ssion time 


30 00 


30 00 



INDIVIDUAL STATISnCS 






RUSHING-Oklohofno. Domes 13-84, Tboicber 9-22. Rose 
8-21 , Moore 9 1 6. Fozonde 2-6, littfetl 3-3, Porker 4-(m(nus 
3|. Fuente 3 (mmui 5|, Joekson 1 -(minus 20) 
K-Stato, Hickson 19-82, Lawrence ta57, Goolsby 6-25, 

Bishop I ) -(minus 2). 

PASSING -Oklahoma. Fuente 8 l?-aiOO, Moore 3 5^ 

53 

K-Sloto, Btsop 8 1 6-0 1 38 

RiCIIVING- Oklahoma, little 5 83. S Alexander 3 29. 

Thotchef 2 34, Jackson 1-7. 

K-$lal«, Mickson 3^2, Peries 2 75, McDonaU 2-24, Grosdider, 

117 



See SOONERS, Poge I Sourc* S|Mhi<ita<m[>f>Go 



ANMEW MAIKINIAK . Jlwtai 



Cats defeat No. 12 Texas A&M, lose to Texas 



SUN Ml MHU 

Night and day 

That's the only way to describe ihe Wildcat 
volleyball leam's 3-0 defeat of No. 12 Tesas 
A&M on frtday and the 3-0 loss to No. "^ 
TcKas on Saturday 

In fridays 15-6. 15-2. 15-2 match, K- 
State had what junior middle blixker Val 
Wicek called a steady peiformance 

"Before the game started (Friday I nighl, 
we were all feeling very siciidy, no nerves." 
Wieck said 

That mental altitude helped to shut down 
Ihc Aggies' offense. The Cats kept the Aggies 
lo I negative .03 1 attack pfrcentsge, Ihe sec- 
ond time in two weeks the Cats limited an 
opponent lo a negative attack percentage 

Aggie hiltcn Knsiic Smedsrud and Stacy 
Sykon, ranked ninth and tilth m ihe Dig 12 in 
kills per gBme, had a \m combined attack 
peftcntage fw the match 

Wieck had Id kills on 14 allempis and 
total blocks Kcllc Bran ling recorded seven 
kills im 14 bits und had one solo and six 
as.siated blocks. 



"When we had a huge block, we'd slap 
hands calmly and say 'Nice job,'" Wieck said. 
"If we had a huge kill, same thing If ihey got 
a block, we'd say, 'We'll get the next one.'" 

That calm exterior crumbled at the hands 
of No *J Tcdas on Saturday nighl. 

l.x-Cat coach Jim Mmire brought his new 
team into Abeam field House undefeated m 
the Hig 12 The Longhoms left still undefeat- 
ed, beating Ihe tats t5-I.V 15-11. l5-« 

Afkr taking a 3-1 lead m the first game, 
the Longhurns rallied to an it- J comeback. 
The Cats went on a 10-2 run that licd the 
game al 1 3, but they couldn't hang on 

In Ihc second game, the leams switched 
leading nix times Neither learn led hy nwre 
than two points until the sixth tie al 1 1 . 

In the third ganie, the l.tmghorns got con- 
trol eaflicf and rode the momentum of their 
previous two wins to finish at 1 5 -it. 

"We just had a break m momentum," 
Wieck said "When you don't have Ihc 
momentum, they c>n lake it away from you" 

Coach Jim McLaughlin said the Cats 
never had Ihe momentum 

"We gave them the fir«t game, the second 



game and the third game. " McLaughlin said 
"We gave them points. They didn't have to 
earn points " 

Service error* hampered the Cats' perfor- 
mance The Cats recorded 10 scrMce errors, 
of\en following a K- State sideout 

Junior right-side hittei Alexis Shepherd 
dug out nine halls and had a match-high 14 
kills Wieck had II) kills and 12 digs on the 
match. 

"We had some defensive hnltiance 
tonight, " Wieck said 'We were digging bolb 
out of nowhere It's something we've been 
working on, and we keep wanting to go up 
from here " 

But the blocking statistics Texas' 12 to 
K -State's six wcrcame the fact that the 
Cats led the Longhoms in kills, assists and 
digs. 

"Last night, we forced A&M to make 
errors,'* Wieck said on Saturday. "Tonight, wt 
just made mistakes. They didn't have to do 
anything." 

Moore said he was impressed, but nol sur- 

Sm VOUIYtAL^ Pog« • 




KIM ZSCHAU, K-SkM swing hitter, tpikei iht bait 
ogoirvst Teicoi Saturday night in Ah«arn Field fioute. 
Texoi won rbe molch 3-0, 



V 



■ • •■ ^' • -*,' 




AUEDnCM 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




DAILYcrossword 



ACROSS 
1 Collapsad 
S Company^ 41 Woody's 
• Brunatte ex 

12 Lolion 42 Sine-twn 
additive link 

13 Non- 45 Luau 
silence ot dance 
the lambs? 46 Criticize 

14 Opera solo disloyally 
ISSass 48 Book 

17 Hing« (on) before 

15 Remnant 



Lieber!' DOWN 
38 Give rise to 1 Notoriety 



19 Grass- 
hopper's 
rebuke r 

20 Hack- 
rwyed 

21 Sra , 
across the 
Pyrenees 

22 Whale 
group 

23 Pal ot 
Porthos 

26 Felt hats 

30 One of 
UoytTs 
sons 

31 Cartesian 
condition 

32 Bruins' 
base 

33 Oriental 

35 Detergent 
target 

36 Weeding 
tool 

17 •—du 
IT 



Obadiah 

49 Mamie's 
man 

50 Cattle 

51 Numbers 
racket 

52 Founda- 
tion 

53 Goblet 
feature 

Solution time: 27 mint. 



2 Carolina 
campus 

3 Clamorous 

4 Hindrarws 

5 Short loin 
cut 

6Fk]at 

lightly 
7 Lummox 
Sivy 

League 

school 
9 Extent 

10 Streamlet 

1 1 Sammy or 
Slubby 

16 Scenery 

chewers 

20Despon' 



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21 nmsy 

be In mint 
condition 

22 Jewel 

23 Copper 
head 

24'— and 
Sympa* 
thy- 

25POS 
sesses 

26Enthusi- 

BSt 

37 Nipper's 
CO., once 

28 Actress 
MacGraw 

29 — 
Antonio 

31 Dander 

34 A billion 
yearn 

35 Con 
game 

37 Lent a 
hand 

38 Fraud 
39C0UQar 
40Oodtos 
41 Put 

togathar 

43 The — 
Ftoader 

44 Attention 
oener 

46 Tucker's 
partner 

47 Sanctions 
W 




gTI HlUg^^Fof answers to loday's croMword call 
9 1 wRIr CUl 1-900-4544673' »C per nwtule.touch- 

lorw / rotary phones {16* only ) A Kirvfl Fealures sfvio. NYC 



10-28 CRYPTOQUIP 

DYVl FPZN AUPKZUN 

TZPDPZ CB VTPRH CIPYZ 

FKAKCYBRV VR DYRUKRH. 
Vesttrday's Cryptoquip; THE DETECTIVE HAD 
TO RETIRE BECAUSE HE DEVELOPED 
CLUESTROPHOBJA. 

Today's Cryptoquip clue: D equals F 



ADKoc 




Hot dance lessons crdEte TGn way meoil^ oBout Latino culture 



ciAUMni nurv 

The hot. rhythm it* moves of 
two popular Latin dtinccs arc 
being luught at K p.m each 
Sunday for a month iit Union 
Station 

Michael Bcnnelt. aLademic 
adviser for the College «f 
Archileelure, said he and partner 
Sara Saunders, !ieni()r in elemen- 
tary education, both use easy step 
patterriN and conlemporarv music 
to cniite beginners. 

"Wchave 

fun wiih ii 

as tvc 

teach," 

Iknncit 

said. 

"Dancing 

ofTcn* an 

immcdialc 

regard and 

sense of 

aceom- 

plishmeni 

because they arc learning and 

dancing by ihe end of the firsi 

hour." 

Bennett said Icssijns on danc- 
ing nierengue and salsa, also 
known as ihe ma mho, have been 
oHTered each fall since I1K4 in 
conjunct ion with Hispanic 
Awareness Month 

These dances are also among 
Ihe niHisi popular in Latin dance 



Lessons are 
oflercdal Kp.m. 
each Sunday 
until Nov. 16 
through UFM. 
Admission is 
SHI lor individ- 
uals and SI 5 for 
couples 



clubs. 

"These are Ihe current dances 
hcmg danced in Latin clubs in 
New York and Miami," Saunders 
said. "Its also a way to leam 
about Lalino culture " 

Saunders has 'taught with 
Arthur Murray m Kansas City, 
Mo, and has been Bcnneti's 
leaching partner since signing up 
for the lessons three years ago. 

"Merengue is extremely 
easy," Saunders said "Anyone 
•can Icam merengue, and you can 
always icll when a merengue is 
on because everyone is on the 
dance flwvr." 

Although lessons are a gt>od 
way to meet people, students can 
also sign up lor Ihe lessons v^ilh 
a partner 

"When dancing, people are 
ctKiimunication," Bennett said. 

Because dancing is a physical 
form of communication, partners 
figure oui the next step by read- 
ing signals from each other 

■'The gestures to lead and fol- 
low are very slight It's about sig- 
nals, eye contact, pressure on the 
skin and listening to the rh>ihm." 
Saunders said. "A man is lead, 
and it's his job to choreograph 
the dance spontaneously and it's 
the job of the woman lo follow 

which is an art form " 

When partners work logcthcr 
and read signals properly, the 




JiFr COOMa/Cdltg>af> 

ADRIAN BUSTAMAKTE, ielt, s«oia( m biobgy donees wiili Heidi Bolet 1997 K-Siaie graduate, ai salsa and 
meiengue lesiom Sunday night m Union Stotton sponsored by Union Program Council's Multicultural Committee 
Solsa oncj merengue lessons hove been oHered eacti fall since 1 989 m con|urKtion with Hitporac oworeness monlti 



result is beautiful. Bennell said. 

"Wc are ir>ing lo show ihai 
two people can citme together 
and move to music uigethcr and 
for a few mi notes, they can feel 
like movie stars." he said. 

All hough there arc usually 
more women than men at the 
lessons, each student will have an 
oppununiiy lo dance with st^me- 



one. 

"Dancing is an excel lent way 

to attract women Men just do not 
realize how imich women want lo 
have a man who dancc>. ' 
Saunders s.iid 

The majority of students w ho 
sign up for Ihe lessons have liille 
or no ballroom dancing experi- 
ence and the onK prerequisite is 



a willingness lo learn. Saunders 
said 

"Dancing, because it can look 
so Ix'auiilul or cxolic. looks hard 
It d>K.>nl have lo be hard It's lun 
.ind down to earth .ind imper- 
leci." Saunders said "We're lun 
training people to K' performers 
Dancing is casual and sometlimg 
people can do for pure fun " 



'Late Night' tries, but fails on music scene 



Review 



^ 



MATTKttn 

\ImU Hriici 

Now "Laic Night with 
Conan frBnen" fans 'c«n take 
a piece of the .shov^ anywhere 
they can carry a 
compact disc 

player. 

"Live from 
6A" is the luie- 
nighl talk show's 
latest try at market* 
ing lis growing popularity into 
more dollars for NBt 
Disinbuled by Mercury 
Records, the compact disc fea- 
tures some of ihe best musical 
performances lo appear »)n the 
show, according lo Ihe note 
inside the CD cover 

In reality, the CI) has more 
big names than great music. 

The disc gets off lo a rous- 
ing start with Ant Di^rancos 
November IW6 appearance 
wilh the song "Shameless" Her 
work's driving guitar backbone 
and vocals arc best described as 
a sharp compilation of top-of- 
the-line music While nol the 
hottest name in the music busi> 
ncss. Di^ranco knows how to 
get the audience excited about 




music. 

The CD then takes a sudden 
change of pace and moves to 
David Bowie's "Dead Man 
Walking." Yes. ihis was a popu- 
lar piece from a popular artist. 
but Ihe sudden change really ki\ 
me banging What's more, this is 
not one of Howie's greatest per- 
formances 

I was gratified to hear 
Matthew Sweet's "Do Ya." The 
upbeat rhythm and stronger per- 
formance did a good job of 
pushing me back in favor of the 
compibtion. Unfortunately, this 
was one of only a handful of 
gwKl songs on the CD 

Sweet was followed by 
Jamiroquai and the Swedish 
sensation Bjork. Circal, you 



say'? Nope, both 'When Vou 
(jonna Learn" and "Human 
Behavior," respectively, were 
played in 1993. Yes, the 
beforc-they-werc-stars music 
can be fun, but I prefer the 
more recent and just plain hct- 
ler music from these perform- 
ers. 

Hlvis Costello's "All This 
Useless Beauty" almost 
redeems the tone. I really 
enjoyed this melancholy piece, 
which represents some of his 
nicer work The piece was also 
better suited for a live perfor- 
mance on an enclosed stage 
where powerful guitar solos 
and hard-hitting vocals just 
aren't supported 

Having just come to that con- 



clu.sion. take's "Ihe Uislance" 
proved me partially wrong 
Their pow e r- p ac k ed 1 9*J(i 
recording was every hit as ga-at 
as the studio version released on 
the album Wow' 

tincc again, the CD listed 
two less than sjitislactory pieces 
Jonathan Richman's "let llcr 
tio Into I he Darkness" and Soul 
toughing 's "Soundtrack lo 
Mar>" jusi didn'l doit 

Scparaimg these two was 
Ldwyn t ollins' "A tiirl Like 
You" and 1 1 1's "1 Kiwn " Hoih of 
these pieces have been per- 
formed onstage so ollen that I 
wx>uld hope they could get it 
right by now While these were 
g(XKl pcrfonnances, 1 still would 
rather buv the albums. 



finally. Squirrel Nut Zippers, 
one of my atl-iime tavonte band 
iiaiiics. ended the disc with 
■(overs lane." This hand 
reminds me of tilenn Miller 
meets I4MK rock 'n' roll I jusi 
li.kl III lovi.* ii Iliiv w,i% probably 
I he one truly great song on the 
entile 1 1). 

frankly. I say buy the artists 
you like and forget the rest. 
t niess you're a seri»»us "Late 
\ighi " fan. ihis one isn't for 
vou the live perlonn.inces lack 
the luster of ihe studio versions, 
and the snippets ol audience 
cheering |usl couUln't make up 
for It 

O'Uncn quipped on the jack- 
et that he was excited to hear 
inieresi in releasing some of 
"I ate Night's" K'sl musical per- 
lormaiices until he found out ihe 
prtHlucers wanted the band ver- 
sions, nol his Maybe the disc 
would have been better if he 
had sung, or ai least recorded, 
some of the house band's work 

"frankly. 1 think we missed a 
golden opportunity," D'Bncn 
wrote in the jacket 

You're right on the money. 
toiian. 



Quartet's dynamic performance expresses intensity 



kljll li;(liiflk.r 



and 



Revisw 



Schubert, Mo/iirt 

Brahms would have 
been pleased with the 
performance given 
by the Artis tjuartel 
at K p.m. Saturday in 
McCain Auditorium. 

As the Austrian 
foursome presented works by 
these composers, a small audi- 
ence filling only the bottom tier 
of McCain cnjoyctJ Ihe intense 
interpretation of classical music 

Schubert's "f)verlure in C 
Minor, D. Ka" started the evening 
with an allusion of rippling 
waves The musicians embodied 



this image a.s the piece moved 
them to sway in their chairs to the 
slow- fast tempo The short 
strokes of the how sounded a 
playful nature intermixed with 
Ihe swelling, long strokes 

A similar theme was heard in 
Mofiin's "Quartet in D Major, K 
499 Hofrmeisier" The frolick- 
ing trill notes and triplets 
expressed the merrincss of the 
piece, which was later interrupt- 
ed b\ .1 vharp contrast of dynam- 
ics diiil I he suave undertones of 
the cello This gave the piece 
darkness and offered more dcplh. 

The four movements of this 
piece elicited emotions of cheer, 
sorrow and humor In the second 



movement, the cello schemed lo 
respond to the questions of ihe 
two violins and viola This seri- 
ous tone was then ciinirasted in 
the fourth mtwcment with chop- 
py strokes of energy and rising 
and falling cascades of triplets 

With the completion of the 
MoMrt piece, a stiff silence fol- 
lowed the last draw of the h(>w 
The performers, with their btm s 
still in the air, sat fro/en in the 
movement of the piece, as did the 
audience 

To complete the evening, ihe 
quartet performed its finest 
musical interpretation: Brahm's 
"Quartet in f Minor. Op 5 1 . No 
I " From deep tones rose a llurry 



of note's between the lour tn.stru- 

menis Ihe first movemeni com- 
bined an agnaied plucking and 
abrupt long strokes 1 his abrupt- 
ness was quieled in the sc*cond 
miTvcmcnt with a uniform legato 
The final two movements of 
the piece expressed a restlessness 
of passion Propelled by vigor 
and emotion, Ihe musicians near- 
ly rtise lo their leet in the linal 
healed mnvcmeni ( cllisi 
ttihmar Muller riK'ked his cello 
in sychrom/ation with his sway- 
ing head Violinist IVtcr 
Schuhmayer often rested his ear 
on his violin as if lo belter led 
the piece With this same intcnst- 
ly, the performers finished with 



four bow s risen high in the air, as 
if to honor Hrahms 

The Artis Quartet not only 
enicriained with lis dynamic 
interpretaiion but also with its 
physical perltirniance Bouncing 
eye contact served as a 
meironome througlioui the per- 
liirmance The dyn.iniics were 
detcMed in the volume of the 
piax' and also with the musi- 
cians' raised eyebrows ,ind dis- 
cerning facial eipiessions 

Ihe classical inlerpteiatiotis 
and pcrlormance style of the 
\rtis tjuarlel evoked a new 
respc'ct liir Ihis Viennese quartet 
and classical music in 
Manhattan 



NUMBER9 



DILBERT 




ALICE, rvt NOTICED A 
OtSTURBtNG PATTERN. 

YOufl> soLurroNS to 

PROOLEMS fcRE ALWAYS 
TWt THINGS VOU TRy L_ASr. 




. 



UJITM 


ALL DUE RESPECT, 


ARE VOU 


USiisiG '^UR 


SKULL 


TO 


STORE OLD 


RAGS 


OR 


WHAT? 



ITS A GOOD THIMG 
VOU SAID "WITH ALL 
OUE RESPECT " J 




r- v^ rr"r -t-T-^ 



*■ if- f»F*l>»»-^i»«*«^ ,»»*if 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



MONDAY, OCTOiirt 27, 1997 



THE 
CALENDAR 



MONDAY, OCT. 27 

roOTBAU 

• Packers ot Polrioli, 8 p.m. on 
ABC 

TUESDAY, Oa. 28 

KSTATI 

• SpoflsTol, 5-6 p fn on KSDB-FM 
9 1 9, guejl caller Kevtn Lockett 
of the Konsas City Chielt 

HOCKfY 

• Sobrei ol Avalanche, 7 p.m. on 
ESPN 

WEDNESDAY, OG. 29 

K-STATE 

• Tennis, Rolex fiegionol 
Chompionshtps Ol Omoha, Neb. 

B0WUN6 

• PBA Ebonite CKollenge, 
6:30 p.m. on ESPN 

THURSDAY, OCT. 30 

K-STATE 

• Flight Nighl wilK Dick Vitale, 8 
p m. ot Bfomloge Coliseum 

• Tennis, Rolex Regional 
Chompionshtps at Omoho, Neb. 

COUEGf FOOTBAU 

• North Corolina ol Georgia Tech, 
7 p.m on ESPN 

• Woshbtirn a\ Emporio Slote, 7 

p.m. on PBS 
TINNtS 

t Ports Open, noor on ESPN 
OOLf 

• Tour Championship, 2pm on 
ESPN 

FRIDAY, Oa. 31 

K-STATE 

• Volleyboll at Texos Tech, 7 p.m. 

• Tennis, Rotex Regional 
Championships ol Omoho, Neb. 

TENNIS 

• Pons Open, 1 1 o m. on ESPN 
OOLF 

• Tour Chompionihip. 2 p.m. on 
ESPN 




IGOR TEREKHOV, 

i|t()dijijtt' iiudent in 
pliy.ics. dives lo' 
iioll during o table 
tennis match a' 'he 
Cheiier E Peiefs 
Recreoltoti Complex 
'jolurday evetving 
leiekhov was a 
potticipant in itie 
Inter national 
Cootdtnoling Council 
Olympics over the 
weekend 

MANOONWHITt 



Game 



CONriNUED FROM PAGE 6 

liriinuiicu villi k' couM luvc kkkcJ 
Ihc Kill iTutrt jkmcrTully, hiil tlut iluln't 
liiiist ihf error 

lnMf.uL II was ilw Kt-h mpit sinith- 
vvi'M wiml 

■"I .iinial lur ilic ritslit upriylu." he 
s.iid "Hui It drilled mitre thiin I ihoti^lu 
It WlHlId " 

Ok In III mu lixtk mer imJ ;; a tiled a 
rifsl dim 11 on j fuee mask penally, but 
punted the Kill Kiek lit ihe ( als. (^tm 
eiininuik'd aunt ha inisiaki.' .tmi kepi 
ptitnts nil rile Kiard 

Daud Allen lieliled Sixvnet punier 
Hrian ShaLkeir»rd'> piinl at the K -Slate 
live-yard line. ,iiul almitst set his second 
speeial-leanis remfd in iwu weeks 

llebntytiht the Kill hack t'ora wnuld- 
be record '*3 yards and a inuehdowti 
Hw a hiitdin|! eall brought the hall baek 
III the K-Siaie si* 

l.asi week. .Mk'ii returned six punis 
for IC5 yards, a K-Slate reeiird 

"You run thai tor a score aiul then 
you you turn around and they take il 
buck llV a Icldown." he fiaid 

Bui ill IcoikhfeflMlMliMttt^liUttine 



last week ajiamsi Texas .Ai^M. he 
could have have liaJ tuo loiichdov^ns. 
but the Ajjjiics' punier matk" satrf-sav- 
iii^; tackles 

"There v^a.s no v*ay t was gonna let 
ihe kicker i;ei me," .Mien said 

Alkr the ball \*as brought back lo 
their si\. ihe tats couldn't score ami 
traded punis wrih the Sinmers. pbyinf: 
lo a seoieless tirsi qua tier 

tt itii 1 ZS into the second i)uarter. 
liramaiiea made up for his previous 
tniss by nailing a J 7-yard lield goal 
atienipi to give tlie I atsa .'-O lead a lead 
they never surrendered 

K- Stale's ilelense protected the lead 
Ky onlv allnvviiig I > yards on live plays 

I he ( ats scored on the ensuing drive 
lo lake a lll-O lead, v^hich ihey earned 
into halltiine 

The Sooners opened the second halt 
with a l2-play.7|-yatdiouehdown drive 
lo ehise the gap to 111-7 

Hut K -State scored on tbree of its 
next Tour possessions, putting the game 
ontot'rcaeh 

K -Male's nuinbcts weren't overly 
imprcsMvc. but the I uls did pick up one 
V ictory and no losses. 

"It lecls good lo vt in Period," run- 
ning back Ttic Hiekson said. 



Sooner 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

been At>rking with hini and had planned 
to get him involved iiKtay Me came 
through lor us I le made a lot ol gintd 
things happen lor 



us and made a lot 
ol people miss," 
ft lake Slid 

"We lia\e a 
young team that's 
been tlirough a 
loi lie gave u^ a 
lilt today Tlie 
players rallied 
.iround him and 
fie really gave the 
otlense a btKisi 
Brandon vmII 
remain an impor- 
lani pan ot our 
otVense and we'd 

like lo have hiin go out and do things 
nghi otTihe hat" 

I veil tliough fllake brought Daniels 
m. he still vveni hack to MtH)re and 
Tuente. Olten. fie sv^iichcd during dri- 
ves, rotating the quarterbacks alter each 
play. 

Each quart eitiaek had a difTereni 
style Moore eould pass, but v»as more 



<•(# 

Th*i( kifge omounls oJ 
wbdilvliont mode tl 
fiord fof ui <o gel 1^ 
appropriate pkjy 
calked If lf>«y would 
hove substihjied quoi 
lerbocki eorliei m iHe 
^me it wouM hove 
been mofe effective 

locAoll cooch 




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sutecsstul al eseeuiing the option 
Tuenic rusfied ihiee times and lost live 
yards, but was cight-ol'-IJ passing Tor 
IIMI yards 

Daniels didn't thnvw the ball at all 
hui was able lo lead ilie Sooners down 
Ihe lield 

fie look control al Ihe end ot a first- 
fiaft drive and led Oklafioiiia lo a sec- 
ond-aivd-goal situulion Inwii k-Stalcs 
Ihtce-vatd line 

ftut Moore came in and liimblai. 
ending die threat 

The rotation caused problems Tot the 
Cats, but not enough, as k-Stale vum 

:(i-7 

"Then laige amounts ol sulvsiiiitiums 
m.ide II h.ifd lor us lo gel ihe i>pproprt- 
aic play called" Snyder sjul •It iliey 
would have substiuited ijiianeifiacks 
earlier in the game it vvinilil have been 
more elTeeiive " 

.-Mlliough Daniels hadn't played nn 
otVense yel this season, fie was prepared 
to .And jitdeint; by Ins numbers, he 
might get another crack al tt 

"t oaeh (lllakel came lo me lo see il 
I would make ihe sv*itch to quarterback, 
just in case out oifier two got hurt I |usi 
v%anl«d lo do whatever helps ibe leani." 
Daniels said "I Tell com Ion able overall 
I was nervous al first hut alter a Tevv 
plays I Teh better II was tun" 



Volleyball 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

prised, by the Cats' tenaeious perfor- 
mance 

"I knew they 'd play real well." Mintre 
s lid "fjoth teams 

4W 

I knew ifiey d pby red 
«reil Both leaini icve 
and Hod leal well and 
it J lind of ugfy volleyboll 
when both teomk serve 
ond biocli teal well 

• JimMeere 

raile^ coach 



setve and block 
leaf well and it's 
kind ot ugly vol- 
leyball wficn 
birlb te.inis serve 
and hh^k real 
«cll " 

The higger 
lc\as le.im's 
blocking didn't 
iniimuliile itie 

t .lis, 

Mclaughlin 

satd 

"They're big. 
,iiid lliey get ovet tlie net," Vtelaughhn 
said 

"We were nut id system We were 
selling balls over big two-person 
hlitcks ' lie said 

Moore didn't talk to his e\ -pi avers 
attet Ihe niatch, say ing he'd Icfl it up lo 
them lo decide 

"It's hard bc-ing baek." Moure said 
"I'm glad It's over" 







m 




P_ 








Moncliiy 

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KANSAS STATE COUEG I AN 




MONDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1997 



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rnr^nit> with walar/ Ira^h 
paid LAurrdrv facilinm lo 
calad ofv i^itrr Kitd^an com 
pieiR wrih ntnvv. lelrig 
eralor. and diahwaahnr 
Don'lwaiir CallMDI 
7J6 3S04 



I Bedrooms Firsi 
Montli I REt 

( aW lor d.iily 

^[H'ti^l ■ liniiicit 

mimlHiS.W 29S1 



NOW LEASING Hn.. t» 

piri**^ tlf*^1^r^^ ml ,l|i,irt 

iTWfilb' hiuisvb TtffAr KSLJ 
$775 In 1650 AHIanca 
Propartv Marwgafnani 
ft30^3B7 

OCTOBER AVAILA6ILIIV 
al lOtK Blueninnl Avrr 
Onit bodmoni. i3fl5' 
ntonrh Walpr antl \tm\\ ih 
paid. Ckiaa In Larnpua Call 
MOI77S^3804 

ONE BEDflOOM APART 

ME NT avMilrtblv inirnH 
dirttfily J lift acroma I ha 
Hinder Irorr^ canipiia al 1807 
Colltigv Hnigtila, t395/ 
inttiilh. Stova. rafiigaiator. 
and divihwashnr includcHi 
WAtfir amt traah pawl 
Lannrliy ta<:iliiicia lof-.aieri 
on titit Call MDI In viawt 
776 3M04 

IHBEt FIVE BEDROOMS 
Ona block lo camput 
Nawly rciriuH$«led Mual 
nvfl tti Iwlinv*' All iha 
amartitim Reatonabla 
itinl 539 4641 

I WO THREE BED 
ROOMS Oita btrK* lo cam 
put Vary nica ^ith all 
rifriifiiittaft Raaaonabia 
I mil 539 4641 

TWO BEDROOM APAR1 

ME NT Willi in talking dia 
laiMTv nt KSU Availahla 
now I 1076 Oingn. 1495/ 
month Watnr and traah 
paid Stova, latiigaratrM. 
iind dlfthwaahar CatI MDI' 
»7B-3(W4 

LtNIVERSITVCOMMONS, 
Iwcv tHirlf[}OiTiii, ona batti 
foi aprlng aarnaater aub 
laaM, SS73/ month Call 
565 OtHI 

UPMVSmrTVTfllllACS 
AnkPrTMENTS Lnasiiig 

|t<)i full III iiLiirilrml. larga 
Iwo anil ihrcfl Iwdroorr* 
apartniant* Willi waahrti, 
dryar h(ioliu|ta Pi ml SS7* 



IKii month, flvailabis im 
nmdifttely. Shod term 
laaaa ok. Water and traati 
paid Has dlihwaaher and 
on iita latindry Calf tor 
and apiKiintmanl MDI 
776 3«04 



For Ront- 
Heusos 



12TMA BLUEMONT. 

NiLO Ihiwo iwdriiom 
tiouco FREE wnsher/dry 
PI trnnt t),ii* p^rctwa Wa 
ivi iirttih piiiii Ona bkxlt 
to campua. S50Q 
HT'WOa »i ITSSI263- 
3S16, U'Hvii nii'SSII^Ii' 

AVAIL A BEL SECOND HI 
mastfii. fiiui hedra«n>. 
twi> liattv oti airaat park 
Hiy large ^laiaga Ouiel 
an^ clean campus rinse, 
pet cnnsirternd. S37-B389 

BRICK hlOME. new carpal, 
painl. thine or four tied 
roomi Mitti two bath 
runins. KitchDii Appliancea. 
palio. encloKcd yard, close 
lo campii*. 539 1177 

FOL7R BEDROOM HOLJSE. 
915 H ttlti aiiiH>t, no pal*. 
itvailable lirai of January. 
$700 539 4J77 

HOUSE FOR rent at 1130 
Pomaroy Four brntionrii. 
two bath, wilh study 
SBOQi mcinlli trash paid 
CIrisri lo campus. Waat>ar/ 
Dryai tiu<i^iips No pals 
Call UOI 776 3804 

Must SEE Itiis Ihrne txid 
room house Two bath 



2 Bedrooms for 
the Price of I 

Imittcit niiinbtr Icll 
call ^y^-Vi^X 



WAl K TO carnpiisl Two 
tjfldrnom apartment Incat 
ad at 1113 Baniand, tSOO 



lull finiBlitid tjaiidinpnl 
S&;^ Call S39 3<»8 or 
7 16 4839 Iwtuie 5p in . ask 
till Ja&ciii 

TWO BE DHOOM, ONE 
txith. washer.' dryer, air 
ciindilioixHt. Clrjaa lo carr^ 
puB Braiirt nnw S40D plus 
ulilitn-s t1J9Ctallui 
539 H673 til |7BSI(I4! H473 



For Sols- 

Mobllo Momos 

t4X50 TWO BEDROOM, 
many irnprovnvarils. newly 
reilet orated, new an can 
ditionni. westiar^ dryar. 
shad Close lo campus, 
S9S00 or bail nitaf , 
587 9584 

VERY NICE iwotwdroom 
twn tialtr New living rrxKn 
carpet All electric, central 
air Andnr^nn Realty 776 
4834 ui Sliniun nt 77S 7903 

14S| 

Roommato 
Wontod 

S^Wl/MONTHplusinna 
tniidti ul lilt let: walk lo 
campus; very clean; water/ 
Until pntil, rtepoati ra 
r|uii«d; 537 8785: wee 
I>nii<ls532 4941 

FEMALE HOOMhtATE 
needed fni second lemes 
tnr ClnMi to campus 
Waiar ,tnd ir ash tiaiJ 
6«7 9356 

FEI^ALE ROOMMATE 
neetled for apartmeni nent 
teniesler, Jaiuiaiv July 
Nic* anvil onriHtnt anil 
friaridty looiTinialei ianu 
Wi lent IS Irw 
mk»92134«k»u.edu 
565 9439 

f e MALE ROOMMATE i<> 

share clean, nicn two bert 
room Hpadn^nnl. Ctusato 
campus plus AuyiRville 
S750 plus one hall utilities 
Doiidre, 537- 1793;' S33 
60et 

FEMALE RtXIMMATE 
wantad to aiibleaio Uni 
varsity Conimorit Apart 
rifani Rent S750' month 
pint r>iu> lourth ulilllies 
Available mi rl Decern twi 
August Call 776 6981 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wantod to itiata ttim Iwrt 
rcHim, iwo balt^ duplan. 
one blorA from campua. 
Celt 53B 8494 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted, Wuudway Apart 
menis SJ65 a mtinlh plus 
one halt biiis. luase uiiiil 
June 1998)13031751 1641 

FIRST MONTH and One 
liatl Iran fraaKSUpadi 
ing per ml I Ouial. vary 
nice apart mant. Move in 
finattwaak January, 
93H977 

hiON SMOKING ROOM 

MATE lor raapontible 
mala. Laundry, cable. 1140 
plus iititiliat 539-1468 

ROOMMATE WANTED tor 
tMK^badroorn housa Ncwi 
•maftaf- tZ30 par monttv. 
Wtaar/tfaah paid. ZM 776 

7M3 

ROOMMATE WANTID- Be 
ginning Oacembar. 10 
sham iwij bedroom, hwo 
bath trailer Walnut Qiova, 
Bin miles Eaal of Manhal 
tan. f ISO a inonlti ptut one 
halt iitititiet Water/ trash 



paid Small peta ottay 
Amanda or Debbie 
t7fl5)494-»74 



Subloooo 

AVAILABLE IMME 
DIAIELV, ono bedroom 
Apartment 137&' month 
plus gas *n^ electric. 
Close to campust CatI 
'76 5135 

FEMALC ROOMMATE 

IN ANTED ti< take ovei 
Liiiisii 17&a/ month plus 
Linn tt^iid utilities Three 
bedrooms and two baths 
Close to camput Call 
776 9461 

SUBLEASERNEEDEDI 
Room available in tour 
tiedrooni houae. very close 
to campus. Washer and 
dryer 1015 Clanm Call 
Jessica. 539 1878 or 539 
1739 

TRAILOR HOME bedroom 
Female, non smoker 
January May tTOO a 
month plus one Iturd ulili 
he* Call Michelle 
776-0504 




SERVICE DIRECTORY 



2101 



Rosutno/ 



539 5998 FOR all lyping. 
ndilirrg, prodI reading, 
larw I r en script on. Ipapart 
Itiutit. ditsertation, bcxjfc*, 
resumes, coverletterst 30 
plun years enperience 

NEED SOMETHINO 
TVW07 ) II tyiw piipurs 
lor SI imr double spaced 
page I can also type 
letumat Chooaa ona ot 
my tlylas for 115 I'll cieala 
your Biyie tor 170 Call 
Wanda al 537 0774 7 3D 
a in 3 30 P ni ui leave 
voice mail 

21S| 



Dosktop 



SEIKO COLOftPOINT Dye 
Sub comlHi AaH ttiermal 
color prinlsi Newiiiboa. 
Never used 17995 Lists at 
18000 Call 776 5999 



MuBlclano/OJs 

FRATERNITIES, SORORI 
TtES. Srudant Ort^nifa 
nuns, and Clutie Book the 
beat atidio and visual Disc 
Joctiav show available 
C&C Ennrgv lias the high 
est quality lighting and 
•ounri un the market to 
day 3000 waits of power 
lealuting the moet eurreni 
muiic raieeiwi Coittpaii 
tiva prices call 
1316)497- 1571 and leave 
message tor a prica quota 

Autemotlvo 
Wopotr 

AUTOCRAFT 701B Service 
Circle twhiiid WalMart 
Specialifing in Nissan Dai 
aun. Honda, Toyota, Sub 
aru, Hyundai and Ma/da 
537 5049 



Ottior 
Sorvteos 



COMPREHENSIVE MAJOR 
Madical Coyerage lui short 
or conrinuouB tarrris tor 
niiiin iiitnrmalion call 
539 6949 

LOSE ITS MOM 
WflOMT... and 48^. more 
tar< Pyruvate has 75 years 
clinicat testing il a ma|or 
US Medical School Prov 
en lo hxe more weight 
faster and liaap if olft All 
nalural, sale Call 888 839 
9888 



aaa 



EMPLOYMENT/CAREERS 



Molp Wontod 



ManKanad City OrtM- 
naitca ASIA aaauras 
every peraon atfual op- 
portunity In eeourtno 



n»ant in any field of 
worh or latior fv>r wftic4l 
^Mi alia it pro|>*rtv qualF 
f lod r*9ardl«as of raoa, 
eea. milttary statu*, dle- 
BMKty. religion, aga, 
eolOT, national <»ri«ln or 
•neaatry Violation* 
ahould IH raponad t« 
ItM Diractof of Human 
flaeourcat al CKy Hall, 
B>7-«0S«. 



Tit* Co H esler* catwMt 
verity th* financial ptH 
lantial ot advartisa- 
monta in the f mploy- 
rrrant/Caraar ctasafflca- 
lion. Readers m99 ad- 
vised to •pproaeh any 
audt employtnoni op- 
portunity witli reason^ 
able caution- Tlia Col- 
la g len urgas our road- 
•r* to Gorttact tfio Sat- 
tor Bueinas* Butoati, 
901 SE iofferson.To- 
paka, NSOeSOT'tlBO. 
ISTSI2M-0464. 

17100 HOUR Our lop let 
esala* r»t)* make thai 
much and mnrei We alto 
offer benefit*- intirle emt 
oultida (waitions, paid lam 
irtg. and opportunity lor 
•dvanceinani We pmm 
ote latent fron> within the 
organfalion. We are seek 
ing five individual* to till 
position* Itiat tiavi^ oiHined 
due 10 growth We have 
full and pert tinw |)osilions 
avaitabt* CalM913t 
493-T7M aililorMr Mil 
Ion. 

11500 WEEKLY polantial 
mailing our circtilars No 
EKperience Required Free 
information packet Call 
410 783 8777 

1600* WEEKLY tU per 
envelope Send sell ad 
dressed stamped envel- 
ope GMA. PO Bo* 13486. 
Allarila,Geoigia30374 E 
mail GEN MAR 
KETigianlroni 

ADMINISTRATIVE AS- 
SISTANT: Aclininiilialivfi 
ataistant needed tor tasi 
[>aced const ruclHin office 
in the Manhattan/ Fi Riley 
area ataniiig Dncamtier 
1997 Mu*t be able to 
work independently and 
well wilh onhart General 
duties include Typing cor 
reapondence, reports, con 
traci*. etc , Payroll, Invoic 
as, Meintaining charA 
tmoti. certified payroll, an 
Bwermg phone*, filing and 
purcftaaing tuppties for the 
office Enperience in Mi 
cro*oftWindow*95, Lotus 
173MndAS400aplii9 Sal 
ary commenturate with en 
panence Please *niMl re 
*ume lo M A Moiteiitton. 
PO Bo> 1546. Columbia, 
MO 65705, Ann Dale Hel 
ai 

ARRANGE YOUR Spring 
semealei |ob now tCaw 
Valley Green houae . Inc is 
interviewing maw to Mart 
in Dat^emtier. Jaiiuary cii 
FalKusry Enioyabiework 
atmoaphara. competitive 
pay and opportunity CatI 
775 8585 belwaen 3 00 and 
4 30p m 

BASE PLUS COMMIS 
S10N First year earnirvgs 
can exceed S45-000 First 

month ear ning* can 
eicwed l400Ot We ate Im 
lune 500 company grow 
mg l(X:elty in taiiexa We 
are eeeking talented intli 
viduats to fill posKionB m 
our sales department We 
otter 119.000 177,000 
lusa. waakiy Lommitsions. 
no travel, full twneflls. op 
portunily for aihiniice 
menil Ityou aia nitaiesad 
in mora in formal ion oi 
wduld like a phone inter 
view please call 19131 
497 8780 end ask tor Ken 
ny 

CANtMETALNr Want a 
pan lime |ub Itial pays full 
time7 Want a gum iintned 
hourly wage, plus lionue 
M7Than call met M F, 
1pm 9pm . 567 4114 atk 
for Sharon 

COMPOTf R INf ORMA 
TKIN SiHKialitl (f 3041. Pan 
or Full lime, temporary po 
til ion, not lo earead 17 
nuirtth*, in Ihe Oepaitinent 
Of Agronomy BS degrae 
in computer science plus 
■J* month* enperieiKe with 
C*r. Viiual Basic, and 
Window* 31, '95 Knowl 
edge of forage manege 
mant ancV or cow calf pro 
dudion ayafema hntpfut 
but not required Send lei 
ter of application, reaume- 
Ir enter ipts. end ariange loi 
three leHert of ralatence to 
be sent to. Dr Gerry L. 
FHialer. Head, OepadmenI 
of Agronomy. Thtockmor 
Ion Plant Science* Center, 
Kansas Stale University, 
Manhattan. KS 66506 5601 
Application deaitllne Oc 
lobei 79. 1997 KaiiBaa 
Slate Univeitily it en Al 
firmalive Action; artual op 
portunity employer. KSU 
encourage* divamly 
among it* employaes. 

EARN FREE TRIPS a 

CASH1 CLASS TRAVEL 
naada tturlenlt to promote 
Spring Break 19981 Sail 15 
trips lb iraval treei Hlohly 
ItwUwatMl atudanta ean 
•ant a li** trip ft aver 
S1O.000I Choose Can 
cun. Bahamas. Maratlan. 
Jamaica, or fioi Ida! Noith 
America' t Itrgeat *tui}enl 
tour operatori Call Notyl 
1400 838 6411 



HCLP WANTtD.. 

Wonian aain 1450 plus 
weakly aB*an'ibling circuti 
tmardv component* el 
fioma. EitparlarK^a \mtm * 
caeeary, wit train Imme- 
diele opening your locel 
araa Call 1 l«70)4»3-7983 
Ell M6S8, 



PART TIME WORK tor col 
lege student* Make your 
rrwn schedule Earn up lo 
150 1700ii per wveli Prov 
en reaume builder for all 
mainrs Scholarships, in 
rui ships. CO op* availatrle 
Ci.iiiditinns aptily Worti in 
Manhattan Iniarview al 
personnel office inTopeke. 
Cell 1785)778 1144 M F 
17 4pm 

TEMPORARY PART TIME 
and weekend help nee d e d 
for tiirniturt delivery 
Pleese apply in person at 
Homestead Rental. 7337 
Sky Viie Lane One block 
south of Holiday Inn Noli 
dome 

THOROUGH HOUSE clean 
ing tor couple with no pets, 
smoking, children FleRit>lo 
*chadule Ad|acen| io cam 
■HIS Respond with letlei 
anil tiualiticahont to Col 
legian ho* 1 

LrriLrTY biluno co- 
ordinator: Cilyol 
MiiiiImti^ii* KniiMf* ijiopu 
latioiv 44.0001 IS c III rentley 
seeking to till a Regulai 
Full lime position of Utility 
Billing Cooidinatoi Start 
ing Salary 19 71' houi 
(OOQI. ptd* eicnlleni ben 
efit* Thi* position can 
Inbutei lo the operation of 
the Customai Service Ot 
fice by atsisiing tite Ciis 
tomer Service Supervisor 
in the overall coordination 
ot lire utility lulling opera 
Hon BflchBlors degree in 
p>ul>lic adminislralion. btiai 
ness adrTMnistration. man 
eiHfmpni iki nuniing. or re 
laKKl fmid pruterieil How 
ever, relevant experience 
ri>av be sutMlituled fur ^ 
ucalion Expeiionce Hi 
f^'B and mini coinputert 
IB required Experience in 
cuilomer relation* i* lie 
*irable Enpnriencem *u 
fjeivisiori It niao desiiable 
A complele |ob desirripliori 
indicating knowledge, skill 
and alnlitint is available bv 
leriueBt A|>pty al the De 
padnient iit Human f^e- 
soiircirt too Manhattan 
Tr>wn Center. Suite 516. 
Manhnltan KS 66607. no 
liiliii ihtiii TiiHKitay. Oclob 
or 78 1997 liy 5 OOp m 
EOE MF'QID 

Bkislnosa 
OpportunlUos 

Tito CoWaBlan earuKM 
varlty the financial po- 
ienlial of advert tae- 
ment* In iHe Employ- 
ftkant/Caraor olaaallica 
lion. Raadart are ad- 
vised to approadi any 
audi businas* opfKir- 
tuntty with reaaonabia 
caution. The Collegian 
tiro** our roadors to 
comact tin Batter Susl- 
naaa Bureau, 601 SE 
Jaffa raon. Tope ka, KS 
OftOO? 1190 
<»13I233-4I4««. 

EARN MONEY and FREE 
TRIPS 1 1 Alisu lute Best 
SPRING BREAK P^kages 
available 1 1 iNDtVIDUAlS 
Stiidoi.l ORGANIZATIONS, 
or small GROUPS want 
erPi Call INTER CAMPUS 
PROGRAMS al 1 800 
377 6013 or 
hii(i /'www cipt com 




410 



Itoms fof Solo 

IMS ROVAL PURPtEl 
Porch e*e ona toilay. 
Slop by 103 Kadilo. 
Buy r»o«* for only 
•1A.BS. 

ANTIQUES COtLECTI 
BLES. toots, iHitrks furni 
tiiie- estate |irwelty. beer 
aigns. thousanrl* of curi 
ou* good* Time Machine 
AiiHdue Maul aiut Ftea 
Ma dial 4910 Skyway Or 
between Brigga and •ir' 
port 539 4684 



HAV[AN1DEAF0R 

Halloween? 

Grandma'! Trunk 

has a lot ol clotho* 

and odd* and endi 

to plelt Iroai. 



Thrift Shey 
■ »»* Plllakwy Dr. 



CABLE OE SCRAMBLER kit 
111 96 See alt ihe preini 
um and pay per view chan' 
nets IB00I757-1389 

COOK BOOKS Vintage li 
cent* lags, ancyclope<ti«'t. 
bladi memorabilia, chuidi 
windows, oriental fiimrltir 
and potery. Vintage maga 
rinat, books, raliguous, 
hats, radio*, clock*, auto, 
tool*, cameras, album* fur 
niture, potery, aatatn lew 
airy, American heritage 
books, movie atill*. tavern 
stuff, bras*. Itunkt. mili 
lary. tin*, stems. 50' s furni 
lura. flute, prints, floor 
lamps new car trailer 
11499. new Sx 9 lilt trailier 
1599 8000 Square feet ol 
curious goods. Tinw Ma 
china Antique and Flea 
Madisl 4910 Skyway Dr 
between aiipoii and 
Briggs. Visa, MaaterCard. 
layaway 539 4664 open 
17 00)1 rn 5a{tpmTuet 
day Ihiu Saturday 

K STATE niRni or 

ooLDOLrmii luo 

txuirni llrurtis. 17^ itiuiTi 
you haul oamptes 785 
843 1605. lorcad«#ixim 
pusarva.corti 

SELLING AIL my oil painl 
ing stuff Sortie new. some 
u*sd Celt 776 5999 

WWWSUPERIOflA 

CURACOMVIEWouren 
tire line ul new AMD pre 
owned Arura't Ask for Pa 
trick J Sleiner il rated 
Acurs web site in Iha na 
tioni 

41B| 

Furnttur* to 
■wy/Soll 

JERRY'S WHOLESALE 

CARF^ Carpet lemiianlH 
and vinyl remnams 504 
Yuma Monday Friday. 
8r30a-m - & 30p m Sat 
Ba m.- Tip m Open to the 
public 

4N| 



Coiwputors 

MONITOR REPAtR quidi 
mid laliable service Free 
pick up and deiiveiy Call 
Inland 776-0311 



Ttekotsto 
Buy/Soil 



Pots and 
Syppllos 



BABY UMBRELLAS, Slue 
and gold Macaws, Hahnns 
Macaws, sweel. fun. cuddly 
rare Love Birds, CrxdiahloB, 
539 1177 



4W| 

Sporting 
SqulpmonI 



GOVERNMENT SUR 
PlUSi' Camoullage tlolh 
irig, boots, rainweai. wool 
clothing Ai*o CARHARTT 
WORK WEAR Monday 
Friday 9am 5:30pm Sat 
II I day 9a m 6pm SI 
Maiya Surplus Sahn- St 
Marys, Kansas, 1795)437 
7734 

4M| 

Storoo 

Bqiilpmoirt 

ALPINE CO changer model 
6970 Like iww U» 4068 



SELLINGFOUHKSU KU 
toottiall lidtelt Taking 
besi offer by October 3t. 
Call 13161497 1571 and 
leave message with an oil 
« Seala are located in Ihe 
noith end /one. general ad 
mission 

TICKETS WANTED KSU- 
Coioraito fiKitball ganin 
Sludenl section or ottiei 
Wilt t>uy oite or hivo Call 
cotled (7851331 7031 
lOam Bpm or 1 785)811 
5394 9pm 10am 



IK STATE VB 

Colorado lidiets Will tiuy 
any number of tickels Cell 
cotled (913) 879 7350. as* 
lor Mftiy 




Autontobllot 



1979 FORO LTD slalion 
wagon 637 7877 after 
5p m Use for hunting, 
tithing and tnilgete picnici 

1985 MUSTANG GT con 
vsrtible ciistomifad Too 
many now pad* to list. 
Must seel S5500 or best 
iiftei 587 9771 

TWO SETS OF WHEELS 
FOR SALE UX6r«intni 
lines with Forg spinners. 
15X8 tKilisherl three Btai 
Ainaiican Eagles Call 
Brandon. 537 9850. even 
ings 



9301 



ilotofcycloB 



1989 NINJA 600R Jetla<l. 
ciisloin (IIP49S. tiia. exlia* 
Runs gieal. 11850 or best 
offei 539 8975 

1994 KAWASAKI N>n|a 
750 Black, purple 
665 0747 

FOR SALE Yamaha 1997 
Srvca, red sharp. 12999 or 
beet oHei 539 0793 



wm 



TRAVEL/TRIPS 



Spring 
Sroak 



SPRING BREAK 'OS- Me 
/alien with College Tiiur* 
All tare, seven night* hotel. 
lrBn*tart. |uiti*t For 
l>rochuie o^ earning FRCE 
trip I 800 395 4896 
(www col legal our* comi 

SPRIfM SREAK SS' Free 

tciod rti>d dunks' Cancun, 
Bahama* Jamaica ami 
Florida IrrHiv 1399 Otgan 
i;a a tmati group and tiav 
el free! Higheat coriiniis 
iions and lowest (Hiresi 
Call Surf 8i SunTuuis to 
tHTComa a campu* lupie 
tentative (8001574- 7577 

••SPRING BREAK 'Take 
7-" Hiring flepti Sell 15 
Take 7 Free Hottamt Desti 
nation*! Free Parti«* EdI* 
and Dunk* SunSptaih 1 
800 476 1 1 10 



'f^^t 




ffiMf Li#e 



with the 
Collegian 

classifieds 



COLLEGIAN 




CUSTOMERS 

advertise in the dassifieds 

*v\rMM\>i r*i*i'l>. I ;« ti.i .I'.i.i vm 



CbssiftedRATES 
1 DAY 

20 lewdl Of htl 
17 15 

foch word OYw 20 
(.20 p«t word 

2 DAYS 

20 wiyds or Imi 
JMO , 
•ocK yvord ov*r 20 
$25 pw word 

3MYS 

20 wofdi 01 l«it 
J9 45 

«xh wordovBf 20 
t 30 p*T <!rard 

4 DAYS 

20 word) or leti 

$1020 

•och viwd Ov«r 20 

}.35 p«f word 

5 DAYS 

20 word) or leis 

Ho,;o 

•och wond over 20 

$.40 p«r vrord 

( conwci/fiv* doy fa«« | 



MOW TO PAY 

All cloisi'ieds mull be 

poid 10 advance untett 

you hove an oc count 

with Student 

(Stbltcotioni Inc 

Coif), ch«ck, 

MoilefCofd or Viw ore 

accepted ^hete it o 

$10 Mfvic* charge on 

all refurned chocki 

We reserve the right to 

adit, lejecl or properly 

cloiiity (3ny od 



FREi FOUND ADS 

Al o lervice to you, we 

tun bund odi br three 

dtsyt IrM ot chorga 



CORRECTIONS 

(I you hncJ on etior m 

your od, pleow call ul 

Wt occepi reiponsibilh 

ty only few the hrit 

taitong iniertion. 



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10 



KANSAS STATI COUEGtAN 



MONDAY, OCTOiH 27, 19^7 




CUP MIMMRO/Coll^wfi 

SEVERAL STUDENTS bugK as Victor Moralai dtliv«ri hts Itaynoto oddret) Friday ottornoon tn Fotum Hall. 



Impact 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

Mtmik-s' MuiKC on is!iuc!i is inllu- 
trncctl hv his past Me rcltal tin foikl 
stamps 111 tilt av a iltikl and usal the 
(il Hill lo pa> litr Litltc^t; wlion hi' 
iviiiriK'tl triiii) \'ii'luain Allhttutrh his 
llispuiiii. iKTitiiL;*; has Kvn an inllu- 
aK'c. Ik' satil II Mar. mil a imiiiviitiit^ 
laiUu Miiiul his cainpiii{;n 

■■ I his ratv kViis ncvvr dbnui bem^ 
Iht- liw liiNpanic scuaitK I his was 
ahiiiil an iiiiliiiary ihtmm) nuf^iDt! a 



difference hy being honest, hv being 
everybody V sciuimr." he viid 

In the K't: I lining of his campaign. 
Morales said he received lillle cntifi- 
dfncL- from oihets thai he ci 'it hi make 
a dilTcrcncLV Many e\ptessed dtniht 
I ha I he would ever win a prmury 

However, Morales no) only vvoii 
ihe primaries but hisi lo (nanim b\ 
only 1 1 piiinls He speni S'MHl.tHK) and 
wim ^-1 2 milliiin voles while tit amm 
speni W million 

In spik' u( ihe ouktmte, he suid 
ihiil Ih' sidl leels v iclorious 

" riu' ttiirsl thing you ituild do lo 



me was not vote lor me." he said 
"I hen you would he sending nie Kiick 
to 111) beaulilul wile and kiils, and a 
job I liive I may even have to send you 
a I hank -you note " 

Morales said the campaign experi- 
enee and oiikome made him reali/e 
ihal lunmng hit ciingress is a guiil he 
has ihe ability to achieve He said he 
h.is lo keep his nnpuriani prioniies in 
mind 

■■{imJ knuws I did everylhmg (or 
ihc right reason and the riglii way," he 
said "I here is no such Ihmg as dcleat 
or failuie when vou do thai " 



Math 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

all 

■Righi mm we arc trying Ui sec il we 
can tiH' I he money that's not used lo 
hrittp m .1 1'h 1) or scholarly visiior>> lor 
n ^hort iiiiv pcriiHl" teller said 

A I this iinie sonic lemp^trjry taculty 
has K'cn hired to help out with ihe short- 
age ol iiisliuclors 

"I vcn ihtHigh there arc some excel- 
lent subsiiiute teachers, students need to 
he I a ugh I hv a permanent I'acully." 
Bcnnell said 



"We've asked umvcrsiiy administni- 
tors to U\\ the hiring* Iree/es. but thai has 
talien I'li dcil ears," ^elter sod 

James (oilman, university provosi. 
said the purjHisc ol" the possible hiring 
Iree/e was to save money in order to 
ohtiun itisiriiciional ei|iiipmeni 

"We re going lo go slow on ihc 
iinplemeniaiion ol this lo ensure a more 
compleic discussion with faculty leadci- 
ship and individual deans." (on'man 
said "We need to try and liivc lunc the 
siuiaiion before we can go on " 

VcMier said inslruelional ct|uipinents 
arc needed, but not .is much as scholarly 
journals and addiiioniil faculty members 



are needed 

rile math dcparlineni has taken hi^ 
sieps to make il an established ntiilh 
dcpariinent nationally, he said 

"At one lime, our national niuking 
was 2S\ Now we arc ranked 'Nith," 
Yetter said ■We can'i tw cv pec led to 
compete luiiomillj if we have a shortage 
ol racullv " 

IteniK'tt said with rceeni increases in 
the number ol students all ending K- 
State, mote |vimaiient taculty membets 
WTHild need lo be hired 

"Vou can replace ct|uipment ami 
other learning materials, bui you can't 
replaec peiiplc." Bennett said 



Buzzard 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

work cm out lor us We have w get 
people out III iheu cars and into shel- 
ters " 

Nearly l((t> residentti in Pueblo's 
hlacked-oiit area were being evacuat- 
ed by 4-wheel-drive vehicles to a Red 
If OSS shelter at the state hospilal. s,iid 
Rochelle I ru/ ol the hiehio I ounty 
I merge lie y (Iperation.s Center 

Dm on the eastern plains, the 
retieatmg storm left towns like 
I imon. Akron and Sterling virtually 
snowbound 

"Ahtiut 71) inolonsis are in the 



hnvii II, ill. ,ind all of die iiiotcls are 
lull." said I incoln ( ounty sherilT's 
deputy (iuidon Noll at 1. niton. *MI 
miles east of Denver 

In sonthein Wyoming, two I'S 
forest Sei v ice employees w ho s|Viit a 
coUk siiowv night ouidoors vvalked to 
salety S.iUirdav mghi Xuthorities 
said Ihc hunicts were surprised hv the 
sttong stoini I lul.iv and Ivc.mie lost 

Ihe siorm ciused sciltered jvower 
outages III sevetiil I oloiado lomnui- 
mlies I tilily ollicials said thev 
couldn't begin work on resionng si'i- 
vice until the wind died down 

"I his IS as eailii as I've cvei seen 
It get this wihL" Mike Schmidt of 
Mesa. Am/ . said .Saliirday at K.iton. 



N M . where he s|H-n1 the mghl in a 
motel 

C ollcge lootball games m 1 1 
( ollms. between ( olorado State and 
Tulsa, and in dree lev. between tlie 
I imversity of Morihern ( olorado and 
Nebraska-lhnaha, were postponed 
until Sundiiy 

Hie worldwide IT Nino phenome- 
non, enpected to give paiK ol the 
West a wet, sioimy winier. could K- 
involved m ths'scverilv of the i ktok't 
hliz/ard. said Irank Ik'iiton at the 
National Weather Serv lec oil ice in 
1 }eitv ei 

"We haven't had time to icscatch 
It,'" he said "We can i even get people 
to come tti work " 



China 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 

give nuclear assistanee to Iran. 
Pakistan and other countries .\n 
agreemeni would include the liDing 
by the I linton admimsiralion td 
re«triciions on the sale to t. hinu of 
US nuelcat reactors 

The secretary said some gond 
news also has come on human rights, 
the recent release Irom cusUhIv ol a 
Roman ( aiholic ( hmese bishop 
imprisoned lor preaching oiiKide the 
govcrnmcnt-sanciioned church 

Sen Orrin Hatch, a conservative 
Repuhlican from I lah who recently 
visiied China, praised the .idmimsua. 
ti<ih\ pitsnitm on human rights, pro- 



nouncing II 'Ihe best way to work 
with t lima" 

He predicted on "lo\ News 
Sunday ' thai while ( hina. not wanti- 
ng io appeal in suirendcr to pressure, 
will avoid making' human rights con 
cessions ill the summit "I do believe 
that shortly alter ihai. you 11 sec some 
changes m human rights." he s,iid 

Other lawmakers with grievances 
against ( hina enniiniied io demand 
that C Itnton he .is bhim as |\issible 
with /emiii 

Sen Arlen Speciei. R-Pa., sponsor 
III legislation that would s.uiclion 
nations that punish |XMplc lot reli- 
gious beliefs, asked I Imlon lo hand 
/emin a letter seeking the Chinese 
leader's .ipprmal to visit t hina and 
lilvi to examine tehgious persecu- 



tion 

Sen. [)itk Keitipilioine. R-ldaho. 
alsitseni t linum.i Iciiei asking him to 
press Jiang to icniove a I hiiiese Km 
on wheal and harlev lioni Ihc 1 S 
northwest 

( hie ol (. apilol Hill's most outspi)- 
ken I hina vTiltcs. Rep Naitcv Pelosi. 
H-lalif , said on ( NN thai the 
Deijing government Mored 'a great 
victory in getting a state visit," Oie 
said 

"W hv should we he rolling out llie 
red carpet lor the leader of a legiiiie 
thai crushes dissent in its own coiin- 
Uy ' Why should vve give a 21-guii 
salute lo the leailei of ihe People's 
I iKT.ition Army. v*hich prolileraics 
weapons of mass desUuction" in 
rogue natums ' 



Anderson 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

"It would give Ihc [vedcsltian the 
righl-ol-wav as sihiu as there's a gap." 
Messer s^nd 

Mac T.ir land s.iid the project does 
mit consider the saletv ol |vdesiti,ins 
because lis goal is to increase the 
speed ol vehicles 

"Ihe whole thing is designed lo 



move italtic at ID mph Hut's wh,ii 

kIM II w,Ulls " lie said 

Maclarlaml said ii.dlic would still 
be iougesicd because of the 
planned paiking gai.ige lo Iv lovatcd 
in Ihe k-Sialc Student i nion parking 
lot 

"It's onlv going to K- ,i icmporarv 
fi\." he said "1 doni Ivlicve it's a hal 
.meed plan " 

Madarl.iiid also s.iid the right - 
iiinung lane was not included m the 



oiiginal plans Messer s,iid the turning 
Line was inclmled iii I he pl.liis 
Hiiwevcr, he saiit the leni'ih ol the 
lane mereaH'd .is |)lans dev elojied 

"Il became evident that wc wete 
going to need a longei lane th.in was 
otigutiilly sliown," Messer said 

I ommitlee meniK'ts agreed, in 
light ol the additional meeting, that 
they should mil scud a resolution Ui 
Student Senate uniil moie sindeiU 
opinion uasg.iihered 



Difference 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

Restturecs prognitit His interest in the 

program atose from his job as a pms- 
ccutor with Ihc Rdcv l nunty aMoi- 
ncy'solTice, 



i gol mviilved Willi this hcc.iuse I 
wanted .m aheirutivc to vvoiking with 
kids mhei th.in prosivutmg ' 

Dtliers volunteered with civic 
groups or k -Slate campus otganiAi- 
1 lolls I liic siieh oream/aiioii tv.is the 
Simlh Scholarship House 

"We try to orgam/e occasional 



opivoitunities lo don.ite nine wiih (lie 
coniinunilv ni ies|HHist' to the kind ol 
K'lielMs we receive Ifom living iK'te," 
Vlati Sandhulte. Smith resident 
said 

*f ollcge IS lot pieiiaiing to K* part 
ol society, ,iiid I leallv value sliatiiig 
time and lesoiirces." he said 



Prt'yiianc\ 
I esliiiy (enter 

'I iccpivgnana 

icmiiil; 
•lotalK a>n(Ulciitial 

service 

'Same clay resiills 
•Call fi)r'ap|'H»ititn\ent 

! itc.itc'tl across Inuii cuinpth 

m \tuic(siiii \ ill.tiv 



MOniDAY 

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tai In 

inufM.tWpt 1 (man'irwnwi iiMmiIciiik»ii 

la ttw daughltr ot 

(nw|0i/4*pil (tMHMn'inama) 

Ol . 

(ptf*ni ( fuimal (cHvWiWI 

)• tha aon of ot 

tmaA'tAam^l ifMrftnt'i nflmpi 

. Tho coupt* Is planning a/an 

imv'MaMt 

wwWIng at 

(dalal gOMIIcn.atv.ilaH) 



WF 1)1)1 N(; ANNOIINCEMEM 

wort marrlad 



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(iDCiMKin.cKirtWal (w«nin « namai 

lit In 

(cluMK«lioii) ima^tx/ilapl l Inwn i rwml 

la a m 

idAtiilKiiliunt imaioi'ditM 1 (wtinMntnainai 

la Ih* daugtiltr of ot 

iparani ■ ntnwl 

Il tl>* ton of 

(ulY'ililB) lman« nvnai 

Of 
I [Mrani « twm I Icitymala) 

Tho couplaa atttitdantt mwt 
Othar briaf dtlalla: 



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v.- -.- .'..j*-^,' 



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CoilfGIAN 

DIRfCTORY 




ClAlW(f[."i 



i2H6556 
532^i560 



532^555 




kimdu 



STATE 



MANMAn*N, KS 66506 




^01 i02 N'- it 



TIRED OF PARKING PROBLEMS 
SUCH AS WHEEL LOCKS, FINES? 

^ Chriitophaf McLMtiera deKth^i o pbce where 
a wheel lock n alwoys someore elie s loull and ttie 
handicap parking ipolt are open to anyone 

S«e OPINION, Page 4 




INDEX 
In today'* 

Briafi 

Diversioni .,. 



.2 
7 



K-Sw. LINEBACKER JEFF KELLY 
SURVIVES HOSTILITY AT OKLAHOMA 

^ Lifl«bocker iaff Kelly not only hod to endure a lough 
bottle on the field on Saturday, but alto had to endure 
font who haras ted him becaute he choie K-Stote over 
Okbhomo 

See SPORTS, Poge 6 




OctrjMt2e, 1097 
TUESDAY 




■/•'iiin.ft ,jrid mojtjy 
iiifiy wilh a north 
wevt wilid of 10 
lo 1 5 mph Tonighl, 
iea' 

*^ ; ■ - TCI, PAGt 2 



Course information proposal may be funded with new privilege fee 



SAu HmDcm 

Lafcne Health Center, Studcnl 
Publications Inc. and Bramlagc 
Culi9«um have one thing in comnwn 
These services, along with irtany mhcrs, 
receive money frum ^tudenl's priMlc(!*; 
fees. N(>w. iht' Privilege l-cc Commiltcc 
migKt add annther fee to the liM 

Although nolhing has been vott-il i>n, 
the eummitiee di<icussed adding a Ice to 
help the course in formation prog rani. 



created by ( hris Hansen, Itirmcr student 
KhIv prcMdcnl. Ut help sludcniv learn 
mitre about K -.State teachers 

The otily way to gel mfofniiilion t»ti 
the May professors teach is id ask ihem 
The course infiirntiition pnmrani wtnild 
alUm siuilcnis to access teacher evalua- 
tions jiid surveys. 

.Ahhoufih J small percentage nl the 
funding uill L'omc liom .iJminisitalivc 
suppori, most would c<niie frDm the tww 
fee. if It IS passed 



The fee would be distributed in three 
areas. Hansen said A graduate student 
Mould be hired to cotirdinale the educa< 
tional research This student would be 
paid S5.IXKI to S I li.lKXJ a year to be com- 
pelitivc with similar posiimns on cam- 
pus. 

The ne\t portion of ihe fee would be 
altiKated fi>r undergraduate students 
asstsimg in the coahtion olihc data The 
litsi portion ot the fee would go toward 
ihe printgng and disseminatum of the 



survey 

Ongmally, the cimimitlec members 
said they thought about including the tee 
m the ( ffTiee of Student Acliv lives and 
Services fee because il will not require a 
significant amount ol mone> The pro- 
gram Mill cost jNiul S^<t.lKMI. Hansen 
said The committee decided it Miiuld K- 
better for the OS AS to keep the two sep- 
arate. 

"Our budget is really complicated 
now." tiaylc Spencer, OSASeiKirdinalor. 



said "It you put ihe money in the t)SAS 
budget, you set a precedent for every lit- 
tle thing going into thai budget " 

If the program receives funding, il 
will begin collecting data in fall IWK 
and the informaium would be published 
and available for spring I'M'' 

The eommittec also uiied unani- 
mously It) write ihe bill for Hramlage 
favorably with a SlS.WKt cut in Us bud- 
get because Dramlage has ehise to 
SIOII.IKKI in its reserve account 



t'ommittee member Jelf Meder com- 
mended liramlage Director Charlie 
Thomas for siayuig wiihm the budget, 
but, he siill had stime concerns with 
allowing Hramlage to receive the same 
amount nf lees in the tulure 

"I have J problem with allocating 
S.lO.lKMl and only have liatf of that 
spent." Meder s.iul 

Meder s,iid Hramlage will be given 

See PRIVILfGE, Page 10 




MMY WAItDf aisiltant profeijoi of family itudiei and human lervicet. gbncei outltda while exiling Seoton Hall on Monday morning Monday's tow wot 
in the 50t 



cur nuMHiro coii^pan 

m the 20 J, and today s high should be 




AUOCIATIO PtISS 

NI:W VOKK In a day of worits on Wall 
Street, the l>ow Jones industrial average plum- 
meted a record $54 points Monday, totcing an 
early halt to trading tor the first lime under rules 
adopted following I he IMaek Mimduy crash of 

The liellofrwaii <»el olf by an economic criKiN 
in Southeast Asia and wait aggravated as traders 
sought to preserve profits before all their i^ins 
for the year were gone 

The Urn's plunge of 554.26 to 7.161 15, 
surpassed (be 5(W-pomt loss of Oct. I*'. I''K7, 
the previous rccofd drop Uul the 7 )!- percent 
decline, while the 1 2 ih- largest ever, wat not 
clo!ic to the 22 6-|Krccnt collapse in Ihe '87 
cnsh 

Hroadcr stock miriei indicators also hud 
record point lu»ict. 

Overall trading was rwar fnday's atl-lime 
record, wilh a new high in volume on the New 
York SitKk In change 

"This was the snap hctv^^n the eyes," said 
Alfred E. (JoldmBn, vice prciiident at A(t 
Edwards & Sons Inc in Si I^uiii "TTi<* market 



was m a correctional phase for three weeks, and 
the siiualion m A.sia |usi opened (be flooil 
gilcs ' 

Wilh Monday's loss, the Row 's losses grew 
Ut nearly i I pt'rcem. or )(74 points, since 
Wednesday's clusi- It was on Ihursdav that a lit 
percent drop in Hong Kong's nuiin index began 
sending Shockwaves throughout vtorlct financial 
markets 

Wall Slrcels bcsi-known indualor also is otT 
I , I tH) points from its Aug (t record of H.25') ^ I . 
a dmp of I i.y percent and the firsi "corrcelion" 
of more than H( percent since Ociober I'WO 

Fvcn w lib the declitte, the Dnw is up 1 1 per- 
cent this year 

Under rules adopted alier the I 'M 7 crash and 
aimed at rcslormg order to sharply moving mar- 
kets, iradmg was hailed for a tialt hour at 2 15 
p m as the IXiw tor the first time passed one of 
Ihe "circuit breakers" a drop ot more than 
JSO ptunts. After the hah etuled at .Vl)5 p m,. it 
took jusi 25 minutes to lose an additional 2(XI 
points and pass the 55(t-ptnnl barrier. That 
slopped trading lor an hour, ending a trading 

See STOCKS, Page tO 



Record drop for Dow Jones 

MorHjoy. Ih« I>ow Jon«l Hod iH bkggeil daily po,nt drop ty*f H«ra l| ^dw .i 

50e00lo 



25 

20 p««c*ni 
IS pexenl 
10 p«fc«nl 
9 p»fc»nt 
B fMrcflnl 
7 pwrc«n1 

6 pcrunl 
S p«fc«fll 
4 p«fctnl 
3 peKenI 

7 ptrcanl 

I 



/« DO. 

SJ4C 



1W5SIO 

2.369 2« poinlt 

&.9% 



m 



171 34 to 
30* 




156 83 lo 

^* 7,161 15 poinn 



f^^ 



/.18V 



Morchl, I9S6 Oct t3, I9B7 Ckl 19 1987 Ocl 26 l«a/ 0«».2M997 



^fusi t T^ lutia H#^> PdtW 



7t..^... 



Game offers stack-market skills^ 
instruction without money loss 



tutr Apujt«f 

The Mnptattofl of pliyini the stock nruu- 
kd hu become an ■cadeniic punuit 

There ii even twc wiy lo inveai in the 
Mode miHtel but not Iom any money in the 



The K- State's Center for beonomic 
Education otTers a stock marfcei game to alt 
105 CDunitea in KMias. The Stock Market 
(lame ii an electrontc-educattonnl simula- 
ttofl of Wall Street trading, dc.iigncd to help 
itudemt and aduJtti undemud the itock 
nwkn, (be coali and boieftu involved in 
dtcitioiMmkiDg, the MunM and uxcs of 
Mpjiil and olhtr ralued Momfnic eoncepis. 

"Out main purpotte is to gel students to 
Icain nMfc about cconomtct tn the United 



StateM," said Dtwothy Soldan, the economk- 
center tlirccior and coordinatot forihc Stock 
Market Oamc in Kanitas 

Soldan said tlicK arc twti ways to study 
the stock market on a corporate level and an 
iiulividual level 

The corporate level deals with how capi- 
tal is raised and ho* companies are ar$k' 
niMd. The individual level deals with uixler- 
standing investments and ivow the stivk mar- 
ket affects the eeotH>my, 

Mike Dacker. a high school economics 
teacher from Uoi Angeles, itarted one of the 
ftrsl invesimcni classes lor high school stu- 
dents in the Uniied State* 

Dacker said he believes students of the 

Sm OAM, Po9a 10 




EMShori 



Ex-professor 
sues K-State 
for$l million 



JOHN HINIKItSON 

»- .i.it .»i ■- ■ 

A mass (.omtminicalMms profcsMir is claiming that his 
tenure uas maliciously denied last year by three faculty 
members who "will fully conspired" lo defame him 

As a result. .\\\ Kaiiso l:l-(iluiri is suing the tmiver- 
siiy. Its president and the three faculty tnemhcrs for S I 
million 

Hl-tihori, now living near Hosion came to K -State 
as an assistant professiir in l*W(l He was denied tenure 
in Ueccmdei NSIS and left ihc 
faculty this summer 

According to the suit, he 
named Tom (inmcs and t baric- 
Pearce, b<tth tenured prolcssiHx 
in lournalism ,md mass commu- 
nications ;ii KStale. lo have 
"purposely and maliciouslv pre- 
pared and circulated hi ihe 
l( ollege Advisory! ( ommiiiee 
and the Dean lof .\ris and 
Sciences) false assessmer.is of 
Ihe plamlilT's leachmg and 
scholarship qualities " 

In Ihe suit, l-l-(ihori said that dnmes, claiming to 
he I'l-tJhort's "mentor," wrote the com m nice a letter in 
which he said |-|-(ihori was a "'liter' whom ihe schtwl 
wtnild he stuck w ith," publislicd "amateurish" research 
articles and falsified research data 

Ihe suit contends ihal immcs had a "personal ani- 
mus'* for I'l-fihori and had cnlisicd the help of Pearee, 
who was l.l-Cjhori's real mcnior in ihc tenure process, 
lo circulate "false assessments of the platniilT's teach- 
ing and scholarship qualilies " 

tjnmes had allegedly referred to hl-tihori, who is 
Lebanese, as an "AyRab," a comment I l-(ihori said in 
Ihe suii is ev idence thai (inmes had a racist motivation 
tiir his actions 

tn addition, (-.l-tihon's tenure approval would mean 
that Cirimes would have to "keep up" with M-tihori's 
higher rate of research prinlucitv iiy, the suit claims 

irthe Iwo had noi inlerlered. the suit claims, Rl- 
(ihori would have received leniia- Because he did not, 
and had been on the faculty lor more than slk years, his 
contract wasn't renewed 

Peter Nieholls, dean of the t'ollege .\ris and 
Sciences, had sent I l-(ihon a mid-tenure review letter 
in May iw;t that praised his ability as a teacher and 
researcher 

"You are a valued member of our faeultv," \icholts' 
letter read, "and 1 know that your continued elTorls in 
scholarship and teaching w ill keep vou on track lor a 

See SUIT, Page 10 



Faculty member 
isolated by peers 



An unnaiTied department has censured a faculty 
member, hut I acuity Senate is releasing little informs- 
lion on the issue at this time 

hdlowing a disagreement, some members of the 
faeuhy iiM^k a vote to have an individual isolated fmm 
the rest oi the department I his action caused a dispute 
re)$arding the beha^ lor of faculty mtembcrs, said Senate 
spokesman Michael McNamara 

"We 'a- trying lo focus on the principles We don't 
think a group of faculty members should behave tn this 
way," he said. 

Hrad fenwick. Senate faculty anaire chair, said he 
could not discuss the cctisuie, but said C-enate is' 
addressing the principles 

"What Kacully Senate has done is taken a p.isiiion 
on the principles of how faculty inemlwrs shi uld be 
treated." Henwick said 

McNamara had no comment on the derails of the 
situation and named none of the involved faculty mem- 
bers. 

"Many pcviple are coneerncd ah«»ut this issue We're 
irvtng to \t\ this problem." McNamara said "There is 
ail opporiunity lo fis il this week * 

McNaniarn said tlie dcparlment is irying to solve 
the dispute inicmally 

If the issue is noi resolved this week. Senate will be 
more likelv to eiwtiTteni. McNamara said 



DEADLINES 

TO PUCE AN ITEM 

ifi (he Doily Plannef, 

^top by Kodzie 1 1 6 

and lilt out a form 

or frmoil it (o 

colkgnGkivedu 

by ) I o.m. two doyi 

b«(or« it )t to run 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



MA^4AG^NC EDno« 

ju noRf 




NEWSrewind 

Nff*i Sewind f:oilech *e wp consul, tetd, Hoi*, noliono* and woftt fi«wj from rf>« pott 48 hcun Brmh w» cdkcmi I 
roffl wvs and iloH r«porti 



5Hi wavt of Fort Riley sotdiors 
expected to return from Bosnia 

FORI RILEY, Kan ~ A welcome-home 
csremony is expected to greet approximate- 
ly 60 Fort Riley soldiers returning from 
Bosnia 

The soldiers ore expected to land in 
Forbes Field Air Force Bose in Topeka a( 1 I 
tonight ond continue on to Fort Riley Friends 
artd (amity ore encouraged to attend the 
welcome-home ceremony at Hongar 8 1 7 on 
Morsholl Field at 1 o m. Wednesday, 
depending on potentiol delays 

The soldiers are the fifth wave ol Fort 
Riley soldiers to return ofter o six-month tour 
of duty in Bosnio Since the hrsi rslurn in 
early September, almost 1 ,000 soldiers 
hove teturned From participating tn 
Operation Joint Guard 

Although Q dote hos not been set, the 
final wave of obout )00 soldiers is due to 
return in mid-November After thol return, no 
Fort Riley units will remain in the war-torn 
country. 

AuthoriHes soy HIV-infected man 
linked to at leost 1 1 new cases 

MAVVILLE, N y - At least I 1 young 
people become infected with HIV, ond 
health ouihorities said Monday they traced 
the outbreak to a man who approached leen 
girls in schools and porks and traded drugs 
for sex 

Choulouquo County Heolth 

Commissioner Dr Robert Berke soid the 20- 
yeor-old man continued having sex after he 
leorned he hod HIV, the virus that couses 
AIDS 

Public health authorities counted 28 
coses of direct sexual contoci and 63 coses 
of secondary contact — people who had 
sex with any ol the 28 Seventeen other 



coses were still being studied, bringing the 
total number of people possibly linked to the 
man to 98, Berke soid 

"This cose demonstrotes the unaccepi- 
able level of drug ond alcohol use m our 
teens," he soid. "Sex For drugs oppeors to 
be implicated in ot least tome of the con- 
tocts " 

The mon, Nushowo Williams, is in cus- 
tody in the New York City area, the Post 
Journol of Jamestown reported Monday 

State spokeswomon, Frances Torlton soid 
she hoi never heard of o cose in New York 
stote where one apporenl HIV corrier possi 
biy infected so many others. 

University, museum censor nudes 
from traveling sculpture exhibit 

PROVO, Ufoh — Mormon Chufch owned 
Brighom Young University has pulled four nudes 
from an exhibit ol works by renowned French 
sculptor Augusle Rodiri, including his famous 
The Kiss." 

'We hove fell thai the nature of those woris 
ore such that the viewer will be concentrating on 
ihem in a way thai is not good (or us,' loid 
Compbell Gray, director of the BYU Museum of 
An 

Gray soid museum and university officials dis- 
cussed the issue (or two months before deciding 
the four works would be censored 

Rodin's sculpture 'The Kiss" shows a man 
and woman, both nude, in on embrace Other 
pieces pulled from the exhibit during its stoy 
through January ol BYU ore ' SoinI John The 
Baptist Preaching," "The Prodigal Son" and o " 
Monument to Balzac" 

Three years ogo, tf»e school was the brunt of 
criticism for its decision to cut portions of the 
movie "Schindler's List" showing nudity and vio- 
lence when it showed on campus. 



DAILYplanner 

Tfw Daily Planrtc ri the Codegion'i campus bultad boord 
server ittn^i Ji the phf^r^ can be pt/btah^ up to ItirM 
timei tt^rtii mtght not appeat bfcaftc gI ipoce conirroin^ 
but Of* guaroni»ed to oppeor on ihe doy o/ ihe activity h 
placf on itfin. ttop by Ktdne } It and tiii oul a lorm or t- 
moil it k) coltegnttksu edit by 1 1 am two days btlbre it it to 



• Aduh Slwdenf Senrkei will tponior brown bog lunch 
e> lor oduii nonlradilionol Jtudtnts from M o m lo I 

p m today and Wednesday m Union Stotefoom I 

• United HMIwdlfl C^mpiM Mniftry will ttoveon 

miormol praiw and worthip Mrvico «v»<y tuesdoy in 
Oanbfiti Chop*) Wcxihippen img pion* »ong» ham 
J 45 io S p m ond lh«n coniinue m wotkhip unril 5 30 
All ore welcome 

• lEH will mml ol 5 30 lonighi m Durkind 173 

• McCain iUnbaiM<ierf w<ll meet oi 5 30 tonight m 

Un«nn Sfrsfii'" 

• lufltergn Campus Mniilry will tiove Hipper and 
bible iludy ol & loniglit at itie Bopiisl Compul Center, 
1801 Ande^stTn Ave 

• tntenKrti«««el Club w<li megi at / ionighl at (he 
Iniarnaiiofiol Studsni Cenler Evaryon* il wekom* 

• Sigmo Delfa K, Spanish honorary will meei ol 7 
tonight ifi bientiower 1 24 to diicuii lt» rJiHerenl Slwdy 
Abrood prcgromi. The nweling ii open to everyor* 

• The GrwdiMie Sthoel lioi KtiedgM the fmal oral 
d«fsrive oi the doctoral diu*rtatio<i ot Homed Al Hoihan 
for I p m Wednetdoy in WoMri 329 

• The Graduerte SdweJ hoi Kfieduled the imal oral 
datsnMi o' the duct^ial doienotion ij Anil Menon for J 
p m today m Woteri 1 33 

• HiNel Will metl al 8 30 iwighl oi Jme in Agg«vill« 

• Student Corner Reseerth Awordi of J500 af« 
□■giioble lor uniMr^ioduoM tiixlentv in o heahh-rakned 
degiK Applicoiiont. now available m Atlitrl 413. ore 
duebyOef e 



POUCEblotter 

Report] ore tolan duaclly from Ae K-SMe ond Kiky Counfy poliet 
dBporimend' doiV (og» Wfc (to no* lut whM^ bcii or minor troftc nob- 
tioni becouse of ipoce cont>t9in<i. 

KSTATE 

SUNDAY, OCT. 2« 

• At 12:19 p.m., a hi^nd-rur> accident wos report- 
ed in Lot D- 1 E. An unknown vehicle backed irito a 
porked cor 

• At 10:37 pm., damage to a driver's side mirror 
wos reported in lot b-2 . Loss was estimated at $ 1 00. 



mUYcOUNTY 

SUNDAY, Oa. 26 

• At 1 0. 16 o m , an oggravated ossoull report was 
filed at 3361 Kitten Creek 

• At 10:34 om, o crioiinakhreots repwrt was filed 
at 9 1 3 Btuemorvt Ave. 

• Al 6:3i p.m., a compoci disc player wos reported 
taken arid damage wos done lo the dash of a vehi- 
cle in Green, Kon. Total loss wos $600. 

MONDAY, oa. 27 

• Al 6:32 a m , o sexual battery wos reported Ll 
Buddy Moys of the Riley Counfy Police Deportment 
said the report was returned to the officer for comple- 
tion and no arrest wos mode. 

• Al 9:13 am, tools were reported stolen from 
1 301 A n th St. Total loss was $ 1 ,0 1 0. 



Sii^ 



ONS 

Someiimei iht <.oll«gi<in molies (i miloiia II o misKi4e occurs. conKiCt JiB 
Slory. managing sdiKjr, by phone |ii32-6SS6|. by frflMiil 
callegnSisii adu or by Hopping by ihe Cdlcgion ol Kadiia 1 16 




Towv 

Sunny and 
wormer wMho 

light wind. 
Ibnighl. dear 

and cod. 



WariMT ond 

cloudy this 

week with rain 

likefy ort 

Fridoy. 

akmstH 

ftY PHONE 

Nfw«ooM 

A0«1BMG 

SM-6SM 

CtASS<t«OS 

S33-U5S 

■Ti-MAIl 

coukmAesu.ipv 

■YIMUl 

KAi«uSiAn 

ComCMN 

Kedzi 116 
Kansas SiAiE 

Unwksty 

MANtUTTAN, KS 

66506 

IN rBlSON 

TheCoiegun 

t€W»CX>« Q M 
KEDZf 116 

Iaoossfkm 
TtcK-Suit 

Snx!tt4r UmonI 



TN KcHiMit Stol* C»ll«4ian [USPS 29 1 020). o student newspo^ oa Kansas Slate Univ^nity, n puUished by Student Publictitions trx- Kedjw V03 Morfiuiian Kon 66506 The Cottegtort is pufaynd y t w l t doya during the school year and twks u week through ihe surnner 
(Wtodi;ol f.> . bi ). . ; :■ '.'.JM ..*)ii. Kan 6W02 K>SJMA5fEll Smj oddress <;hon<)es to Komos Slots Collegian, oicdoiior d*it Mzm 101 MonlMltor. K,'v.. 665067167 C l£v«*j Stw CoufGWN. 1997 




SPONSORED BY: 




DetailslHOOKEDDP 



COILEGE TOUR 1997 




^ 





Your Official KSU Bookstore 



OCTOBER 29TH 

FRONT LAWN OF 
K-STATE UNION 



K- 
SEATONHALL 



(RAINDATE OCT. 30TH) 



'^iHH H.W«? HYUnOBI LOREAL _•_ JML«„ <<H^ 




Wool MA HH 



V 




TUiSOAY, OCTOBER 28, 1997 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Bike race raises funds 
to help K-State alumnus 



lOtI OUlfOTU 

Kund raising fof a friend in need of a JouHl- 
lung transplant was. iht motivaiion behind ihc bike 
lour ftxim Kansas t'ity to Manhatlan on Saturday in 
the rain. 

The 120-milc bike Itiur 
down U.S. Highway 24 was 
initiated to raii^t* money for 
John Rhoadcs. a K-Siaie 
alumnus and member of 
Alpha Tau Umega fraternin, 
who is> on Ihv donor hst for a 
double lung transplant 
Rhoadcs is one of 20.(XK) 
people in the United Stales 
who suffer from cyilit I'lbro- 
sis, a disease caused b\ a 
genetic defect. 

Rhoadcs began al K-Siaie in fall 1*^2 He had 
to leave scht»l perraanenil> in December 
1 995bccausc of p*wr health. He has bven unable lo 
continue his education because of his three-week 
hospital slays every two to ihree months 

The idea behind the fund-raising bike tour, 
named the " 1 20 Milhouse Mile lo Manhattan" af^cr 




Rhoodes 



Ktuiades' nickname, Ntilhouse, uas originall> 
developed by Tim Muddci). K -State alumnus and 
fraternity brolhcr of Rhoadcs. Rhitadcs' friends had 
been brainsiotmitig ideas lo rain' nionc> lor ilic 
transplant since his niimc was added to the donor 
list, when Madden came up uith ihe idea of a hike 
lour, said Rich ( herra, K-State alummis and fraier- 
nily brother of Rhoadcs 

"This was something we all could do logeiher 
ihai would be a lot of (un." he said. 

Planning for ihc lour began m September, which 
just happened lo be the most eonvenieni weekend 

"Canceling because of the weal her was never an 
option we considered," Cherra said. "We knew this 
might have been our only chance If wc would ha\c 
wailed any longer, the weather would ha^c gollen 
worse." 

Six iwo-porson teams left Kansas t'ity at H am 
Saturday and arrived in Manhatlan at .1.1(1 pm .Ml 
the nder\ rode for Hi miles and then switched oil 
with iheir partners Icadinj^ the tour was a Dodjie 
Iravco Recreational Vehicle, which carried sup- 
plies, team memK'rs and Rhoadcs. who helped 
drive the RV 

See PUND-RAISEit, Page 10 



Community Health Council receives grant 
worth $600,000 for improvement of services 



AMlITTQUlf 

The Community Health 
Council has been awarded a 
%mmw Rural Health Network 
Development (iranl from the 
Office of Rural Health Policy 

The Communiiy Health 
Council, made up of Manhatian- 
area physicians, health care 
providers, city and county gov- 
ernment agencies. K-Slate and 
Manhaltan-Ogden USD 3X.1 rep- 
resentatives and ihe communiiv 
members, ensures access lo care 
and pledges to improve the deliv- 
ery of health care services to the 
community, Jessica Dedcrer, 
director of community services 
at Homecare and Hu.spice, said 

Nationally, the Office of 
Rural Health Policy gives grants 
that are awarded across the 
nation, and the Community 
Health Council received the 
biggest one. 

"The council hasn't applied 
fiw one before, w we wttc really 
excited to not only get one of the 



grants bui to gel the biggest one," 
she said "The grant-w riling 
team really deserves a huge 
thanks They were very inslru- 
menial m writing the grant and 
the council recogni/es their tal- 
ent and effort " 

Jon Rolf, ihc director of the 
O If ICC of tommunity Health ai 
K-Slaie and the Kansas Health 
I'oundalion distinguished profes- 
sor in communiiy health, was a 
crucial part of ihe granl-wriling 
team 

"I've had practice w riling 
grants. When I worked on my 
Phil, all we did was write 
grants It's what I do well,' Roll 
said 

The grant -writing team 
worked on the grant for aboui a 
week last spring. Rolf said 

"Usually the grant process 
can take up lo nine months, but 
we found oui in ScptemK-r We 
knew since we hadn't heard any- 
thing pnor lo thai wc might still 
- be in n." he said 

The grant award is for 



S2t)iMKKI per year for the ncM 
tha'c years. Dederer said "Wc 
are starting right now and will go 
until OciobcT 2(t(»i» It's del iniiely 
noi u lot of monev. bui it gives us 
something to work with" 

The council is aiming to con- 
tinue lo develop the council as a 
community organ i/at ion, 

increase loini planning and deci- 
sion-makint;. improve communi- 
caiion among providers and 
explore regional managed care 
approaches, I >cderer said 

The Rural Health Network 
IK'vclopnienl tirant is pari of ihe 
Rural Outreach t iranl Prugram, 
which was cslahlishcd m IV<M. 
Dedcrer said 

"The grant program was 
estahlishcd to assist rural com- 
munities to expand access, 
increase quality and decrease 
Ihe cosi of health care ser- 
vices," Dcdercr said "We're a 
rural community and receiving 
ihe grant shows thai there's a 
lot of promise here in 
Manhattan" 



Professor researches food contamination 



JiNNI IVANS 

T he reccni increase in eoniami- 
iialed bed. pork and poultry prinl- 
uels might lead some consumers lo 
believe there in no way to ensure 
ftKHl safely. 

John fov. assistant professor of 
agricultural economics, believes 
consumers are willing lo pay for 
those measures lo ensure the safety 
flfiheir meal 

The process that he has eoncen- 
iraled his research on is irradiation 

"Irradiation is the process 
whereby foods arc exposed to elec- 
tromagnetic energy. Al the 
approved dosage levels, 1.5 lo i 
Kilo(irays. il will kill up to W per- 
cent of salmonella. It's also very 
effective against the bacteria I. 
coll." fox said 

Irradiation desiroys insects, 
fungi or bacteria thai cause human 
disease or cause Iikh) io spoil. 

fox has centered most of his 
research on whether consumers will 
bay irradiated poultry prtHJucis 

"I found that people, when given 
accurate information about irradia- 
tion, are prepared to purchase those 
I'ixkIs that have been irradiated," he 
said 

No food manufaclunng plants use 
ihis irnidiation process fox said he beltc^cv ttii> is 
K*cause companies fear adverse consumer response 

"Most food manufaclurers have been reluctant to 
udopi the levhnology, because ihev are afraid thai con- 
sumers will react badly to purchasing irradiated fiMxls," 
fox said. 

Other concerns come (rom consumer advocacv 
groups thai think the irradialion process is unsafe 

"They may boycott stores that cany irradiated 
products," Kox \iiid. 

The process, however, is safe The fwnl does not 
become radioactive, as some advocacy groups 
believe. 

Irradiation involves passing ihe loud through an 
irradialum field but Ihe food never touches ihe 
radioaclive substance. The encrgv passed through ihc 
priHluci destroys mtisi ol" ihc hacleria hui does not 
alter the produci in any way. 

The place in the Lniied States thai uses this 
process of irradiation is an indepenJeni plant in 
Florida. 

Consumers who want their products irradiated 
bring them to the plant 

To irradiate food, meal manufacturers would need 
to build an irradiation chamber The irradiation 
process would be the last step in manufacturing. 

Fox estimates that building an irradiation chamber 
would cost anywhere from SI million lo S5 million 




JOHN FOX. 

ossiilonl pfofesvor of 
agriculturol 
economici, ho* 
concenlfotod hij 
reieofch on 
irradiation 
Irradialion destroys 
irwcli, fungi or 
bacteria thai couw 
human ditease oi 
cauie food to ipoil 

IVAN KOIAa 

CoJI^gion 



111 dclerniinc wliether eoiisumers would be will- 
ing lo pay for t(ie safely of their IoihL I ox conducied 
surveys and used experiments and retail trials. 

The survey was mailed randomly to 4IK) people 
and included ihe USDA pamphlet. "Ten Most 
Commonlv Asked (Jueslions About Irradiation " 

Ihe survey results showed that Kl percent would 
prefer irradiated poolirv if ii were olTcred at the same 
price 

In the experiments, fox brotight in a group of 
people and asked ihem to read the USDA pamphlel 
They vvere then asked if thev would purchase irradi- 
ated or non- irradiated pouliry Seventy-seven percent 
of Ihe participants said they would purchase irradiat- 
ed chicken 

In Ihe final experiment, fox made the irradiated 
chicken available al two grocery Mores in Manhattan 
over a pi'riod of lour weekends 

1 he chicken was dearly labeled as being irradiat- 
ed and intormntional pamphlets were left out for 
consumers to read 

The irradiated chicken accounted tor 4.^ percent 
of total sales, but Fox said few people took the time 
to read the pamphlet. 

Fox said that consumer's choices depend greatly 
on the information they receive about irradiation. 

When negative information is provided, no matter 
how untrue, people will not purchase irradiated food 



Support 
Stadium 

Expansion 




Vote 
Yes! 



[^ 



Expansion 
FACTS: 

'Fact It students pay less than one-third of total expansion cost. 

' Fact Zt Guaranteed 10,000 student seats at K-State rootball games. 

'Fact J: Student ticket rate frozen next four years ($10/game). 

' Fact 41 Recent grads (2 years) receive 55 percent season ticket 

discount. The only student privilege fee that offers return on 
investment following graduation. 

Vote Nov. 17"I8 

K-State Student Union/Vet Med School 



i^\#Wi?-. 



Chance 




$l.SOM^||g|I 



U1^ 



|l>^ 



m _ 

II SIC featuring 









SiLLQDXJ Aggieville, U.S.A 




C*W4(ONfDfI0i! 
MANMHIttia 

4 ^MM^B^^H 



COUEGIAN 




OURview 

Our Vitw, on ed'ioriol 
selected and debated 
by the editorial bowd, 
li wunen after o 
ina|ority opimon ii 
brmsd The adilorial 
board coniiitj of 
Coilegian editor i and 
olfwi itatt members 
Our view It ihe 
Cotleglan't officnl 
opinion 



KSU Stadium alcohol policy, adveitisements exhibit hypocrisy 



Don't make a run to the 
liquor storL- before the big 
game, forget about beer at 
your next tailgate party. 
Alcohol is not allowed al KSU Stadium 
— unless you're special. 

For the majority of football ticket hold- 
ers (the un-spccial >, alcohol is not allowed 
inside the stadium or in the stadium parking 
lot. 

This ptilicy makes sense. It helps crowd 
control and promotes safety on game day 

But don't think that the athletic depart- 
ment's alcohol policy posted on numer- 



ous signs and enforced by police applies 
to everyone It doesn't. 

For those who purchase club sealing or 
luxury boxes in the Dev Nelson Press Box, 
alcohol is alUtwed Guests in the boxes can 
also partake 

Rut by allnwmg alcohol in the press box, 
the athletic department makes the danger- 
ous assumption that those with money and 
influence will drink responsibly. 

The department also sends a strong mes- 
sage to other loyal less well-to-do Wildcat 
fans: You're not rich enough to drink. 

Plus, while thousands of fans watch 



football games at KSU Stadium and fotlow 
stadium alcohol rules, the Jumbotron al the 
north end of the stadium displays beer 
advertisements 

Coors, it seems, isn't just for rich people 
Away from the stadium, alcohol is accept- 
able. At football events, however, only high- 
er-ups can handle it 

By allowing alcohol in the press box and 
accepting money from alcoholic beverage 
companies, the athletic department sends 
mixed signals about alcohol This should be 
stopped. 

If some can't have akohol, no one 



should. That makes regulations easier to 
enforce and it bwisis safety dunnjii the game 
and on the drive home. 

The athletic department should also find 
other sources for revenue besides beer 
advertisements. Hale Library needs money. 
but no one has suggested a Bud Light 
Reading Room 

Alcohol and its advertisements should 
be banned from the stadium entirely. Thai 
ensures a safe game day (or everyone 
without the mixed signals. 



EDboard 



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Parking problems have an unsuspected culprit 



Students decide own destiny when it comes 
to wheel locks, tickets in campus parking lots 



It Ignorance is bliss, welcome to Utopia 
Vou live in a place where laek ol thinking is com- 
monplace 
A place where people arc oblivious to "No 
Pafkint;" signs 

A place where "Fire Lane" is often interpreted as 
"Please. Park Here" 

A place w here a whi'cl lock is always someone else's fault 
and the handicup parking spots should be open to anyone 

You live in a place where the very agency that works to 
keep parking munageahle is the same group that is constant- 
ly under attack by negligent car owners 

II there were no parking melers anJ no one to issue lick- 
ets. we would ;ill he in trouble It is the threat of receiving a 
iii'kei iltat forces us lo park in appropriate places I guaran- 
tee that if 1 had no incentive to do otherwise. I would drive 
to the K-Statc Student Union in early August, park my 19?.^ 
Volkswagen Micro Bus ( prov ided it was running) up close lo 
ihe building, and leave il ihcrc ("here would never be a park- 
ing spot a wi liable if Parking Services did nol prmide the 
inccnine |i c wheel locks) lo move your ear every once in a 
while 

l*ark]ng Services is not only doing its job but also doing 
.1 t,\\m lo all -tudenh bv control ling t.ar\ on campus They 
ate a nceessar> factor lii ensure safety, organization and effi- 
cienc) fhey are gtHtd If we all nag them, the hung-ups enter 
unanswered limbo They can't deal with the petty complaints 
ol 211,111)11 students over parking tickets 

Now, lin nol siying that parking on campus is perfect 
\\ed all love til be able lo lind a tlose sp*ii al any given lime. 
but this will never happen. We must work with Parking 
Services lo make sure that ihc parking situation gels better. 

Ihis Miouldn"! be Iwi hard lo understand, but just in ease 
It IS. I have ciealed a list of adv ice to help you deal with 




parking and thus avoid unpleasant meetings with Parking 
Services. 

Helpful Hint No. 1 : Parking meters require money Yes, 
it' s true. You have to pay lo park in the metered spots 1 real- 
ize that the 35 cents or so you have to pay could feed 1 3 chil- 
dren in a far away eountr>. but 
you can' t tell me that you 
can' t aflord it Dump the cig- 
arette butts out ol your ashtray 
and carry l(H>se change 
around with you. 

Helpful Hint No. 2: 
Pay your parking iickets The 
reaction ihal is typical when 
receiving a wheel ktck is very 
perplexing When you already 
have numerous unpaid park- 
ing tickets and you double 
park your car in a faculty 
handicap parking space, at 
what point does the reception of a liK.'k become surpnsing? 
l)o you think the friendly Parking Service enipli>ycc will 
simply overlook the lact that your car is parked on the lawn 
in front of Anderson Hall' Paying parking tickets is an easy 
way to circumvent the big, yellow tire bastard You might not 
have money to pay for the tickets, but the wheel ItKk charge 
is c*ven more expensive, and you still have lo pay the tickets 
Helpful Hint No .V t'arpiKil This whole parking prob- 
lem could be allevialc'd if we would use common sense I 
know you can fit at least four people in a (amaro /-2K, so 
do It (or corn's sake t'arpcNtling saves on gas. decreases traf- 
fic and will hopefully lead lo Ihe creation of a carpool lane 
thai runs down Andcrs(«n Avenue. If you and a I'ricnd arc at 
the same place and going to the same place, do it together 



CHIIS 

McUMORE 

CMMS McUMOIH n a topKo 

ipMch ^ou (an Mnd t-moil k> 
Omi tit tim I S8i9ttutdu 



Ik'sides, if you carpiMl. every morning would be like a 
fllondie cartiHvn (Dagwoud omitted). 

Helpful Hint No 4: Don't dfivc if you don't 
have to We must decrease driving lo 
sehool unnecessarily. A cartoon that 
ran in the Collegian earlier this semester 
showed a student arriving to class exhausted The 
reason'' He couldn't find an open spot, so he parked 
by Nichols Hall and walked all the way across 
campus to his class 

[Jrilliant. 

Leaving the car at home and walking 
from your residence, as opposed to walking front 
Nichols Hall ader searching unsuccessfully for a 
parking spot, would b« a much better idea 
(iranied. there arc petiple who live far from cam 
pus and should drive That's wfiy the parking 
spots were created. Howc-ver, dnving from 
two blocks away only to park four blocks from 
your class is not smart. Ask a math major for 
specifies. 

The overall problem is nol just the parking 
woes of siudents. The problem is the eoniinued 
harassment that Parkmit Services receives 
Complaining aKmi them is like killing a lly on a 
window with a sledgehammer. Sure, you might get 
nd of Ihe fly, but you create a larger problem than you 
originally had. 

So don't continue to harass the parking employees 
If you get a ticket and Income v lolently angry, pre 
lend that the man weanng the Parking Services 
smock wasn't the one who gave it to you. 

ARer all, ignorance is bliss. 




TICk-LT... v/MAl A 

Bi&:DomYj mi 






Corporate malls try but never succeed at replacing town squares 



When one arrives from Kansas Highway 177 by car in 
Manhattan, one does not notice a proud city hall or the archi- 
tectural signi Tiers of K-Slate, It's the Sears department store 

1 he placement of Manhattan low n t 'enter at the end of the 
prov erbial rainbow bridge over the river says as much about 
Manhattan .is the city's need for reminding its residents, via 
vihite-painled rticks on a hillside, that they live in Manhattan. 

The town C enter was built in I'M 7 and is celebrating its 
lllth anniversary this year with a S 51 )-per- person gala to 
biHii It was buih lo replace a collection of decrepit biildings. 
revilali/e downtoun Manhattan and make it extremely diiTi- 
culi to travel from cast to west in the city with a car. Residents 
icasotied tfiai if a mall had lo be built, which is an inevitable 
iKCurrencc in the I Iniied Slates, ii might as well he somethmji; 
of w hich they were proud 

I or a tn.ill. one can be reasonably happy with the Town 
Ccnicr. friie. one can't have a memorable meal or buy unique 
fashion, but the mall is a pleasant enough place Its evocation 
of a Maithatt.in design style, evidently industrial sheds and 
schlocky postmodern detailing, is warm and friendly; the 
fountains .done offer respite from the boredom o( shopping 

It remains, however, that one can live an entirely rewarding 
life wilhooi ever hav mg set fool in the Town C 'enter. 

Allhough ihc mall has tried to sell itself as some sort of 
modern town square a place for chance meetings, "picnics" 



and shopping, it is quite private in nature as per its owners 
forest (lly f.nterprises You won't sec any protests or frce- 
speech Aines near ihe mull entrance to Dillard's. Outside of 
consumption and Ihe occasional themcd lair or free concert. 
by its very defimtion the mall cannol act as purely public 
space. 

Dueling interests ab<iund The 
public entertainment offered at 
Ihc mall also serves to keep pctt- 
ple in the mull to shop Ilicre is 
no containment aspctt to a typi- 
cal d(»wnti*wn shopping street 
Unlike a mall, no master devel- 
oper has shrewdly calculated 
what urchiieeiural styles and 
symbols will appeal lo con- 
sumers on Main Street. USA 
However, the Town C enter rep- 
resents what amounts to public 
space in the modem city What 
has made Manhattan's mall 
expenence special, as itpposcd lo all of ihose other bad. boxy 
malls like Tttwn Last or West in Wichita, Kan , or Hannistcr 
Mall in Uvcrland Park, Kan , is that ours has replaced our 
downtown 




« us S I It 

FORTAv 

•utsmForriwrii. 

in aichilKPij^cl »ndir>wring ^ftjnt 
con 4«nd *.nkail la lutMll qt 



The suburb-dweller* of west Manhattan and the Wamego 
countryside arc attracled to the Town Center simply because it 
o tiers them a focused environment like a town square that is 
"in the heart of ii all " the mall offers the human interaction 
and grand open spaces a city down town. should, as opposed to 
Ihc parking lot mania of Westloop or the Wal-Mart K- Mart 
shop-plex. 

i)on't kid yourself, Manhattan The masses of consumert 
aren't hitting the streets, they're hitting the liles The only tra- 
ditional urban center m Manhattan that has maintained its 
vitality and customer loyalty is Aggieville And that might be 
more about bars than shopping ('villc-sialwart Varm7's has 
opened a mall branch in the pa.sl iwo years) 

Lately, the mall has begun to mimic Manhattan's downtown 
perhaps a bit too closely 

Both large wings of the Town Center are near- ghost towns 

empty storefronts of failed shopping concepts that now 
showcase over- sized cellular phone stores and this year's col- 
lection of automobiles 1. oca lly owned specialty stores H-lling 
candles and sunflowers open for a few months and close with 
football season Is this what Manhanan needs? 

It's like an old town with empty building storefronts sea- 
sonally decorated with pumpkins or old furniture evoking an 
elegant past, a city center a la Wichita's Cow town attraction. 

The mall has become a theme park at yet another level. It's 



turning into a museum artifact to W examined 

"Oh, yes, Timmy. ihal corrug.iicd tnet.il shupfroni houscil 
an old jeans store that lasted a year." 

Timmy: "Wim' lliey siild jeans back then, (irandpa''" 

Perhaps no one understands this nuire ih.in the critic 
Margaret t raw ford, who wrote of malls in the l'W2 Ivwk 
"V'anations on a Theme Park" that "architecis ni.inipulatcd 
space and light to achieve ihe density and bustle of a citv 
downtown 111 create csseniially a fantasy urbanism devoid 
of Ihe city's negative aspects weather, traffic and pixir peo 
pie." 

That might be overstating ihc case for the fown ( enter Jtid 
yet It's eerily familiar What consumer wants to be cimlronied 
with real life, which mighl be unsettling, when ihcv an- con- 
sidering buying a shocking orange overcoiii' Ihe fact ihal 
Manhattan is not crime-ridden or ItHi ptnerty-siricken mak>.s 
this consideralion f'tmlish. and yet we have a mall 

But whereas the real downiownof IViynt/ Avenue helont:- 
to the city and Us people, it will always be cared for and 
respected. Who will step forward lo lend a rev itali/ation when 
the Town Center deteriorates in qualnv even more' 

The Town Center could, like many other malls across itx* 
country already have, de|:cncrule into a place ttir lounsts. but 
very much unnecessary to the daily life of Manhattanitcs. Mow 
long did downtown Manhattan survive bctiiiv showing its age 
Surely longer than 1 1) years. 



READERSwrite 

Widening of Anderson 
haiordous to pedestrians 

Ldilor, 

As stinteone who crosses the streci at 
least four times a day iit one of ihe places 
that will be affected with the proposed 
widening of Anderson Avenue, I find 
myself m agreement with bvclyn Wray's 
letter lo the editor on f-ndiiy 

(ar drivers routinely run red lights 
and speed in this section of Anderson 
Avenue Anything Ihal encourages this 
kind of bchav lor while destmymg green 
space IS dangerous and short-sighted I 
hope Ihe City Commission will recon- 
sider this ill-advised venture at the earli- 
est possible moment 

I Job finder 
prtifcssor of history 



Support for footboll 
comes from students 

Editor. 

I just wanted to take a moment lo say 
that I think Ihc idea of expanding the 
KSU Stadium is a great idea. 

I recall the very first game that I saw 
there in Scptcmticr I9W It was the 
home opener, and the team played an 
cxcclleni game Unfortunately, there 
were very few fans (including students) 
in the stands 

It was at that game, almost two years 
before t began attending K-Stilc, that I 
saw the good team that the Wildciti ire 
and would be. 

1 think It II great that the idea of 
expansion t« now a reality, since the 
Wildcat sUiff and players have wtirkcd 
hard over the pint seven or eight years to 



make that good team the great team that 
it is today. 

Back in 194), no one would have 
thought that K-Statc could beat 
Oklahoma for five straight years We 
thought back then it was good to get a 
first down. 

What a difference the current coach- 
ing stafT has made Bill Snyder and his 
staff were hired to do a job. and now 
they are just one or two wins away from 
something never thought possible, a 
national championship 

I am glad lo sec the plan diat started 
in 1 989 when the Snyder era bcpn rise 
to the level of real stadium expansion. It 
in the right step and needs our full sup- 
port. 

However, it it also important to 
remember who the players really play 
for While there may be several answers, 
one group without question ii the Stu- 



dents 

Without students, there is no team at 
all 

The support of the student popula- 
tion IS intangible to the players when 
they are doing well and provides encour- 
agement when they need the support 
Therefore, I think il is important lo keep 
the student support right where it 
belongs bchmd the team. 

Thomas Trwe 
K-Stale graduate. 1994 

'Lynch Mob' negative 
nickname for Wildcats 

Editor, 

Something has started that really 
needs stop 

K-Statc hai an excellent football 



team, which has had one of the best 
team defenses m the nation for the past 
several years Such a tradition makes 
this dcfen.se deserving of a nickname 
like Texas A&M's "Wrecking Crew" 

In that vein, many are beginning to 
refer to K- State's defense as the "Lynch 
Mob" I'm sure that the intent of ihis 
nickname was merely to honor the team, 
but it does much more. 

Lynching, for those who are unfamil- 
iar with the term, refers to the practice of 
groups of whites hunting down A fri can- 
Americans, brutalizing them and even- 
tually killing them. 

This practice was common all over 
the country in the 19th and early 20th 
centuries and frequently occurred in the 
South until the |97()g. tl seems unimag- 
inable that wc could "honor" the Wildcat 
defense by the use of such a Icnn 



While I believe a nickname is appro- 
priale for K- State's powerlul def'en.sc, 1 
ihink wc have a rcspivnsibilit) to come 
up with one that docs nol hearken back 
to some of the most horrific, racist inci- 
dents in American history. 

Scott Mc Kinney 

graduate student in political science 



il 



TUISPAY, OaOilK a». 1997 



KANSAS STATE COltlQIAN 



Union Governing Board tables 
proposal of 1,200-pound wildcat 



LMMAPOPi 

Union (Mnverninm Htiard tabk'tl a motion 
Monday to accept a prt)posal liir a •iCulplurL- n)' tlic 
Powcrcat (rum IX-iJgmijcc I otimlry 

tX'ggtngcrs' liiiitiitr)' i»l topekii would like to 
itoitfltc the -Iwt by (i-l(mi tiron/t' >culplurc ti> the 
K-Statc Slmk'ni llnion. I he phiccmcnt and ihc 
tundtng K'hinil the 1.200-poiitiil -^■iilpiuift are still 
in qiaestiiin. a-sulling in the tabled moii»n. 

Union Diralor Her nurd IMis said he was seek- 
ing the appnnal ol Ihc concept Irom UfjtS and 
Union l-nhancemeni t iimmiltee. 

The H'ulpture is not iK'e-stiiDdint! and will 
rctfuire a structure lit Iv placed on. I'itis siud. The 
south side of the Union nr a Mriiclure buih in ihe 
the Unjuii Pla/a. belwccn the Union and Sealun 
Hall, are lun locations hein^ discussed 

"i suggested Ihe pla/a area." Cuts said, "A 
SSOO.OW) tontrihuiuin Irom die university wtiuld 
help (0 pay tor some i>( the cusis The Union would 
also eoniributc equally The funding would ihen 



etMiic Irom both " 

The sculpture proposal also liiecd other ques- 
tions akiut the funding. In a proposal aeccptanee 
leller to hiis frmn John [airman, assistant vice 
president for unncrsity relations, ij was suggested 
that the sculpture be used as a centerpiece to ree- 
ugni/c donors lor a given university fund-raising 
campaign. 

l'(iH mcmlxTs said they wanted to kmm if the 
KSL! Alumni AsstKiutum was planning io take 
donations fur the sculpture or if it would he a giR Io 
ihe Union. Pitts plans to relay U(iH membcnt' con- 
cerns to I he Alumni Association and a'spond at Ihc 
next meeting 

Other business included a a'pori on the Union 
enhancement project Puts s;ud the 'Wl-pcrcenI con- 
siruction drawings were heing approved with 
exception to the critical piiih design 

<)ncc approved the remaining U) perceni of 
dravMngs would be lurned in With final approval, a 
general contractor would be' hired 

"Anvund laic March, the bcgmning of April, we 



should sex' .some conslruction on the project." Pills 
said, "Wc can now sec some light at the end of the 
tunnel." 

Presentatiuns lo univcritity slalT will be 
underway this week to help answer concerns for 
space and services that will be hindered during 
construction. Pills said 

Commerce Hank will be invited to revisit the 
U(iB Executive Cummillee on Mondiiy. concern- 
ing the previou.sly proposed check-cashing fee 1 he 
Executive Committee will then give a recommen- 
dation to the general body at the following meeting 

A letter requesting bids for the space allocated 
in the Union enhancemeni project fur a burger 
establishment has been sent out All foinl services 
registered with the Kiley County Health 
Ueparimcnt were contacted and the deadline to 
respond is Nov 7 

Pitts said a decision on a burger eslablish- 
menl should be made arounil Dee. 12, afler 
mandatory site visits and interviews with those 
responding. 



Parking Services aids K-State-Salina with advice, equipment 



lANDON TMWNT 

Parking problems at K-Siaie- 
.Salina are getting some needetl atten- 
tion. 

Parking Services is helping K- 
Slalc-Salina t>rgani/e a parking coun- 
cil and set up new regulations and 
guidelines in order lo coravt iho 



PIZZA 

SHUTTLE 

DELIVER! 

77»7 

\ 1 800 Claflin Road 



problems 

Kim Sanchez, olTice assistant tor 
fiscal alTairs at K -State-Sal ma. said 
pari of the problem is K -State-Sal ina 
only has 72lt students Studeiu piirk- 
ing permits cost only SI 7. laculiy 
and staff permits cost S2N. 

Sanchez siiid this lack of revenue 
has drastically hurt some of the park- 
ing lots 

"We have a Im of areas thiii have 
deieriorated so ilies can't be do- 
ignaicd as parking lots, sti they 
I K -Si ale Parking Services! are 
helping us find ways to get fund- 




5 



•reserve dry ice 
•Face paimt* 
gruesome appliance 

^ •CBSTUMtS' 

|D^ *Masks* 

^PMUCH MORE. 
T>37-2002^IN AGCIEVILLi 



mg." Sanchez said 

Darwin Abbott, director of 
Parking Service!^, said raising funds 
could be dilTicult because ux relief 
and raising tuition aren't options. 
according to K-State rules and 
Kansas laws He also said although 
K-State-Saltna plans to raise the 
price of permits to a level consis- 
lenl with prices at K- Stale's main 
campus, this extra revenue wouldn't 
be enough to correct Ihe situation. 
Sanchez said K-Stale-Salina is 
looking at possible donation opportu- 
nities fnmt businesses in the Salina 
area 

l.anee Lunsway, opera- 
tions manager of Parking 
Services. said although 
Parking Services at the 
Manhattan campus has limiicd 
funds and wxm't be able lo 
help much financially, il is 




helping in other ways. 

Lunsway said K-Stalc has painted 
parking stall lines and given old lot 
designation signs lo K-Stale-Salina to 
help control some of the problems 

"They've had problems with peo- 
ple parking in the grass." Lunsway 
said 

Lunsway added that they are 
reviewing how many parking stalls 
need to be designated as handicapped 
stalls and meter stalls. 

Abbott said Parking Services pur- 
chased a new computer server for 
S.S.OOtl. He said the strser has been 
needed fi^r a 'vhile and will allow K- 
S tale- Salina to work more closely 
with Parking Services and the rest ol 
K -State 

Abbott also said K-State has given 
two portable ticket machines to K- 
State-Salina in order to curb some of 
Ihe problems 





1 4 



Jf FT C0OHa/r_dl.gian 
JACK HUIAN, tacilitiei cuitodion, cleam the windows on a door at Willord Hall Monday 
morning 



jJa 



Worth 
Catching 



ra 



Forgot class? 
Don't forget 
the news. 

lion.ksu.edu 




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Pay resident 

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STUDYABROAP. 

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finding out about the range of programs available. 



Oct. 8 
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7:00-8:30 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




TUESDAY 



OCTOBER 28 



19 9 7 




D scon 

D. KOn FRfTCHEN i a i^HM 
in nnoii ccKivmunicaiioni Vou con 
»nd ^hit D-fnail fa Scoff gi 



D(cWe V may be 

irritating, but he*s 
good for hoops 

Wi Kallowecn, and Dick Vtialc is 
coming lo town. 

Don'l be afraid of Dickie V. Don't 
cringe at the sight »i this manX presence 
when he walkji onto ihc court in 
Bramlage Col i^: urn on ThurMliiy nighi 
Don't run out lo Ihi' parking lot with 
your fingers dug into your cars, scream- 
ing and ranting and raving after Dickie 
V breaks open K-State's ha.<ikctball sea- 
son with a patented "It's time for bas- 
ketball, babv'" 

If 
theiie is a 
single 
personali- 
ty who is 
synony- 
mous with 
a sport, 
il'sVitale 
and col- 
lege 
hoops. 
Dick 
Vitale is 
the 
ambassador of college basketball. 

He's obnoxious. He's hyper. His bald 
head casts the same reflection under flu- 
orcsccnt lighls thai a kiskclhull ditcs. 
He's controversial because he's earned 
as many enemies as loyalists, but he 
doesn't let it Nether him 

Vitale visits a hundred colleges each 
year. He brings to life stadiums and col- 
iseum.s packed full of college students 
who thrive on college basketball 

Students who buy his basketball pa-- 
view maga/tne also practice Vitale s 
piercing voice while silting with fnends 
watching KSPN on Thursday nights, wd 
can't wait until March Madness, when 
college hoops transforms into the 
monthlong Dickie V Marathon. 

Thursday night, Dickie V u ill be in 
town K-State's band will be playing 
The cheerleaders will be jumping and 
kicking, and there will be Vitale sur- 
rounded by students and tans dressed in 
purple. He will bnng life lu a basketball 
program that must rebound this season. 

Coach Tom Asbury agrees. He does- 
n't say he loves Dickie V. but he doesn't 
hate him either Asbury knows Vitale 
will bring a message lo K- Stale basket- 
ball Subtract Vitale's verbiage and 
aggressive style and all of the iake-it-ii>- 
the-hoop- baby's and what you ha\e is a 
TV commentator who knows college 
basketball like Marv Albert knows 
garter belts 

Vitale is wacky, but he's not cra/y. 

"Like I tell our players." Asbury said, 
"don'l listen to how he says it, but what 
he says You may not like his antics or 
demeanor or the way things come out. 
but he's done a g(H>d job promoting col- 
lege basketball around the country and 
around the world" 

It still IS not clear why Dick Vitale is 
coming to Manhattan. Kan Asbury 
pointed to Mike O'Brien. K-Stalc's 
associate athlelic director of develop- 
ment O'Brien called Viialcand request- 
ed his presence at K-Siate to speak lo a 
basketball program coming ofTa 10-17 
record 

There is only one Dick Vitale There 
ate a million colleges. Lawrence is right 
down the direct Show me the money, 
baby'.' 

"I thought It would be a good thing 
for our basketball program," Asbury 
said. "He doesn't come free, cither, but 
I don't en peel him to." 

What Asbury expecLs Vitale to do is 
spread the message of winning to K- 
State's basketball team He wants the 
college basketball ambassador to spark 
a program the way only he knttws how 

Vitale vmII yell into television cam- 
eras, "It's Ayome May, bab>i He's the 
junior from Lancaster. Texas, baby! 
He's the money-maker who will lead the 
Wildcats to the promised land come 
March, baby!" 

The vein on his sweat-beaded fore- 
head will begin to pop out. You will grab 
the nearest grocery hag and pray the 
nachos you ate six mmutes ago don't 
come back up The band will play 
"Wabash Cannonball" and the basket- 
ball team will line up and shoot lay-upc. 
hoping to improve on 3 H -percent shoot- 
ing from the field, which they shot last 
year. 

With each ball that goes through the 
hoop, Vitale's voice will grow louder, 
because with every made basket comes 
another roar from fans and another 
adrenaline rush for Vitale. 

Some fans will leave ITiursday night 
thinking Vitale is an even bigger idiot in 
person than on television Others will be 
so pumped up lor basketball season that 
they'll aM the word "biby" to the ef>d 
of every sentence they speak 

Either way, Asbury will conduct his 
rirel public basketball pmciice of the 
ica*on Players will run three-man- 
weavea and will sbooi jump sbuit arid 
lay-ups Maybe someone will even 



One thing is for certain After 
ThuTKlay, Vitale will have made his 
mark in Manhattan, baby. 



Saturday, linebacker Jeff Kelly entered a contest 

of his own: a battle with Sooner fans who 

harassed him because he chose K-State as his 

college football home instead of Oklahoma. 

hostility 

STORY BV SAM FElSENFEtD 

^T^^ -State linebacker Jeff Kelly knew he'd have his work cut oui 
m^ for him going into Saturday's game ul Oklahoma 
m M. ' "' starters, as middle linebacker, he knew n would be 

^ft V' tough having the Sooners' fi-fo(M-5-inch, 2S2-pound center, 
Bruce McClure. coming at him full speed a\\ aftcrmxtn. 

He also knew he'd have it tough trying to contain Oklahoma's option 
masters, quarterback t^ic Moore and running back De'Mond Parker, .i 
llctsman Trophy candidate. 

But the toughest people he had lo face Saturday v^'cren't playing for 
the Sooners. They wea-n'i even sitting on the bench. 

Thc7 were the fans sitting in the stands, and to put things delicately, 
they didn't like him 

Kelly is a subject of controversy in Norman because he backed out of 
a commitment to play vMih the Sooners so he could be a Wildcat instead 

But there's mure to it than that Kelly, who was the top-rated commu- 
nity college linebacker by several publications last season, original ly 
agreed to play for K- State. 

\TiA then he changed his mind and wanted to be a Sooner 

And then he changed his mind and wanted to be a Wildcat again 

He eventually landed with the ( ats, a matter ihat diicsn'l rest easily 
with Sooner fans And they let him know that 

"The crowd came off as very hostile." Kelly said of Saturday's game 

He said the hostility started dunng pre-game warm-ups. and the com- 
ments he heard weren't very polite 

"They said a kit of slufT," he said "\bu know, a lot of family things." 

I^irt of the trouble wnh the situation involved the way he decided to 
be a Wildcat the second time During the week leading up to Saturday's 
game. Oklahoma coaches alleged that K -State coaches impersonated 
Sooners coach John Blake and tricked Kelly while trying io regain his 
services. 

"That's not true at all." Kelly said '"I don'l know where they get that 
There was nothing like that.'" 

Still, the Oklahoma fans were unhappy with him, and apparently, his 
family too. But that's line with Kelly His family was at the gatne the 
fust time they've seen him play Division I- A ftMlball 

He said he's happy to have played well in a v iclory in front oi his par- 
ents. And he credits, ironically, the Oklahoma fans who said impolite 
things about Mom and Dad Kelly He said the heckling was far from 
bothersome 

"1 took that to mv advantage," be said "I ujicd that to help me plav 
hard" 

The Cats* 1U-1 victory was their filth consecutive win over the 
Sooners a sign of a turnaround, one team on the rise and the other on 
the decline Atlcr all. even with the live-game losing streak. Oklahoma 
still leads the all-time H'ries 6.VI^-4 

Historically, the SiHUicrs have had K -State's number But not in this 
decade, perhaps one of the reasons Kelly wears purple, not crimson 

Kelly's not worried about any traditions, though He's jusi happy the 
(. aLs improved to ti-l on the season, and that he'll never liave to play m 
Oklahoma again unless the teams meet in the Big 12 championship 
game next year 

"With all the bickering going on about where I was going to school. 
at K-Slate or OU, it was a great personal win for me," he said. 

He was also happy with his decision to play for the Cats Now that 
he's seen, and heari the fans in Norman, he's glad he plays his home 
games at KSU Stadium 

"Nothing compares to the fans in Manhattan." he said. 




curnuMUio ^i.j 
UNEftACKER JEFf KEIIY signals (or g sofety ogomst Oklahoma receiver J. T THotchar on Soturdoy in K-Slate i 2d '" viaory I "^e play 
was not ruled a sofety, and OU hod the ball spotted on the 3*yord line. 




Looking back at Lon 

-Wildcat coach, player enjoying success at 



inoi 




Although K-State's men's basketball team 
didn't reach the NCAA Tournament a 
year ago, K- State had a representative. 
It alio had one in the 1994 Final Four 

While live Wtldcab 
weren't there, one of the 
most famous Wildcats 
was. University of 
Illinois head basketball 
coach Lon Kruger has 
taken the path through 
K-Stale 10 become one 
of the most succcss5il 
college basketball cuach- 
ei in the country. 

After being away 
from K -Stale, Kruger said he has some great 
memories 

There arc so many. My favorite memory 
goes hack to the teammates I played with," he 
said. "I maintain close contact and commumca- 
lion with basically all of them. The opportunity 
to play for CoKh |Jack| Hartnun was an 




Kfug«r 



absolutely terrific experience," 

Kruger arrived at K -Stale m l*)70 and began 
playing in the '7 1 -'72 season, bccau.sc freshmen 
weren\ allowed to compete at the time. He is 
14th on K -State's career scoring list, and is one 
of only two Wildcats to be named the Big 
Fight's Playef-of-lhc-Vear twice 

Kruger was an assistant lor legendary coach 
Hartman, for whom he alw played, starting in 
I'lTK He stayed uniil I9S2, wlicn he accepted 
the bead coaching job at Texas-Pan American. 
W hen Hartman retired in IVSft, Kniger replaced 
bis former coach, 

Kruger said it was special for him to come 
back to couch at K-Stalc. 

"You can never feel about another school 
like you do your alma mater," Kruger said. 

Kruger was at K-Staic for four years, and is 
the only coach to lead the Cats to foiv-consecu- 
tivc NCAA Tournament trips He was also the 
nrst coach to win 20 games in his finl cam- 
paign. 

He led the 1987-88 team to the Midwest 



Kcgional Finals before losing to eventual 
national champion Kansas. 

He then went to the University of Ronda in 
1990, where he took a team that was stmgglmg 
to the Final Four in only four yeai^ 

"At Kansas State, the challenge was lo matn- 
lain the tradition," Kruger said "The oppimuni- 
ty al Florida presented a totally diffencni chal- 
lenge They were in turmoil with the NCAA 
investigation and die FBI scandal. To sec players 
come tn thea- and conduct Ihentselvcs in a way 
to totally chance the perception people had of 
Florida basketball .. there was satisfaction in 
that" 

Kruger said going to die Final Four wis a 
special c)tperiei»cc, one that he wished the '88 
K -State team could have expenenced 

"The players nieshed extremely well togeth- 
er." he said. "In Florida, we realized how much 
vw missed by being only a game short if> '88 " 

He left Florida for Illinois m 19%, where he 
replaced another retiring legend, Lou Henion 

"The opportunity (o get bick to the Midwest, 



where basketball is really sipificant and excit- 
ing, was really appealing," he said 

In his first season at Illinois last year, the 
team compiled a 22-10 record and reached the 
second round of l he NCAA Tournameni a year 
af^cr the team missed the loumamem aliogether 

Although be is happy at Illinois, Kiugcr says 
there are .some things he mis,ses about K-Stalc. 

"I mm the ties to the tradition." he said "At 
Illinois, for instance, I'm aware, but I don'l real- 
ly feel what happened 1 5 years ago like 1 did ai 
Kansas Slate " 

Looking back on more successftil tunes at 
K- State, he fondly recalls the gim days >»i the 
h«sketball pnignm and the almosphca- sur- 
rounding It 

"Another memory is the unbelievable atmos- 
phere and rabid support of the fans in (\hearn as 
a player, and in Ahearn and Bramlage .^s .i 
coach. The fans there were very special," he 
said. "Aheara had that special quality where 
people just viflcnt m there cupectmg to make it 
lock. It wu t great bonK-court advantage " 



STOHY ev DAN MERKES 



Men's crew faring well despite tight budget 




iMOUn RYMt 

,t«ll fp^KiTTft 

Like every other athlete who 
competes on a K -State athletic 
team, the men who make up the 
rowing team 
pav a price. 

Unlike 
most teams, 
however, 
this team 
actually has lo pay money lo 
supptirl Itself because il is not a 
recognized varsity sport It is a 
club sport. 

Each member of ihc team 
has lo pay SMO for dues each 
scmeslCT. The dues go toward 
purchasing equipment and 
other vanout fees the team has 
to pay, Coach Al Koch said. 

Members also have to pay 
an additional fee for travel 
apeuei, and ibey participate 



in fund-raisers each year. 

Despite the financial obliga- 
tion, Koch's crew is the largest 
it has been in the past five years 
with 22 varsity rowers and Ife 
nwice rowers However, KiK'h 
did say die team does lose row- 
ers because the athletes can't 
afford it 

Because there is very link- 
high schiwl rowing in Kansa,s, 
Koch doesn't recruit his rowers 
at the lake but instead on cam- 
pus. Most of the Riwers on the 
team were a-cruiled at trcsh- 
man orientation, fee payment 
and All-University Open 
House 

The crew team it split into 
three diviiiont ~ lightweight, 
open, and heavyweight. The 
lightvktiglB eomiiti of men of 
160 potindf and leas, and the 
hcavywcigtil is men who wvigh 



more than 1 6(1 pounds ' 

The open division is 
described by Koch as the 
"cream of the crop" because 
there arc no weight rcslnctions 
Koeh has been happy so far 

"They're both lopcn and 
lightweight) very good crews," 
Koch said "They work hard 
and they get along, that's I he 
two bcsi things I can hope for 
Ihey have the mo.st potential 
I've ever coached." 

The varsity crew practices 
from 5:45 to 7 45 am five days 
a week m the fall and spnng. 
The novice crew practices 
from 5 to 6:45 p.m. on Uic same 
dayo. 

If you're interested in ftnd- 
ing out more about the men's 
niwmg team or u ish to join Ihc 
team conlact Al Koch at 537- 
1452. 



Dorodnova loses to ranked 
player at Indiana, takes 2nd 



<:> 



XMl WMni 

K-State tennis playo" Ykm Dorodnova kept 
her hoi stieak alive over ttie weekend as she 
advanced to the first -place match in the lloosicr 
(lassie in Bloom ingi on, Ind 

However, top -seeded 
IXirodnova was noi able to 
continue the hot streak all the 
way through as she fell in the . '^ 
thampuuiship match to f 
Barhani Navarro of Baylor 
The No 2 seed Navarro, who is currently ranked 
39lh tn the nation, defeated Dorodnova 6-}, J-6, 
7-5. 

Ahead 4-2 in the third set, Dorodnova began 
to give way to Navarro, losing five out of the last 
six games 

Head coach Steve Bielau said the champi- 
onship win was within IXirodnova's reach, but 
she let it slip away. 



"She lost focus and made sonK mistakes Ihat 
cost her the match," be said. 

Dorodnova 's first siep on the road lo the 
championship match was a 6- 1 , f»-2 thra.shing of 
Indiana's Jessica Anderstm in the lirsi round. 
She then dispensed of Baylor's Hortensia 
Hernandez 6- 1 , 6-2, to advance to ihe final. 

Dorodnova 's second -place finish in the 
Hoosicr Classic followed her nuisianding per- 
formance in the Arizona Stale Im nalional Oct 
1 1 and 1 2. In the Arizona Stale lav itatinnal. she 
kniKked off two nationally ranked opponents en 
route to the ihird-pluce match 

Playing m the second Hight ol the tourna- 
ment, senior Lena Pitiptchak won her final 
match of the tourtumcnt with a thinl-place win 
over Ana Ccrctto of Indiatu Pilipichak defeated 
Ccretto .1-6, 6-3, 6-3 in the third-place match 

Piliptchak defeated Kcndra Howard of 

See TINMS Page I 



" Wl'''»<j l 




AU EUTCKI 
KWYOtmON 

•-mail axyMHiidii 



KANSAS STATE COLIEGIAN 




T U 



A Y 



DAI LYcross word 

ACROSS hurdle 

1 Kkigston 43 Its shell Is 
Trk) song hig^)ly toxic 
4 My friend's 48 Peruvian 
name- current 

aakes? 47 "— UMe 
9 Petrol Teapof 

12 It does the 48 Andy 
hole )ob Capp's 

13 Put an hangout 
and to 49 Israeli 

14 Kyrgyzstan premier, 
city 1969-74 

15 Net>ras' 54 Odysseus' 
ka's state 



flower 

17 Meadow 

18 Rushmore 
HgufB 

IS Sacurities 

org, 
21 Yaar-end 

quaff 

24 Wilde- 
t)«ests 

25 Tlc-tac- 
toe lo«9 

aSDalatMJ 
MBtaf|0s 
aiWhsreto 

get a date 
aSFlop 
35 Brine hert 
34 — the hills 

(ar>ctenl) 
38 Acquire 

40 fasten 

41 Pre- 
diploma 



rescuer 

55 Eero's dad 

56 Monoklnl's 
lack 

57 Small low 
Island 

SB Poker ploy 10 Cruising 

58 Entreat 1 1 Cager 



DOWN 

1 Periodical, 
tjrielly 

2 Wild card, 
maybe 

3 Every last 
lota 

4 Raiders' 
target. 
maytie 

5 Failed to 
tottow suit 

6 Scratch 

7 "With — in 
My Hearf 

8 Fanlycars 

9 "She 
Stoops to 
Conquer 
writer 



Solutton tline: 27 mln. 




Saturday's antiiMr 



10-20 



O'Neal. 
tamiliarly 
16 Walter's 
successor 

20 Sought 
damages 

21 Montreal 
athlete 

22 Puck- 
passer's 
target 

23 0datsopus 
27 Grooved 

on 

29 Rival of 
B|om 

30 Dispatched 
a dragon 

32 Long skirt 
34 Makes up 

one's mind 
37 Planned 

Parenthood 

proponent 
39 Mexican 

entree 
42 "BreacT 

44 Muppet 
eagle 

45 It's a long 
story 

46 Silver, to 
ak^emists 

50 XIII quad- 
rupled 

51 Recede 

52 Dander 

53 Erstwhile 
garment 



1* r i H4 i « 7 t mn lo 


m' 1" 


21 22 23 ^1^ H^tari 


ie H 41 IP - ^ !F !P 




S7 Hu ■«» 



CTFIUQCn^ For answar? 10 today s crusword. calT 

vlUmrCUi i-soo-tM-earaiadcparrTvnuitf.tciucn- 

tone / notiry phonM (^ft* on<y.) A Wnp Featimg lir^fce, hffc 



10-20 



CRVPTOQUIP 



TYQU TNGG UACXNUAW 

CNMA KAWU ZIC UYANC 

KCAQMZQWU? IQMXAQG. 
Saturday's Cryptociiilp: I FIND MOST OPERA TRY- 
OUTS ARE PURELY A MATTER OF TRIAL AND ARIA. 

Today's Cryptoquip due: M equals K 

I CftYPTOQUIP BOOH 2t Send $4.50 (checWm.o.) to 
I rfvntnriA««ir« Rnn«( ? PORniAAII RivoftnnKJ inAnTT 



ADhoc 







f**ir Do»'r H4vf 



Helping DB92 talk shows survive 

Statidn manager 
changes formal 



KOTT AIDIS-WKSON 

li jliiuot tlidii'l survive ittlii this semester, but 
■A Pnr|>lc AJV;iir" wi kSl)H-KM *»l y is Imk and 
iiictirtliiig t(i the people behind il. is better than 
oer. 

I lining chaniied the !(tatiun'<> format, station 
iiijiiat;er I, en hilillo MiJ s«imc faculty members 
Mtinteil to eliininiilc the talk shows allogclher 
( filics saw the opinion-based shi>ws as a clash 
v^illi lite higher tempo musical formal. 

f'»t|illi> consittercd the shows in need of 
change, nol annihilation. MiKleliiig the radio lalk 
shitws a Her their more tnerjietie television coun- 
lerparls, l\ilill« s;iid the goal was to make the 
host l.ike less of a "radio personal iiy" role and 
a>suine more of a "host m«liator" role toward the 
gtk'si or uiicsis on the show 

"A Purple AMair" aired Monday through 
Indav III tlic past the show has now been split 
into two shows, "t'amptis Life" ntw covers issues 
specific to k-Sialc on Wcitivesdays. The new "A 
Purple .Mfair" broadcasts on Monday and 
I hurst lay and focuses more on genera t-inierest 
issues ,ind eiuerlainnieiH Hoth shows air from 5 
unlit i> p ni 

\ccordiiig lo stalFcrs Kelly Flynn. junior in 
aduTtising, and Jeremy Clacys, sophomore in 
poliiical S4'ience and electronic journal ism, the 
ch.mgcs have made ".\ Purple All'air" a better 
show Ihe show being cut hack was the most 
ohv lous change 

"Ue were mad at first, hul il turned out to be 
a blessing." Ilynn^id 

( lacys said he agreed "We have time to book 
real shows iind make s4imething we can be proud 
■ it." be said 

I Ic said with the extra time between shows. 
guests are easier lo b(H)k and will now be a con- 
stant feature instead of ha^ ing oeea&ioniil guests 
as in past scniesiets. 

Ilvnn described ihc original format as 
"alviays Ivvo people finng otT their opinions." 
With (he new setup, she said the staff wanted to 
move .may I mm thai 

It's not about us." ( lueys said "Wc don't 



want it to be ahtiiil us " 

Potillo said he also wants 
the stalV on shows like "A 
Purple Atfair" lo be anything 
bul sei m stone 

"I want il to he changmg 
constantly fri>m show io 
shi>w to give everybody an 
opportunity to be on the air," 
Potillo said 

Claeys said not only di>cs 
having guests make the show 
better listening, but the 
guests are certainly more 
qualified lo discuss (he day's 
topic than ihe co-hosts alone 

"We want to moderate 
instead of beanng ihe brum 
of the discussion We want 
professionals to do that." 
t'lacys suid "We jusi want to 
gel the information out on 
both sides of the issues 1 1 
adds credibility to ihe show " 

Another change ihat was- 
n't exactly planned, Hynn 
said was the live remote 
crew with Tim Pelt/er and 
Aaron fish traveling around 
Manhattan lo gather local 
opinmns. 

"It was very sp^intancous, bul I think il was a 
good idea," llynn said 

The remote crew travels around in a car that 
lish .md Itll/cr painted lime green It has been 
dubbed "Ihc Magic Myslcrv Machine" 

'Tim IS our wild man on slatf Me'll do an>- 
thing you ask." Klynn said. She said the advan- 
tage behind such a remote crew cimtes when the 
show tackles a sensitive i.ssue 

"We'll have a break in the seriousness with 
Tim and Aaron," Klynn said. 

Some things will remain the same "A Purple 
Affair" will siill broadcast live from the third 
floor of McCain Auditorium "A Purple AlVair" 
will siill welcome callers during the sh«tw. but 




JIREMY CUIYS, 

iOphofflore tn 
electronic journoliim 
and political icience, 
discusioi issuev 
dealing wild HIV with 
Helly flynn, |unior in 
advert) II rvg Claeyt 
and Flynn ar« the 
hosti lor Purple Aflaii, 
0HKSDB-FM9I 9. 



curnuMioio 



llicv Will now be screened before going on ihc air 
and will he limited lo two calls per guest 

,\s tor the future, I'otitio said with local com- 
mercial st.itions uandermg with lomiai choices. 
"Dtw; basically owns ihe urban and aliernatne 
lorinal Id like us to become more ot a torce lo 
nval the commercial stations and continue to 
make them a little nervous" 

Potillo s;iid he IS dedicating this semester to 
"getting the kinks out of every thing." and getting 
Ihe sia If accustomed lo the formal c lunges before 
be tries to increan' deparimeni funding and pos- 
sibly begin negoiiattons lor a siution nun c 

C lacys siiid ihe commodny "\ Purple Aflair" 
needs IS more applicants tor the nrsearch and 
writing stair 



DUMN DU-Rfltt^^ '^Oi. '90ii.tit^ 



Review 



i 



LANDONnMwnr 

Ihc 'Hlls were mrtonous for one-hit wonders Only a 
lew bamls were able tti cross into the '*>!( without losing 
(heir trademark sounds. 

Duran Duran seems lo have had the tougheft 
nvid, however. Never being a favorite band of eni- 
1CS in the music industry, dealing with a bfcak-up 
and going through as many group members as they 
had hairstyles. Ouran Duran has emerged onec 
again in the thick of things 

I livy are a trio once again Bassist and fouiuling 
niember John laylor has leH Duran Duran to pulque dif- 
lerent musical interests ( inly the vtKals of Simon LeBon 
and the keyboards of Nick Khudcs remain from the origi- 
nal group ['A -Missing Persons guitarist Warren 
(. uccurullo rounds oui the gmup 

I )uran Durans new release, "Meda/yaland," stays true 
til ihc group's relentless pursuit of pioncenng dilTerent 
d Heel tons for riH'k. 

\\'hcn tirst listening to the album, it was a hit of a 
shoek I actually checked the compact diH' player to make 
sure I had the right disc in 

J he ovemll sound of "Mi-da//aland" is a mix betwven 
k'choo. uiduslrial, riK'k and electronic The music WiLS 
woven together m a way that made me VMindcr if I was in 
ihc 'KOs Of the ''tis After hsientng on. I really didn't care. 
Il was calchy 

The second track. "Big Hang (feneration." proved to 
me It was indeed Duran Duran Ihe sivng started uui with 
a carmval-ndc snuiid along with 1 elkm's crix>ning voice 
and loopy lyrics, "falling into space. At the end of time, 



^ 



Mack as the black in your eyes. Staring through a hole in 
the o/onc There's nobody home, to plav b.ick vmir 
answer-phone." Ihis song was like riding a carousel wiih 
strobe lights. Al the end I got back in line lor .mulher ride 
The third track, "Klectric Haiharella." is a tribute i" 
Jane Fonda's cuh-hit movie. "Harb.ircll.i." which is 
where Duran Duran humd ik o.unc I his song is ihc 
eurrcnl release and can be head on K.SDU-I M »)l '* 
Inventive keyboard and guitar riffs really make 
this another fun s<mg lo dance to I hice again, I eltoti 
has fun with the lyrics as he sings abiuit .i man- 
nequin making Ihe perfect girlliiend 

The lourth track, "Out ()l My Mind" was 
released earlier thi.s summer on "I he Saint" si»undirack 
This song IS the closest you can gel lo the stunuls of the 
band's last album of original music If you can imagine 
being in love and walking ahine on the watery streets of 
Venice during a pleasiint snowlall. you can probably 
imagine how the s«)ng goes Another w initer 

Other songs like "SiKa Hahi " "lie My Icon." "Hiined 
in the Sand " atid "So Long Suicide ' score high on this 
album. 

When 1 first heard "Sdva Malo, I thought 1 w,is lis- 
tening to Nine Inch Nails The only di( Terence was I rem 
Re/nor would have sung aboui sonicihiiig dismal and 
numcd the song Rusted I rooked Malo " 

Another song I really enjoyed was "Midnight Sun " It 
incorporates a cello and has a slow Kat (hat is entrancing 
LeKon's vinals in this song are iiicsmcn/ing and will pull 
you in all Ihe way If you are sad the siing will siiund s,id 
If you are happy, the stmg will K' pleasaiii .md rclaving 
"Mcdavsihnii" is one of those albums that can catch 




you olf guard ai lirst but really grows on you tkst If you 
hkc new sounds for techno, dancing, cra/y lyncs or are 
just a rabid Duran Dur;in fan, you should enjoy the album 
If you don't tall into any of those categories, gne it a try 
You lUst inighl hi.' surprised 

If you get the chance. I reconiMend a visit lo 
"Meda/zalaivd " It's like going to Disney World. There are 
ions of things to enji^ and explore. 



God Street Wine encourages listeners to ponder issues 



■s 

3 



Ne\t time you pack your bags tor a 
n»ad tnp. he sure to ihnM in "(iod 
Street W'iik' 'on Mercury Rcxords It's 

an album to slip into yiHir ct)mpact 
disc player when you leel the need lo 
take a drive and think aK>ul life 

The self-titled album blends the 
sounds ol the .MIman brothers. Hlues 
Traveler and Tom fVtly to create a somber 
mode ol htuesy relaxation. 



Review 



^ 



Be sure to give "A tiwid Dream" a lis- 
ten. It reminisces about a past relationship 
colored with fond memories. As 
reality approaches, the brilliant hues 
uf love dim to black. Listen to the col- 
orful metaphors and remember that 
btig-luii love, ur maybe just that 
feeling. 

If ihis dntg.s you down too much. 

try 'Happy Birthday. Mr President" 

It picks up the tempo a bit Tap along to the 

strong mi?i of guitar, buss and drums This 



light ditty spvMks ol ,in eternal president to 
save the day. comparing the president to a 
supeihero Whether or nol President 
C'iinion wears a cape and tites through ihe 
air. It reveres the president as a figure 
respected lor his healing and problem 
solving loiisidcr your role as a eiti/en 
and your reu'ieuce tor national leaders 
This song might anger you or perhaps 
inspire you to take a more active role in 
governntent. 

The five- member band givcti this 



album a splash ot con.seienee, a little reli- 
gion and a touch of emotion Its thoughi- 
prov oking lyrics question mkisI concerns, 
such as the role of Ihe president, but in a 
light manner Ihe lynei> encourage Ikstcn- 
en to think about tlieir nation, about 
their loved ones and about themselves. 

Take a liitle time to ponder the issues 
(iod Street Wine presents, intermixed «mh 
some suave instrumentals The combina- 
tion works well for this bond us it has for 
other groups of blues-mriucnced nxk 



NUMBER9 



DILBERT 




I OlSCOVtREO THM OUR 
POINT Y-WAlRtD BOSS 
DOESN'T KNOW HC'S BEING 
INSULTtO IF 'fOU SM 
I -WITH ALL out RESPECT 



J 






UlTM KU DUE RESPECT, 
15 THW yOUR FACE OR 

ta A r^ONKE^ CLI^^BlN& 

OOLON VOUR COLLAR 
HEADFIRST? 





U .. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1997 




DUST RISES oi 

Potnek Blonko, 
employes of the 
Farmoii Co-Op of 
Monhofton, unloodl 
joybeonj Mondoy 
morning ol 
Shellenoerger Holl 



JiFf coom 

Coflegiofl 



Greeks to participate in Fright Night II 



coumMiti 

Fraicmjijcs and snrnritics will spon- 
sor Halloween rcsiivilios for children on 
Bramlagc Coliseum'^ concourse he I ore 
Fnght Night II bcjiins ThurMlay. 

Greeks will hand oui candy and 
s-pon<ior pumpkin colonng, ctxikic da- 
orating and a haunted house, Lindscy 
Roy, Panhellcnic t ouneil metnbcr and 
coordinator of ihc event, said al 
Monday's I'anhcllenic t'ouncil meeting. 
The council governs II ol' K-Slatc's 
soronlics. 

"It will give kids a safe, vvann envi- 
ronment to go trick-or-trealing." Roy 
said. 

The activities begin at fi.ltl p m and 



run until K when Ihe Fright Night pro- 
gram hc^ms. F right Nighi lets fans meet 
K-State men's and women's basketball 
teams. 

This IS the first year greeks v^-ill help 
with Fright Night. The idea of the greek 
system W()rktng wuh the Dcparitncni of 
Inlercollcgialc Athletics and KAT 
board came out of a desire to increase 
participation in Fright Ni^hl and pro- 
vide greeks with a philanthropy 

"We're doing this lo give hack to the 
Manhattan community." Roy said 
■'We'll promote our image while doing 
somethmg gwid for the community" 

Thirty-fi\e btmth!i. including s^tme 
s|K)nsored by residence halls and busi- 
nesses, will be at the event as well. Rov 



said The booths are designed to give 
more options and more participation to 
the children, she said Free T-shirts will 
be given lo the lirsi IJHHl people who 
arrive. 

The main Fnght Night program fea- 
tures an appearance by ESPN basketball 
commentator t)ick Vitalc. skits and 
scrimmages by the basketball teams, 
basketball contests for fans. Willie the 
Wildcat, the Classy Cats, cheerleaders 
and a Dick Vitale sound-alike contest 

The greek chapter with the bighc^i 
percentage of members at Fnght Night 
w ins a Dick Vitale autt^raphed basket- 
ball, which will be awarded at the Nm. 
1 7 women's basketball game. 



Tennis 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

Arkansas 6-2, 6-4 in the Finit 
round She then had a ft- 3, 6-4 

loss to Indiana's Christy Sharp in 
the second round. kni>cktng her 
into the ihird-place match 

llietuu said Piliplchak's per- 
formance, cspcctally her serve, 
was very solid 

"She beat some quality oppo- 
nents, and had as impressive per- 
formance as anyone on the team," 
he said 

The C ats' second player in the 
lop Highl of the tournament, fresh- 
man .'\nna Pampoulova. finished 
m sixth place with a final match 
loss to Anda'a Ho from Arkansas. 
She was defeated 6-2, 6-.V 

Pampoulova lost t» Baylor's 
Hemandcv f>-4, h-4 in the first 
round, but she Jcteatcd Jessica 
Anders«)n of Indiana 6-1, S-7, <\- 1 
to advance to the JlHh-place match 

Freshman Fva Novolna tiKik 
fifth place in the second llight 
with a 6-1, 4-6. 7-5 win over 
Kendru Howard of .Arkansas. 

Novotna lost her I'lrNt round 
match lo Louise Ostling of 
Arkansas 6-4. .1-6. 6-3. In the 
consolation bracket, Novotna 
d e I e at cd Hay I or 's Sophie 
( ioldschmidt 6- 1 , ft- .3, to advance 
to the fifth-place match 

The Wildcats now turn their 
attention to the highlight of the 
fall season, the Rolex Regional 
Championships in Omaha, Nek, 
from tk't. 2^ to Nov 2. 

Hiciau said the II nosier 
t lassie was a gi>od preparation 
lor the Rolcx Regional 
Championships 

"For the most part, we're beat- 
ing the people we should beat, and 
as we're progressing, were get- 
ting some qujiity wins," he said. 
"I feel good going into the RoIck " 




All the news that's fit to be online. 
collegian.ksu.edu 



I /\ y ( ) I I- -.1 I V". ( >!■ I /\l 



/\ I H I* A^\ 



I I 11 /NY t M f- .1/ V-. ( >!■ l/\l |( J/VA/V /\ I fi I * /V\ Wrt'lU^t'liM'fll' 

$i PITCHERS ??^M' 



IN AGGIEVILLE SINCE 1913 



Olson's Shoe 
Service 



• A Variety of BIRKENSTOCK. 

TtM of If ln«l comfort ihoi, 

• Shoe & Boot Repair 



Bintan 



1214 Moro 




539-8571 



CERTIFIED PEDORTHIST 



I O F L J r-^ M 



$1 Draws 



$1 Margaritas 
$2 Coronas 



WEP 



STRIP NIGHT 
III IS BACK!!! 

V*8oi. K.C. Sfrtp $5^ 
- 16o2. K.C. Strip $8*^ 
14oi. T-Bone $6" 
Black Jack Specials $2 
$2'" BIG BOBS 

Karaoke Contest Every 
Wed. 9p,m.-lo,m. 



11t,l.t»y I-, 




Put Big $$$ 

in Your Schedule 

$7. so/Hour* 

InmcdlsU Evmbig Opeaings for 
OiitbMMl Tdcsaks 




77#-sooe 



3234 Kti 




in MvMIni SwIoH 



•VMtataMtfM 



s.s$s$ss$s$$s$$ssss^^ 



, a^i^lillriVV^inriinnnrVrinn^* 



%S$$S$$$$$$$$SS 




$ 
$ 

s 
s 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
s 
$ 
s 
s 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
s 
s 
s 
$ 

$ 

% in the Kansas Room, Ramada Inns 

$ Wednesday, Oct. 29 at 6 p.m. $ 

s $ 



% 

s 

s 
s 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
s 
$ 
s 
$ 
$ 
s 
$ 



Starting at $6.50 per hour 

ATTENTION, STUDENTS! 

Help needed to take inventory in retail $ 

stores. Average 10-12 hours, mostly on * 

$ 
$ 
s 
$ 
$ 
$ 



weekends . Weekday mornings also 
available. Math aptitude is a must. 

Apply in person 



Students' dilemma 

New tax credit creates uncertainty 
about when to pay college tuition 



ASSOCJATiD miss 

CONCORD. N H, - Here's a bonus 
maih problem lor college ftL'shmen and 
sophomores; Should siudcnts pay iheir 
spring tuition when it's due in 
IX'ccmbcr'.' Or should they watt until 
Jan. 1 and lake ad\antage of the new 
S 1 ,500 tuition lax ercdil'.' 

Tom Macko, whose son. Tim, t% a 
freshman at Onondaga Community 
College in Syracuse. NY., says the 
answer is easy. "I would probably 
defer lo January I'd be stupid not 
to" 

Not so fast, college administriitor>i 
and tax special i si <i say 

To get the ri^ht ans\^i.'r. students and 
parents need to figure out a few other 
ihing.s first, such as how the student will 
be penali/cd. whether tuition is high 
enough to make it worthwhile; aird if the 
person claiming the deduction is m the 
nghl income bracket 

The one-time-only dilemma facing 
an estimated 4 million freshmen and 
sophomores results fn>m the IIOI'I-: 
Scholarship actually a lax credit 
included in ihe budget deal struck by 
President Clinton and t ongress in July 

Freshmen and sophomores might 
qualify if they pay tuition on or after Jan 
I. IWS But the due dale for spring 
semester tuition at many colleges falls in 
early December 

The HOPt credit poses a dilemma 
for colleges, too 

The Uni\erMty of New Hampshire 
thought about delaying its registration 
deadline until after ihe New Year, but 
decided against ii because it would K' 
too costly, says spokeswoman Carol 
Scndak Students paying alter IX-e 1 1 
will be charged a SKK) late fee 

At Michigan State, students might 
not be able to gel inm the c I as.se s they 
want if they fail to register by the IX'c 
IIJ deadline. 

"As we get closer to the semester, we 
want students to put down the earnest 



money," says university controller David 
Brower. "Us very important for us to 
have Ihe advance information about 
what the enrollments are going lo be so 
we can make adjustments." 

With roughly ft, WW) sophomores, 
Michigan State also faces a crunch in 
processing financial aid for students 
who register after Jan. I, Brower says. 
Still, the univen.ity is considering push- 
ing back the registration deadline just 
this once. 

"We may just throw up our hands and 
wait 111 I afler the first of the year and 
then iry to be flexible w iih parents and 
students," Hrower says 

The IKJPli credit covers 100 percent 
of the first ^ I .IKK J in tuition and manda- 
tory fees, minus scholarship money, and 
50 percent of the ncM SI, WW for'l'irsl- 
and second-year students 

To gel the full credit, a single taxpay- 
er must make enough to pay taxes but 
earn less than S40,tM)t) a year in adjasted 
gross income, while married taxpayers 
must make less than JHIJ,(KK). Singles 
making up to S50.(KN( and couples mak- 
ing up to S1()0,()(KI will get a partial 
credit 

For Tom Maeko. a sixth-grade 
teacher, paying late is the clear choice 

His wife works for a health mainte- 
nance organization and their combined 
income is less than SHIMKMI Tuition lor 
Tim Macko is about %\.Mn each semes- 
ter, so Tom Macko can only lake full 
ad\aniage of the credit if he pays for 
both semesters in tWK 

But his cbiiicc won't cost him a late 
fee. as it will for parents ai other col- 
leges That's because Onondaga, which 
IS pan of the State University of New 
York system, has pushed back its 
tuition due dale from late December lo 
Jan 14 

"We knew students would want to 
take advantage of the credit where they 
could" says college spokeswoman 
Patricia Tort«y. "Is that responsive or 
what',''* 



Ht ik it 



4t 



RESCHEDULED 

FESTIVAL OF 

HEALTH 

l^esday, Oct. 28 
lOsOO A!H - 2KNI PM 

UNIOM COURTYARD 

COME JOIN THE FUN AND 
RECEIVE A WEALTH OF 

FREE 

HEALTH IDEAS 

Flu Shots Available 

SPONSORKI) BY L\FK\K UKAITIJ CKNTER 



♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 




i 



tff^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ J^^^.^^.^,3^^^ w ^iO'^'9i9^^^ vid>^ .■ p ^p -S ^ J -p ^ \j ^ ^ J J 



j^^3i 



Man of 

LaMancha 



SUCtdM AmiUijorium IVcw. 6 - 8 



0« tte tvtaimt at FH^. Noremttr 7, KSV TbeMn ami UbIm 
rood S«rvkc will pmnt a ipeciat dliMr wHIi a "SpAsM dalr" 
bcCwe the prodactloa. Diaaer wiO be tcrvcd ai the BImmom 
itooala thcUaloaat<:ISp.B. Prc-alww estertalflHcat will be 
provtilrd by Dom Qmixatr mmJ Saitcko PmuM. 
Hoctft.' Dick Barter «wl Cliirtottc MacFariud. 

mi: MENU; ^J^tltaioio! 

Tqpas : Chunpinanes AI Homo (Baked Stuffed 

Mushrooms) 
fjuaiada : Gtrboauot Aliiudot (MarUtmed Chick /^toM) 
fntrad""' ^o'lo Con FnitM (Chiciem n^Frutif 

Primerm CofUlli (^rime Rib) 

faella Hurrtana de Murcia {Vegetable Pa^ai 
Adicianah Patalaa Panaderaa (Ovem-roast^ paiMot) 

Puto Maochejo (Zucchbmi, Green P eppen S 

Tomato Medley) 

Juiliaa Penfea Con Ajo (fiarlic (ireem BemtM) 
Posirei. Pudin de Manyana con NatiUaa 

(Appie puddbig w/ tauce) 

Com: S10.9S with bcveri^ 

For DioMr raMrv^tww caH llBMILEllfilLScate ii S3^«SMk 

r»r tkl«ta to tbc MMtcai, call the McCala Bai Office at S32-M2t 
wedidayi b n w n» Naoa aad ft pm, 
UMamcha^kela: » m d w l/wtar Sll 



B*fortUiip«dal 
KSUTkeatn 



by nc 



DEADLINES 

Clouifisd aJi fflusi b« pbc»d 

by noon lh« boy before rtv« 

dote yow wont your od to run 

Ckmified ditploy odi must b« 

plocad bf i p m Iwo working 

doyi pfiot to itw dote you 

wontyour od to tun 



c 






^ 



KANSAS STATE COLIEGIAN 




TUESDAY 



OCTOBER 28 



19 9 7 



CLASSIFIED AD WRITING TIPS 

^ Utt riMK or Mrvktl firtl. Alwoys put what item 
Of setvKe you ore odverlijmg fiijl Thri tietpi polen 
Itol buytfs (inb whai they ofn iookirvg lor 
Don't MM obbraviafieni. Many buyers are coiv 
(uiod by abbreviation I 
Centidof including riw price Thii lelli buyers il 

tKoy ore looting ot somettimg .n iheif pfice range 



SIlJJ 



BULLETIN BOARD 



ou 



tt CASH FOR COLLEOE 

M GRANTS AI^D SCHOL 
AR SHIPS AVAILABLE 
fnOMSPOt^SOBSIII 
GHEAT OPPOflTUNITV. 
CALL NOW 1<800l533-SS9a 

ttM WOVAL PURFLEI 
KN<all9t« on* tod#v- 

■wf now for onlv 
•34.M. 

ADVANCED FUOHT 

niAINtNO trrjin 7.(100 
houf ATP ii^Ktiuclor Mulli 
•n^rw ATP i through tingle 
•ngin« piivate Hugli Irvin. 
539-3138 

DAVn MOVES kpocml 
ilir^ in camni«rcial and 
rMMwtlial rDovns Vou 
pMk, MNt move We (Mill 
10*4 your truck oi ttailar, 
S39-399e 

no YOU FORGET 
YCHJn im? ROVAL 
PURPLE Kith CO ROM r 
Pied It upTODAV in 
103 KMlii* TTivy can 
*Ult tw purchatvd. 
Mrhila supfHitft Ib«1 lor 
hMt t29 9fi 

DH. LOVES Adult Viilau 
C■s«enr^ Rentals & Sates 
CD ROMS txioli sioie 
tAattlfff novelties And toys. 
12p m 8p "T Monday tKrvj 
Satuiday Mu^i l»! IH tu 
Enter OR. LOVES » EX- 
OTIC DANCERS. INC. A 
Bevi 6ar. teniiilti dctncef* 
n««d«<l Mux tw 21 to en 
ler. Tueftday ttiru Satur 
day Bp.m 12pm. S39 
0190. liltp^Avwvy tan 
UK.net/-drloyetE mail 
dfloves^l^ansas nivr 

EXPEHIEf*CEO WEIGHT 
trainer for tvire Make 
gaint or loie l«|i 100^> 
guarani^e anil rea&unjibJ(.< 
rates. CallWinstQnVan9 
lot appointment. 5e6-902S 

LEARNTO FLY' K State 
Flying Clyb hnd (ivu an 
planet, loweat raiat. For m 
toimation call S39-3733. 

OfO| 

Lost and Found 

Found ads can h» 
plocad fro* for throa 



FOLtMO SLACK, Fre« Spir 
II bika To claim tall 
776-3476. aili lof Stitton 

LOST EYEGLASSES, blue 

wire rtma *n snap cata, 
rtsar aoullt tid* of campui 
537-2234 

0M| 

P»rtl os-ci-Moro 

ADD A oDlrfl loucii ol clati 
to your nail party i Call 
Wayne'iWaiflf Party tor 
portable hot tub ronlalt, 
637-7587. 

ADO A B{)lat^ lo your neml 
bash. Call Wet N Wild Hoi 
Tub'i lor your neiit party a1 
(9131637-1825 



mm 



H0US1NC/NEAL ESTATE 



Manhanan City Ordt- 
nanea 48 14 aaauroa 
•vorv poraon aqual a^ 
portunlTv In houainfl 
without diatinctlon on 
account ot race. aaa. fa- 
mtlial it at u a. military 
itatus. ditabltity. roll- 
Olon. oa*. color, na- 
tional origin a< atKaa- 
Wy. Violation* should 
ba rafmrtad to tha (H- 
roiTtov of Human Ra- 
•ourcat at City HaH, 
SS7-2440 

1H| 

For Ront- 
A|rts. Pumtrntiod 



Clfi3£Ai:tlie 
Uiil75:fitty*' 

• New 

• Fully Furnished 

• 2 & 4 Bedroom 

• Alarm System 

• Swimming Pool 

539-0500 

yNiVERsny 

I ! i ' W! ■ ' 

APARTMENTS 

2?15 COLLEGE AVt 



UNIVEIISITY COM- 
MONS Rofimmatet naod- 
od Sever si two bedroom 
npartmenit needing a sac 
find roommate. Fully fur- 
niihad. many studanl tatv 
icst. individual laaiet 
Plaate call 539 5071 

t10| 

For Ront- 

Apt. 

UnttorolsJi«d 

U9&^S310 ONE BEDROOM 

apatlrrtanti available now 
and Jan. 1. No pots. 687 
0399 

AVAILABLE NOWortK 
ond semester Different 
iiies. some luritiifiad 
Most ulililief paid. Ouiat 
and clean Shortterm 
leate avaitatila 537-8389. 



Y^„ 



ttrtment 
Living At Its Best 
iMTge 2Btdroomi 

~ N 

Sandstone Apti- 
Claml>riitKr Hq. Apia 



Hill 

Investment 
*S^ 'JM 9064 ^ 



\ Bedrooms First 


Month FREE 


Call 


or Jjily 


^IH'LJjf 


• limited 


nmiibcr 


S.^9-2951 



AVAILAeif- NOWi'i Stu 
dto apart mant it wrfhin 
wallting dislarKe to unt 
vartity. Everything alec 
trie, walarMfath p«d 
539-6318 or 537 a22S 

AVAILABLE ONE. twti. 
three, lour t}*d rooms, nica 
apartmenia near campui 
with great pncet First 
moninfree 537 1665 

NOW LEASmO. One to 

Ihrflc tjedfuom at>art 
tnt^irti' huu5irs iit^itr KSU. 
S22SIUS6M Alllano* 
Proporty Managamafft 
B3»~43BT 

STUDIO AFWRTMENT 
Nice one iMdioom, heal 
(latd S295 plus iwslet and 
trash 1019 Houston. 
1 noD 397 2436 then 
erT4 5117 OPfNTODAVt 

THREE FIVE BEDROOMS 
OiM blodt to campus 
Nawly ramodalftd. Mutt 
see to twi level All Iha 
arnenfttes Reasonabia 
ram &3»-«6«1. 



2 Bedrooms for 
the Price uf 1 

limited number let) 
canM9-29SI 



TWO THREE BED 
ROOMS One blodi to cam 
put Very nice with all 
amenities Reasonable 
tent 639-4641 

TWO BEDROOM AND lour 

bedroom apartnierili close 
to campus Rem for 14 
months tlading November 
1 and iHteive (if St month 
and last month rent free. 
Nopals Call 776- 1340 

UNJVtRSfTY TERNACI 

APARTMENTS Loasing 

iui Inll ^n «ii>rnrTirr'r, large 
two and thrae badroofi^ 
apartments with wastiar. 
dryar hookup* f^lol. VSf- 



Housos 



12TH • BLUtMOMt 

Ntce Ttirpe tjedroom 
house. FfISS washer/ dry 
»r. Iront t>adi porcfies Wa 
ter; traiitr [>aid. Otio MoA 
to carripus. S5O0 
S87-8M3 ur |7SS)XS^ 
SSIB, leave mestaga 



A LOT CAN B£ 

SAID ABOUT A 

UrmiBfTOF 

SPACE: 



It works 



Kansas Statk 

(:tn,LH(;i\fN 

532-6555 



AVAILABLE SECOND ae 

nm Ur, Four tiedroom, 
nwo bMh. off aliael park 
ing. large garage Quiat 
and clean, campus doaa, 
pet contidarad, 53T-Sm. 

BRICK IfOME. navy canwt. 
paint, three or tour-bad- 
rooms wtlh two bath- 
rooms. Kitchen appliarwes. 
patio. encloMd yard, cloaa 
to campus. 539- 1177 

FOUR BEDROOM HOUSE. 
915 N 11th tiraet, no pel*, 
Bvailabia first of January. 
S700 539 4277 



MUST SEE Ihit Ihroa bed 

room houae Two bath, 
hill finiahad tiatenriant. 
1525 Call 539 399fl or 
776-4839 tiefore 5pm.. ash 
for Jaton. 

TWO BEDROOM, ONE 

tMth. waahar/ dryar, air 
conditioned Clot* lo cam 
put. Brand n«w. 6400 plut 
utilities 1t29Clanin. 
539-8073 or l7B5«42-«473. 



PorSal*- 
MoMlo Horn— 

14X00 TWO BEDROOM. 

many improvments. newly 
redecorated, new air con 
dilionei. washer/ dryer. 
sited. Close to campus, 
$9600 or bsM offer. 
587-9584 

VERY NICE two- bedroom 
Iwo bath. New living room 
carpet. AD alactric, central 
air Anderson Realty 776- 
4834 or Sharon at 776 7903 

14t| 



tape Irtnacriplon. ipapers 
thesis, dissertation, books, 
resumes, cover letter t1. 30 
plut years expenence 



Reemm«t« 
WwttMl 



S20<V MOHfTH plus one 
fourth utilides; wall! to 
campui. vary clean, water.' 
trash paid, deposit re 
(liiirod. 532-8785, wee 
kends 532-4941 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
rieeded for second semes 
ter Close to campus 
Water and trath paid 
587 9356 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed for apartment next 
temettei, January Juhr 
Mica ertyironrrwm and 
f nandly roommatet. Janu- 
ary rent is tree. 
mlis9213iSilisuedu 
661-9439 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to 

■hare clean, nice two bed 
room apartment Close to 
campuB plus Aggievilla. 
S250 plus one half uiilitiet 
Dnrdre, 537-1793/632 
6061 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
warned lo sublaasa Uni 
veriity Commons Apart 
ment Rent (260/ month 
plus uits lourth utililies 
Available mid - December - 
August Call 776-6981 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted lo share tour bad 
room, rwo bath dupleii, 
one blodi from carr>pus. 
Call 639-8494. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted. Woodway Apart 
ments $205 a month plus 
one- ha It bills, Isate until 
Juna W98« (303)761-1641 

FIRST MONTH and one 

halt free Free KSU park 
ing permit Quiet, very 
nice apartment- Move in 
finals week January. 
639-8977 

NON SMOKING ROOM- 

MATE lor ratponsibia 
male Laundry, cable, t14D 
plut utilities 639-2468 

ROOMMATE WANTED for 
two bedroom house. Non 
smoker $220 per month 
Walai/lrath paid Call 776 
7623 

R(X)MMATE WANTED: Be 
ginning December^ lo 
thare two bedroom, two 
bsth nailer Walnut Grove. 
SIM miles EasI of Manhel 
tan, $180 a rnorith plus one- 
hall utilitiet Water/ trash 
paid Small pets oiiav 
Amar>da or Oabbts 
17861494-2974 

TWO ROOMMATES warn 
ad $20<]V month All bills 
paid 776-4954 

tMl 



AVAILABLE IMMI- 
DIATELY. on»,bMlroom 
tpartmeni $371V momti 
p4u* gat and electric 
Clots to camputi Call 
776-6198 



MMMTSO to take over 
lease $25W month plus 
one third utilitiat Three 
bedrooms af>d two baitkt. 
Closs to campua. Call 
776-9451 

SUBLEASE R NEEDED I 
Room available in four 
bedroom house, vary clot* 
to campus. Washer and 
dryar 1Q15CI«flin. Call 
Jessica. 539-1B28 or 539 
1239 

TRAILOR HOME bedroom 
Female, non amokar. 
January May t2O0a 
month plus ona-ltiird ulili- 
tiss Call Michelle. 
776-0604 




TVPED7 I'll lype papers 
for S1 per double spaced 
page lean atto lypa 
resumtt. ChcxMa one ol 
my styles for $15. I'll create 
your style tor $20 Call 
Wanda at 532-0724 730 
s.m.- 3:30 p m or leave 
voice mail. 

31S| 



Dssktofi 



SEIKO COLORPOINT Dye- 
Sub combo w«> thermal 
color printer New in bok 
Never used $2995 Listi at 
18000 Call 7765999 

MOl 



MuslclOfts/DJs 

FRATERNITIES. SOHORI 
TIES. Student Organiia 
tions, and Clubs Book the 
betl tudio and visual Disc 
Jockey show availafale. 
C&C Energy hat Ifw Mgh 
esl quslity lighting and 
sound on the market to- 
day 30O0 watti of power 
featuring the most current 
music rstaased Competi- 
tive prices call 
I3iei4<l7 1521 Jind leave 
mettaye Uir a pncit cjuola 

1M| 

Automothro 



AUTOGRAFT 2016 Service 
Circle behind WalMart. 
Specializing in Nissan Oaf - 
tun. Honda. Toyota, Sub 
aru. Hyundai and Mards 
537 5049 



OMMr 



COMPREHENSIVE MAJOR 
Medical Covwaga for thoit 
or contlnuout terms lor 
mora inforrrwlion call 
539-6949 

lOSE3T%MONE 

WEKIMT... and 48% more 
fall F^ruvata Has 25 years 
clinical tefting at a major 
US Medical Sdvool Ptov- 
en to lo*ktnaf«wMghii 
taster and kaop it otfi All 
natural, safe Call SSS 839 




M»lp Wsnt»d 



Manhettan Ctty OrA 
narrc* 4814 assures 
every person e4|u«< op- 
IMrtunfty In secwrlng 



ffl#nt Ml arty fiefd of 



Im/ eba is finifwrly qusK- 
n«<> isgaidlatt of raca. 
BOK, mlUtary atatua, die- 
aMIIty. rallgion. age. 
«olor, national origin or 
ancoetry Vlolattone 
altauM be rafionad lo 
the Otreetor el Miiwaw 
R— BUK-sa at City HaM. 
BS7-00S*. 

TIm C oWaB ts n canool 
kit f y itw finaneial po- 
Mntlal of adventae- 
mant* in th* Employ- 
fiioflt/Car**F clAsslfisA- 
tkm. 
vlaed to i 
s«icli amt^loytnent op- 
porti«nlty with ro a een- 
abla caution. The Col- 
logian urge* our rea<l- 
ere lo contact tfi* Sat* 



HslsaL 



639 S«W FOR an typing. 
•diUrtg, proof readlno. 



•01 tC Jefferson. To- 
p*lia. KSSM07-t1BO. 
IS13I2S1-(MS4. 

i210a'HOUROurloptal 
Bsale* rep* make that 
mou(A and nMxat i^aiso 
offer tum ul i , Inside and 
outside poallbns, paid tain 
ing, and opportunity lor 
advsocamani. W* prom 
ote talent from wiltiin the 
organtation Wt are seek 
ir>g five individuals to till 
posilions that have oporwd 
due lo growth Wi have 
fulland part time posltiont 
available Call 19131 
492-7750. aak (or Mr Mil- 
ton 

SI 600 WEEKLY potential 
mailing our ciiculars. No 
ExpeiMnca Required. Free 
information psdiat. Call 
410 783 8272 

$eoO< WEEKLY Sit par 

envelope. Send self ad- 
dressed stamped envel- 
ope GMA. PC Boh 11486. 
Atlanla, Georgia 30324 E 
mailGENMAR 
KET9aol.com 

AOMmiSTIMTIVi AS- 
SISTANT: Ailininistratlv* 
assistant needed lor fast 
paced conatruction office 
In the Manhattan/ F i Riley 
■rat MMtIng December 
ItSI. MuM be able to 
Mrark independently and 



wall with ottteit General 
duties include: Typing cor- 
retpondanca. reports, con 
Iracli, etc , Pavroll, Invoic 
es. Maintaining cftedt 
t>ook, certified payroll, an 
swering phones, filing and 
purchauiig suppliet for ttie 
ofTice. Enperlsnca in Mi 
crosoflWindows96. Lotus 
123 and ASSOOs plus Sal 
sry commensurate with ex 
peiience F>leate send re 
tume to MA, Morlenton, 
PO Bui 1546, ColumtHs. 
MO 65205. Ann Dale Hat 
er. 

ARRANGE YOUR Spring 
acmetler |Ob now. Kaw 
Valley Greenhouse, Inc is 
interviewing now to start 
in December. January or 
February Enioyable work 
atmoiphera, competitive 
pay and opportunity. Call 
776 8586 tietween 3.00 and 
4 30p m 

BASE PIUS COM MIS 
SION First year earnings 
can eiiceed $46,000 First 
momh earnings can 
exceed $4000' We are for- 
tune 500 company grow 
ing locslhr m lensaa We 
are seeking talented indi 
viduals to fill potilionl in 
our tales depart inAnI We 
oHai SI9.OO0 S22.000 
tkoaa, weekly commissions. 
no trsvel. full benafils op 
portuniry for advance- 
ment! If you are inleresod 
ift more iolormation or 
would like a phone imer- 
view, please call 1913) 
492-87B0 and ask lor Ken 
ny 

CANIMCTAUCrWama 

pert -time lobihat pays full 
time 7 Want a guaranteed 
hourly wage, plus twnus 
at'Then can m«l M- F 
Ip.m- 9f>.m , 587-4114 atk 
tor Sharon 

COMPUTER ItdFORMA 
TION Specialist 1*3041, Parl- 
or Full lime, temporary po 
sifion, not to exceed 12 
months, in tha Department 
of Agronomy S.S degree 
In computer science plus 
SIX months eiiperienca with 
C**, Visual Baaic. and 
Windows 3,1/95 Know! 
edge ol (or age mantge 
meni and/ or cow-calf pro 
duction systems helpful 
but nol required Send let 
ler of application, resume, 
transcnpta. and ansnge for 
three letlera of reference to 
be sent to: Oi. Gerry L 
Postal. Head, Depanrrteni 
ot Agronorny. Throditmor- 
ton Plant Sciences Cantsr, 
Kintai State Univorsilv, 
Menhanan, KS 66506-5501 
Application deadlifte: Oc 
lobar 29. 199T Kansas 
State University is an AF 
fitmative Action/ equal op 
portunity employer KSU 
encourages diversity 
an^onQ its employees 

MULTI-MCDIA SniD- 
ElfT ASSISTANT. Pro 
duce websites, videos and 
oltter multi-media. Need 
relsvani computer ex peri 
ence; prefer communica 
lionsrelsted ma|Or. 10 20 
hour^weak Apply 148 Wa 
tars Hall 

nkfrr TIME work tor cot 

lags students. Make your 
own schedule- Earn up lo 
(90 (200/ per week Prow 
en resume builder for all 
maiurs Scholar ships, in 
terships. co-ops available 
Cor>ditior>s apply Work in 
Manhattan Interview at 
peiturinel offiDe inTopeka 
Cell (785)226 1144 M F, 
12 4pm 

RAOULS eSCONOfOO'S 
Now accepting applicationt 
for tervart and cookt 
Apply Monday Friday bat 
ween 2p m. 4pm. 215 
Selh Child Road. 

THOROUGH HOUSE clean 
ing lot couple with no pett, 
smoktng. children. Flexible 
schedule Ad|acant to cam 
pus Respond with letter 
and qualificstiont to Col- 
legian t>OK 1 

WAtifTED SANTA Clause. 
Mature people needed for 
professional Sartta Claute 
assignment Good with 
children and able to work 
four and one halt hours, 
day and evening thift 
weekdays o\ weekends: 
November 22 Dacamber 
24 Expetierica helpful, but 
natural Santa personatity 
most impotani Call Re 
nactiont Photography st 
539 1550 

WANTED: SANTA'S help 
ers Must be good with 
diildren IMekday and we 



kend shifts available. Mutt 
be available fJovembat 22 
December 24 Call Rallec 
tiona f^otography at 
539 1550. 



Buslfwss 
OpportMnltl»s 

Ttte ColloDlan cannM 
worlfy ttte ftnanclal po- 
tentlel of edvertlae- 
rvbeots In tha Employ- 
ment/Career claaelf lea- 
tlon. Reeders ere ad- 
ylaad lo approadi any 
audi bueir>ese opptK- 
tunlty wHh raetonable 
cauiliwi.Tlia CoHeglan 
ur^ea our reaikars to 
contact llie Better Susl- 
nesa Bureau, 601 SE 
Jeffereon^Topelra, KS 
BSS07-11SO. 
IS13I232^04»4 

DESIGN AND coordinate 
advertising lor national me 
die. monthly mailings, dai 
ly stsignments. loi ag 
gretaive mail order com- 
pany Pay It commensurate 
With ability Send resume 
to Golden Sea Graphics, 
PO Box 30. Green leal. KS 
66943 

EARN MONEY and FREE 
TRIPS 1 1 /kbaolute Bett 
SPRING BREAK Packages 

available I < INDIVIDUALS. 
Student ORGANIZATIONS. 
Of small GROUPS warn 
edit Call INTER CAMPUS 
PROGRAMS at 1800 
327-6013 or 
hltp7/wwiw.cipl com 




410 



Itews for S»l« 

ISaS ROYAL PURPLE I 
Purcliase ofw today. 
Stop by 103 Kedile. 
Suy now for only 
S24.SS. 

ANTIQUES. COLLECTI 
BLES, tools, books, lurni 
ture, eitate lewslry. beer 
signs, thousands of cun 
ous goods. Time Machine 
Antique Maul and Flea 
Madtet 4910 Skyway Dr 
between Bnggs and air- 
port 539 4684 

CABLE DESCRAUBLEft kit 
$14 95. See all the piemi 
um and pay per view chan- 
nel* (8001752 1 389- 

COOK BOOKS. Vintage 1 1 
cansa tags, ancyclopedta't, 
black memorabilia, church 
windows, oriental fur nituf 
and potary. Viniagv mags 
zines. txioki. religLious. 
hats, radios, clocks, auto, 
tools, cameras, albums, (uf 
nilura. poiery, ettats |ew 
etry, American heritage 
traoks. movis stills, tavern 
ilult. bras*, trunks, mill 
tary, tins, stems. 50's furni 
ture. flule, prints, noor 
lamps, new car trailer 
(1499, new 5x 9 tilt trailier 
$699, 8000 Square feel n( 
cunoua goodt. Time Ma 
chine Antique and Flea 
Market 4910 Skyway Dr 
between airport and 
Briggt. Visa, MasterCard, 
layawsy 539 4684 open 
1200pm 5 00pmTuei 
day thru Saiurdsv 

K-STATE PUimE or 

aou) oLrmii 100 

pound lifiims, (76/ drum, 
you haul samples 786 
043 1605, lorcade@com 
pusefve.com, 

SELLING ALL my oil pami 
ing stulf- Some new, aoma 
used Call TTB-IMB. 

SONY PLAYSTATION, con 
trola. memory card, three 
gamea. tlOO. call Rod 
776-7482 

WATERBEDMATRESS 
King-siie with wave reduc 
Hon. Cost 1300 will tell 
(176 1SOO.mTI43e th«> 
874611T, 



WWW, SUPERIOR A 
CURACOMVIEWouf en 
tire line of new AND pre 
owned Acuia't Ask for Pa 
tridi J Sleinet #1 rated 
Aeura web Site in Itie na- 
tionl 



Collegian 
Classifieds 
will REEL 
in your 
custorners 



/ 




AS State 

LE(;iAIN 
2-6555 



V 



Fiimitur* to 
Biiy/»«ll 



JERRTY'S 1NHOLESALC 
CARPCT Carpel r^mnanls 
and vinyl remnants 604 
Yuma Monday- Friday, 
8:308 m - $:30p m Sal 
Sa m - t2p.m Open to the 
public. 



MONITOR REPAIR, quick 
and reliable service Free 
pick up and delivery. Call 
tniand 776 0311 

f>ACKAPD BELL Pentium 
120MHZ leMBRAM. 2a« 
modem, 4XCD 16 IrMh 
monitor, tBOO, call Kelby 
twtween 7p.m.-K)p,m,, 
565-0281 



480| 

Pets and 
Suppllos 



BAev UMORELIAS. Blue 
and yuid Macaws. Hahnns 
Macaws, sweet, fun. cuddly 
rare Love Birds. Cockatiles, 
539 1177 



lA' 



pet 




fur sale .' 
Advertise 

in the 
C'lassifieils. ^^ 

Kdiisii!! Sliitt.' ( 'ollc^iaii 
.1.12-6555 



•fMirtIng 
1 gulp milt 



GOVERNMENT SUR 
PLUSH Camouflage clolh 
ing, boots, rainwesf, wikiI 
clothing Also CAflHARTT 
WORKWEAR Monday 
Friday 9am 6 30prii Sat 
urdey9e.ni. 5p in SI 
Marys Surplui Sales, St 



Marys, Kansas. 17851437 
2734 



Stor«o 
Equlpnwnt 

ALPINE CD chanqef model 
5970 Like new 539 4058. 



Tlekoto to 
B4iy/S»H 



SELLING FOUR KSU KU 
football tiiAeis Taking 
tjest offer try Oclobar 3 1 
Call 1316)492-1521 and 
leiive mastaqe witli an ull 
er Seats are located in ttie 
nnrth end :one. gnneral ad 
miminn 

TICKETS WANTED KSU- 
Colora<to (onibal) yan m 
Sli>denl section or other 
Will buy onf* or Iwo Giill 
collna 1786)331 2031 
lOn m Hp in or <7a6ie41 
53Vt9oin lOa-m 

WANTED K STATE vs 
Coliirado lidialt Will buy 
any numb«i ot lickels Call 
collwl 1913) B29 7350. ask 
fur Mary. 



PST-J 




)(o 



TRANSPORTATION 



siol 



AutomobHss 

1979 FORD LTD station 
wagon. 537-2822 alter 

5pm Use lor hunting, 
(rshing and tailgatii pirnirrs 

1986 MUSTANG GT ton 
veniblo customized Too 
many new parts to list 
Must >eei $5500 or best 
offer SB7 9271- 

PAWT IT PUHPU ix'r 
(act for lailgaln. all equipail 
1979Winnpl>fl(jo rnolor 
hofoe- gond conrtition 73K- 
maiHinalili!. S3S-47S3 



Motofcyclos 

19««9 NINJA €O0R Jotled. 
custiim (>i|H-«, b(a,eHlta« 
Runs grodi. (1660 or tii,M 
offer. 639 8925 

1994 KAWASAKI Ninia 
250 Black, putpla. 
665 0242 

FOR SALE Yamaha 1992 
Seca, red, sharp. $2999 or 
tiesi offni 53<) 0793 




Spring 
Br«sk 



SPRmO BREAK SS- Ma 

kalian Willi CtJiiif^ti Tours 
Airfuie. seven iiighls hotnl. 
transfers, pnrtws For 
bfochuieor eariiiiiy FNCE 
trip 1 eoO 395 489<) 
rwww I ollwtjutoijf s con\\ 

SPIUHO BREAK BB' Fioo 

tcmd and diiTihsi i '.ukruii 
Bahamas. J^'mi.ti. .i ii,,i 
Florida (roni S3yy Uiijiin 
tr« a small qroup nnil hnv 
el tree I Hiyhnst toiiiiiii>i 
sions jitid kiwiTSI (irlLDml 
Call Sort & Sun Truif s to 
beromn a cairipus ropri* 
tentative IROOA 74 7577 

"SPRING BREAK -talB 

2'" Hkiihj Hij|i«i Sell 15 
Take 2 Free Hciltml D»s1i 
iiatton^t Ffi'B PttMipt (aK 
anilDimli^ Sui>S(ii,if>n > 
HOO 4J(i /JH) 



WE KICK ADSI 
WE KICK ADSI 
WE KICK ADSI 




ITX^h^ WtictKtT you're tiiiyiiiii or srllliiK (hi> 

[Ijlf fall, Itif t'dlk-iiUin iliifthltltiK li.nt 

wild I ytiu need! Our dciih itrr (I'.itiircil 

(tully litr ilif 20,(iOU %iii(|{'iiIh .iikI 

5,0(X> lai'iiitv iii'roh> i';iiit|iti>t 

Kansas State Ct II, I. H(;i AN 

103 Kedsle 532-e9B5 




CbssilietJ RATES 
1 DAY 

20 wordi or loss 

17 15 

MxK word over 20 

1 20 p«f word 

3 DAYS 

20 wofdt Of leii 

SB 40 

eoch word ov»r 20 

$.25 per word 

3 DAYS 

20 words Of leii 

1945 

Mch word over 20 

$.30 pet word 

4 DAYS 

20 woidi or lojs 

$1020 

«och word over 20 

$.35 per wafd 

5 DAYS 

20 wordi or loti 

$1070 

eoch word over 20 

$ 40 per word 

I coriiKuiive day role | 



HOW TO PAY 

All claisiliedi mutt bt 

paid m odvonce unleii 

you tiove on oceounl 

With Sfudeni 

Pubiitotionj Inc 

CoiK, check 

MoslerCard ot Viso are 

otcepted There iv o 

$10 lervice charge on 

oil returned choclii 

W» resefye the rtghl lo 

edit, reject or prapetiy 

classify ony od 



FREE FOUND ADS 

Ai i(fivii.e (u you we 

run lound odi lor itiree 

dayi tree of chorge 



COIRECnONS 

Il ycu lind ail en or ifv 

*^^ od, pUoK'-oBi.* 

We occ^l re^n&ibJi ' 

ly only for the hrtl 

wrong imertion. 



CANCEUATIONS 

II you mII your ilem 

before your ad lias 

eipired, iive will rehind 

you lor )I)B refnainiftg 

doy> You mull coll us 

belofe hoon (he day 

before the od ii lo be 

publisfied 



HEADUNES 

f 01 an tt.Ua cti<j(^e, 

we II put o lieodime 

obov* yotir jd lo ':0>ch 

ihe reodei's ^it1enttor^ 




200 



■■nVICIOIf^lCTORY 



■ MPt-OTMENT.'CAflSERS 



OPRM MARKCT 



TRANftPORTATiaN 




TMAVCLrrmPX 



TO PUCE AN AO 

GoioKediie 103 
(octou from itit K-Staie 
ShtdenMMienl Offitre 

houri ore Mondoy 
through Finjoy htm 6 

am toS ptti The 

ofHci il open eacepi 

on holidoyk 



DEADLINES 

ClauiW odi rnuii be ploced 

bf noon lh« doy bt^re th« 

dole you wont you* ad to run 

CloisiFiod ditploy odi mutt be 

ploctd by i p. in two woiking 

(ioyi prior to ihe dale you 

«ranl your od to run 






r\^ 



CSUtSTONM 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




TUESDAT, OCTOBEK 28, 1997 



CLASSIFIED AD WRITING TIPS 

^ Lift itamt or Mnri»i fint, Alwoys put what <iem 
or service you ore odverlising flrsf This helps poten 
liol buyers firvd whgr ihey are lookirvg for 
Oen't UM obbrvviotiont. Many buy«rj art con 
lussd by abbrevialior>s 

CemidM' including th* prk* This iell» buyers il 
Inty are looking at lomerhmg m their price range 



t 

I 



SliJI 



BULLETIN BOARD 




M CASH FOU COLLCOE 

M GRANTS AUD SCHOL 
AftSHIPS AVAILABLE 
FROMSPONSORSMI 
GREAT OPPORrUNITV 
CALL NOW 1«MlO)S32-8asa 

IMS HOVAL PURPLEI 
Purdia** onm today. 
Stop bv 103 K«l)l«. 
■uy now tor only 
t24.M. 

ADVANCED FUOHT 
niAiNMO lf<jm T.QOO 
hoiit ATP instructor MutTi- 
engirw ATP ttitough single 
•nuina private HuQh Irvm. 

DAVIS MOVES special 
illnfl in commercial and 
retidflntial movas. Vou 
padt. wfl move We w*tl 
hMd your Irudi or trailer, 
539-3996 

NO YOU FORGET 
VOUR 1»»7 nOVAL 
PURM-E with CO ROM 7 
Ptch It upTODAV in 
103 Kadiia. Thay can 
MHI ba purdtaaad, 
whila *uppli«« lait for 
tuvt US as 

Om. LOVES Adult Villi!! u 
Casaalta Ranrati i!t Sat&s 
CO ROMS, bonli store. 
leather novelties and toys. 
12p.m. tip m Manday ttiru 
Saturday Miiki tm 18 10 
Enter DA. LOVES k EX- 
OTIC DANCERS. INC. A 
Baar Bar. leiiiale dnncD^s 
nMded Muitba21taen 
Mr. Tuesday thru Salur 
day Sp.m. 12pm. S39 
0190, hnp;//www.lian 
MS neV-drlovet E mail 
drlovea^li ansas nm 

EXPERIENCEOWEIGHT 
trainer lor hire Make 
gams or lose fall 100^ q 
guarantee and reasonable 
rates CollWioitonyBng 
tor appointnwnt SS%-M;5 

LEARNTOFIVIK State 

Flying Club has five atr- 
ptanes, lowest rates. For in 
lormation call S39 3733 



Lost mnd Found 

Found ad* can be 
placed fraa for ItHae 



FOUND BLACK, Free Spir 

It bllte. To ctairn calt 
776-3476, ask tor Britlon 

LOST EYEGLASSES, blue 
wire rrmi in snap caaa, 
near loutti aide ol i:ampus- 
537-2234 

0«0| 

ParMos-n-lllero 

ADO A entra toudt o( dais 
to your next partyi Calt 
Wayne's Water Party for 
portable hot tub rentals 
537-7587 

AOO A splash to your next 
baah Call Wet -N Wild Hot 
Tub'e for your nent party al 
19131537-183*. 




fWanbattan City Ordi- 
nafw* AS 14 aaaurva 
•vary parson a4|ual 0|^ 
pwlunlty In howairtg 
wttbout distinction on 
account of race, sea, fa- 
milial statu (, military 
atatus. disability, ralt- 
gton, *tfa. color, na- 
Monal origin or encaa- 
try. Violation* sliauld 
ba ivportad to iha Dt- 
ractor of Human Re- 
MMirca* at City HoH, 
U7-2440. 

106| 

For Ront- 
Jtpts. Fumlslfd 



Uxilysi'stty*' 

• New 

• Fully Furnished 

• 2& 4 Bedroom 

• Alarm System 

• Swimming Pool 

Mffitf L9a«ifig 



530-0500 



NIVERSITV 



: I 



w 



APARTMENTS 

J215 COtlEGf AVE 



UMVERSFTY COM- 
MONS R{>on^ mates need 
cd Several two bedroom 
spadmenis needing 1 sac 
ond roon^mais. Fully fur- 
nished, many student terv 
■COS, individual leases 
Please call 539- 6071 

110| 

For Ront- 

Apt. 

UnfurwlBhod 

1296 t310 ONE BEDROOM 
at>artments available now 
and Jan 1 No pets 5BT 
0399. 

AVAILABLE NOW or tac 
ond semeilof. Different 
sits*, some lurnitfied 
Moat utilities paid. Quiet 
and clean. Short term 
lease available &37-B389. 



Apartment 

Living At Its Best 

l^rge 2- Bedrooms 
^ 

Sandftonc Apti. 
C!amhriiJf(r Sq. Apit 



Hill 

Investment 

^ Si? 9064 ^ 



MUST SEE this three-bed- 
room house Two balti. 
full finished basement. 
$G2S Call S39 3998 or 
776-4839 twlore 5pm. ask 
tor. 



1 Bedrooms First 
Month FREE 

(. ,ill hit (i.iily 

<ijicii.ll • ImiitrJ 

nunilH-r 539-2951 



AVAILABLE NOWm Stu 
dio apannwnt is wittiin 
walkirtg dislartce to unt- 
versity. Evervthing elec- 
tric, water/ trash paid. 
539-6318 urS37 8?7e. 

AVAILABLE ONE. two, 
three, four bedrooms, nice 
Bpsdments near campus 
with great puces First 
month free 537 t$ee 

NOW LEASmO. One to 

tt>ree bedroom aped 
month' houses neet KSU, 
t22S 10 teSO AIHmmo 
Pr oparfy Managamant 
S3S-43S7. 

STUDIO AfARTMENT 
Nice ona-bedroom, heat 
paid. $295 plus water artd 
trash 1019 Houston 
1 BOO 397-7430- than 
Br4 5TI7 OPENTODAVt 

THREE FIVE aEDftOOMS 
One t)liM± to campus. 
Newly retnodeletl Must 
see to believe I AH Ihe 
amenities. Reasonable 
teni 639-464) 



2 Bedrooms for 
the Price of 1 

limited number left 
call 539-2951 



TWO THREE BED 
ROOMS One blodi lo cam 

pui \tery nice with all 
amenities Reasonable 
rent 539-464 1 

TWO BEDROOM AhtO four 
bedroom npartinems close 
lo campus Rem lot 14 
months slarting November 
1 and receive first month 
and last inonth rent Ire* 
Nopets Call 776-1340 

UNIVERSrTV TERRACE 

APARTMENTS Leasing 
lor fall or SLimmsr, large 
two and three tredroorn 
apartments avith wssftai. 
dryer hookups. POot S3T- 



For ftont- 

HOM— s 

12TH a BLUCMONl 

Nice three bedroom 
huuia FREE washer/ dry 
er. front' tiad porcfies We 
t«r, travh paid Ona bloeti 
to campua. t500 
M7-aS03 or |7aS)2ft3- 
3S1B, leave massag* 



A LOT CAN BE 

SAJDABOUTA 

LITTLE BTT OF 

SPACE: 



It works 



Kansas Statk 
532-6555 



AVAILABLE SfCONO *• 
mester. Four'bedrooft), 
two bath, oil street parte 
ing. large garage Ouial 
and clean, carnpus cloea, 
pel oonsidSfMi. S3T-S38B 

BRICK HOM£, new carpM, 

paint, tfirae or four-bMh 
rooms with v*m bath- 
room* Kitchen sppliarkcas, 
patio. eiM^losad yatd. closs 
to (;ampus. 539- 1177 

FOUR BEDROOM HOUSE. 
915 N 11th etreal, no pals, 
available first of January, 
1700. 5394277 



TWO BEDROOM, ONE 
bath, washer/ dryer, air- 
condrtkmsd Close to cam 
pua. Srsnd new t400 plus 
ulilitie* linClaflin 
539-8073 or 17951842-8473 

1H| 

For Salo- 
IWobllo Mom— 

14)(S0TWO BEDRtXIM, 

many improvments, newly 
redecorated, new air con- 
ditioner, wssher/ dryer. 
•had. Close lo campus, 
tSSOO or best off sf , 
5B7-95&4 

VERY NICE two-bedroom 
two bath. New tivrng room 
carpet. All alactric, central 
air Anderson Realty 776- 
4834 or Sharon at 776 7903 



noommato 



1200' MONTH plus ona- 
lourTh utilities, walk to 
campus; very clean; water/ 
trash paid; deposit re 
quired; 532-8785; wee 
kendsS32-4»41 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed lor second semes 
tar. Close to campus. 
Wster and trash paid 
587 S356. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed loi apartment next 
semester, January July. 
Nice environment end 
friendly roommates Janu- 
ary rent is Irea 
nili^213^*u.edu 
565-9439. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to 

share cisen, nice two bed 
room aiiartment. Close to 
campus plus Aggieville. 
S250 plus one halt utilities 
Oeirdrs,537-1793r532 
6061. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted to sub4easa Uni 
varsity Commons Apart 
mem. Rent 1750^ month 
plus one fourth utilities. 
Available mid Decembei 
Augusl Call 776 6981 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share lour bed 
room, two bath duplex . 
one block from campiM. 
Call 539-8494 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted. Woodway Apart 
meni*. tI65 a month plus 
one-hall brils. lease until 
June 1998< 13031751-1641. 

FIRST MONTH and one 
half tree Free KSU park 
ing permit. Quiet, very 
nice apartment. Move in 
finals week January. 
539-8977 

NON SMOKING ROOM 

MATE for responsible 
male Laundry, cable, $140 
plus utilities 539-2468 

ROOMMATE WANTED for 
two tiedroom house Non 
smoker $220 per month 
WsterArash paid Call 776. 
7823. 

ROOMMATE WANTED Be 
ginning OecemlMr. lo 
share two tiedroom. two 
bath trailer Walnut Grova. 
siK miles East of Manhat 
tan, $180 a month plus one 
hall utilities Watar/ tresh 
paid Small pats okav, 
Amanda or Debbie 
1785)494- 2974, 

TWO ROOMMATES want 
ad $200/ month All bills 
paid 71«-49S4 

IMl 



AVAILABLE IMME 
OIATILY, one tMdroom 
apartmarft $370 riMintb 
plus gas and alaclrle. 
OoM to campual Call 
776-6135 



I to take over 
lease. $25^ month plus 
one third utilities Three 
bedroom* and two btHtts 
Close lo campua. CaH 
776-9451 

SUBLEASER NEEOEDI 

Room available in lour- 
badroom house, very close 
lo cempus Waehar artd 
dryer 1015 Ctallin Call 
Jessica. 539- 1828 or 539 
1239 

TRAILOR HOME bedroom 

Female, non. smoker 
January May $200 a 
ntonth plus on* third utili 
tie* Call Micbaila, 
776-0504 




flosumo/ 



tape transcriplon. Ipapers. 
thesis, disss nation, books, 
resumes, coverlettersl. 30 
plus year* superience 

NEED SOM C niW O 
TYPE07 III type paper* 
foi $1 per double spaced 
pega. I can also type 
resumes. Choose one of 
my styles lor $15 I'll create 
your style for S20 Call 
Wanda at 532^724 7:30 
am - 3:30 p m. or leave 
voice r 



Sill 

Oooktop 
PuMlsiiIng 



SEIKO COL OR POINT Dya- 
Sub combo wen thermal 
color printer. New in bok. 
I4ever used. $2995. Lists at 
$8000. Call 776-5999 



FRATERNITIES, SORORI 
TIES. Student Organijs 
lions, and Clubs Book the 
best audio and visual Disc 
Jodiey show avsitabi* 
CiC Energy has ttte high- 
esl quality lighting and 
sound on the market to- 
day 3000 wstts of power 
featuring the most current 
music released Compeli 
live prices call 
1316)492-1521 and leave 
message lor a price quote 

iM| 

AutofnoUv* 
itopjilr 

AUTOCRAFT 201 B Sen^ica 
Circle behind WalMart. 
SpecislKing in Nissan Dai 
sun. Honda, Toyota, Sub 
aru, Ktyundai end Merda 
537 5049 



Othor 



COMPREHENSIVE MAJOR 
Medical Coverage lor short 

or continuous term* for 
more information call 
539-8949 

LOSE 37S MOM 

INCIOHr... and 48% mora 
let' Pyruvate has 25 years 
(Hinical teMing *( a major 
US Medical School Prov 
en 10 lose rtiottf wefgbi 
taster and keep it ofTI All 
natural, safe Call BBS 839- 




Molp Wantod 



Manliettan CKy Ordi- 
niar»ca 4914 assures 
evarv person equal op- 
portuirlty In sacurir>§ 
aitd holding arnploy- 
m anl In arty field of 
nvOfflt Of latoar for vi^lalt 
•>•/ alio la ptoposly tiyall- 
riod tsBarJ iM a of raco, 
sai, rrdRtary status, dka- 
abiltry, religion, age, 
color, national origin or 
aneaetry. Violations 
should bo refMrted to 
tite Olrootor of Hu m a n 
R oao me a a at City Hall. 
f37-0Oi« 

The Coltaglan i»nnot 
worMy ttn financial po- 
tential of edwtiae- 
moiits in the Errtfyloy- 
ntant^arear clasalflc^ 
tlon. Raeders mt* ed- 
Vlsad to appraadl any 
such ampioymant o^ 
portunHy wfth roaeort- 
aMo caution. Ttta Col- 
Isglan urgae our taad- 
•r* to eontaot the Sot- 



SOI SSJ«MWrwHi,To- 
|»ek«, KS SM0T-11S0. 

I*13)331-04S4. 

$21.00' HOUR Our top let 
ssales reps make that 
mouch and morel 1A^ also 
offer beneltts. inside and 
outside positions, paid tain, 
ing, and opponunity lot 
advarKamanl. We prom 
Ota talent from within the 
organtetion W* are ssak 
ing five individuals to till 
positions that have opened 
due to growth Wa have 
fuiland pan lime posltiona 
available Call 1913) 
492-7TS0. askforMr Mil- 
ton 

S1500 WEEKLY potsnhsl 
mailing our circulars No 
Experwnce Required Fraa 
information padial. Calf 
410 7S3 8272 

SeOO. WEEKLY $Uper 
envelope Send sell sd- 
dressed stamped envel. 
ope GMA PO Box 13488, 
Attenia. Georgia 30324. E 
mailGENMAR 
KE T®*ol com 

ADMIMSTHATIVB AS- 
SISTANTS AdiiiiniBtialiva 
aaaWMnl needed for fail 



well with oihei* General 
duties mclucie; Typing cor- 
respondence, reports, con- 
tracts, etc., Payrolf, Invoic- 
es, Maintaining cherii 
book, certified payroll, an 
swaring phones. III ing and 
purchasing supplies lor the 
office Experience in Mi 
crosofl Wtndows95, Lotus 
123 and AS400 a plus Sal 
ary commensurate with ex- 
penence Please sand re- 
sume to MA Morlenson, 
PO Box 1546, ColumbiB, 
MO 65205, Attn : Dale Het 
er, 

ARRANGE VOUR Spring 
semester job now. Kaw 
Valley Greenhouse, Inc i* 
jntsrviawing now to start 
In December, January or 
February Enjoyable work 
atmoiphere, competitive 
pay and opportunity Call 
776-8585 between 300 and 
4:30pm. 

BASEPLUSCOMMIS 
SION. First year earninge 
can aacoad $45,000 First 
month earnings can 
exceed $40001 Vta are for 
tune 500 compeny grow 
ing locally in Leneaa We 
are seeking talented indi- 
viduals to till IKlSltlOnS in 
our salex department We 
offer: S19.000 S22.0O0 
tMsa, weekly commissions, 
no travel, full belief lis. op- 
portunity lor advance 
menti II you are interesed 
in more mfoimation or 
would like a phorie inier 
view, please call (913) 
492-B780 and ask lor Ken- 
ny. 



ETAUCT Want a 

part time |0b that pays full 
lime7Wsnl a guaranteed 
hourly wage, plus bonus 
es7Thsn csll mel M- F 
lpm-9pm. 587 4114 ask 
for Sharon 

COMPUTER INFORMA 
TION Specialist 1*304), Pad- 
or Full time, temporary po 
silion. not to exceed 12 
months. In the I>epartment 
ol Agroiiomy B.S degree 
In comptjter science plus 
six monltis experience with 
C»*. Visual Basic, and 
Windows 3.1/95. Know I 
edge of forage rnanegs 
menI arid/ or cow-calf pro 
dudion systems helpful 
but not requiied Send let 
tsi ol applicalion, resume, 
transcripts, and anange for 
three letters of relerance to 
be sent to; Or Gerry L. 
Poster Head, Oepartment 
of Agronomy. Throdonor 
ton Plant Scierices Center, 
Kenea* State Unlvsfsity, 
Manhattan, KS 66506-5501. 
Application deadline; Oc 
lobar 29. 1997 Kansas 
Slate University is an Af 
firmative ActiorV equal op 
portunity employer, KSU 
encou'sgei diversKy 
among its employee*. 

MULTI-MEDIA STUD- 
ENT ASSMTANT, Pro 

duce websites, videos and 
other mullimediB Need 
relevant computet expeti 
ence; prefer communica 
lions-ratated major 10 20 
hours/ week. Apply 148 We 
ters Hall 

PART TIME WORK lor col 
lege students. Make your 
own schedule Earn up to 
S50- S200/ per week Prov- 
en resume builder for all 
ma|ors Sdiolar ships, in- 
ter ships. CO ops available. 
Conditions apply. Work in 
Manhattan, interview at 
personnel office inTopaka. 
CalM78SI228-1144 M F, 
12 4pm 

RAOULS ESCONOIOO'S 
Now accepting applicationi 
for servers and cooks. 
Apply Monday Friday bet 
ween 3pm 4pm 216 
Seth Child Road 

THOROUGH HOUSE clean 
ing for couple with no pets, 
smoking, children Flexible 
Bcheduls Adjacent lo cam 
pus Respond with keOer 
and quelifications to Col- 
tsgian box 1 

WAffTED: SANTA Clause 
Mature peofile needed for 
profeeeionai Santa Clause 
asa^grwnent. Good with 
children ar>d able lo work 
tout and orie halt hours, 
day and evening shift 
weekdays or weekends: 
November 22 December 
24. Expariaiice helpful, but 
natural Santa tiersonatity 
most important Call Re 
tladions f^otogrsphy at 
53»-1S60. 

WANTED: SANTA'S help- 
ers Must be good with 
children Weekdey end we 



kend shifts available, 
be available November 22- 
December24 Call I 
lions Photography al 
539-1650 

3M| 

BMslnoss 
OpportunWos 

The Collegian r^noot 
e a r I f y the flnaiicial po- 
terttlal af advertlea- 



n»anVCare*r claaalflce- 
tlon. Raadars are afl- 
vlaed to approach any 
ai»^ buslrtess oppor- 
tunity wHh roasottabla 
«»u1lon.Tha CoMeglen 
tirgea our readers to 
OOfltact the Setter Sual- 
fiaea Bureau, K>1 SE 
Jaffareon, Topoka, KS 
S4S07-11BO. 
tS13l232-04»*, 

D€SIGN AND coordinate 

advertising for national me 
die, monthly mailings, dai 
ly assignments, for ag 
gressive mail order com 
peny Pay is commensurate 
with ability Send resume 
to Golden Sea Graphics, 
FH3 Box 36. Greenteaf. KS 
669*3 

EARN MONEY end FREE 
TRIPS 1 1 AbsoluleBest 
SPRING BREAK Packages 
avsilnblel' INDIVIOUALS. 
Student ORGANIZATIONS, 
or small GROUPS want 
edii Call I fJTER CAMPUS 
PROGRAMS at 1«)0 
327-6013 or 
http/Zwww.cipt com 




Itotns for <»lo 

t0MI ROYAL PURPLE I 
Purchase one today. 
Stop by 103 Kadi la. 
Suy riow for only 

t24.as. 

ANTIQUES, COLLECTI 
BLE5. tools, bcHiks, furni 
ture. estate jewelry, beer 
sign*, thousends of curt 
ous goods Time Mach ine 
Antique Maul and Flea 
Madiet 4910 Skyway Dr 
between Bnggs srtd sit 
port 539-4684 

CABLE OeSCRAMBLER kiL 
$1* 95. See all Ihe prerrti- 
um and pey per view chan 
nets 1800)752-1389 

COOK BOOKS, Vinlage li 
cense lags, encyclopedia's, 
bledi mernorabilia. churcii 
windows, oriental lurnitur 
and potery. Vintage mage 
line*, book*, religuou*, 
hats, radios, clocks, auio. 
tools, cameras, albums, fur 
nilure, potery. estate jew 
eiry, Arrierican heritage 
books, movie stilts, tavern 
stuff, brss*. trunks, mih 
lary, tins, slain*. 50's furni 
lure, flute, prints, floor 
lamps, new car trailer 
$1498, new 5i 9 tttt trailler 
$599. 8000 Square leet of 
curious good* Time Ms 
chine Antique and Flea 
Market 4910 Skyway Dr 
between airport and 
Brrggs. Visa, MaatarCard. 
layeway 539- 4684 open 
12 OOp m 5:00p m Tuas 
day thru Saturday 

K-STATE PURPLE or 
OOlOaUTTEII too 

pour>d duims. S7!b' drum, 
you haul samptes 7B5 
8*3 1605, torcade#com 
pusene.corn 

SELLINGALlfnyoilpaint 
ing sluH Some new. some 
used Call 7765999 

SONY PLAYSTATION, con 
trols. memory card, three 
games $200. call Rod 
776-7482 

WATERBEDMATRESS 
King. sire with wave reduc 
tion Cost $360 will sell 
$175 1 8003972436 than 
874 5117 



WWW.SUPERIORA 
CUR A COM VIEW our en 
tire line ol new AND pre 
owned Acura's Ask for Pa 
trick J Sterner *1 rated 
Acura web sile in ifie na 
tioni 



Collegian 
Classifieds 
will REEL 
in your 
customers 

/ 

fAS Statk 
.LK<;iAIS 



r 



\ 



419| 

Fumltur* to 
Buy/aoll 



JERRY'S tWHOLESALE 

CARPET tsrpat riiiTiiiants 
and vinyl remnants. 504 
Yuma Monday- Friday. 
8:30a.m - 5:30pm Sat 
8a.m.- 12pm Open to the 
public 

4»| 



Computors 

MONITOR RERUR. quldi 
and reliable service Free 
pick up end delivery. Call 
Inland 77e-0311 

PACKARD BELL Pentium 
120MHZ tSMBRAM. 284 
modem. 4XCD t^ irwh 
monitor, $800, call Ketby 
between 7p.m lOp.m, 
565-0281. 



4«| 

Pots and 
SwppHos 



BABY UMBRELLAS. Blue 
and gold Macaws. Kahnns 
Macaws, sweet, hjn, cuddly 
rare Love Birds. CotiiBtilst. 
53» 1177 



^JA. 


i^irT 


Advertise m 


in Ihe • 


Classifieds, /i 


Kan^its Slate I tillcgtan 



Sportlftg 
fiqutpmont 



GOVERNMENT SUR 

PL US 1 1 Camnuflsge cloth 
ir>g, l>oot*, rainwear, wool 
Clothing AtsoCARHARTT 
WORKWEAR Monday 
Friday 9a m 5 30p.m. Sat 
urday 9a.m.. 5pm St 
Marys Surplus Sales, St 



Marys. Kansas. 1 785)437 
2734 



Storoo 
Iqulpmont 

ALPINE CD changer model 
5970. Like new 539 4058 



Tlekota to 
Buy/8«ll 



SELLING FOUR KSU KU 
football tidiets faking 
t>esl offer by Octobur 31 
Call (3161492- 1521 and 
leave message with an off 
er. Seats are located in the 
north end rone, gpnnral ad 
mission 

TICKETSWANTED: KSU- 
Colorado foottjali game 
Student section or other 
Will buy one or two Call 
collect 17851331-2031 
lOnm 8pm or 1 785)841 
SJ<i4 9() ni 10a m 

WANTED K STATE vi 
Colorado lickoli Will buy 
any number of tickets. Call 
bullnci <913l 829-7350. ask 

for Mary. 



riiTti 




fO) 



TRANSPORTATION 



Atitofnoblle» 

1979 FORD LTD station 
wagon, 537-2822 after 
5p.m, Use lor hunting. 
Iishing and tailgate pitnics. 

1985 MUSTANG GT con 
vertibie cusloniired Too 
many new parts to list 
Must seel $5600 or best 
offer 587-927 T 

PAINT IT PIMPLE per 

feet for lailgate. all equiped 
197 9 Winnebago motor 
home, good iiondilion 73K, 
rensonatil+i 539-4783 

uol 



Motorcyclos 

1989NtNJAeO0ft Jetted, 
custom pipaa, bte>eMfas 
Runs grn,tt $1850 or h>ir,i 
offer. 539-8925 

1994 KAWASAKI Ninja 
250. Black, purple. 
665-0242 

FORSALEVamaha 1992 
Sec*, red. sfiaip $2999 ur 
best oftiT hVi 0793 




SPMNO SREAK SB- Ma 

/atlan witti College Tours 
Airlare, seven rughts hotel, 
transfer*, ptirtun For 
brochurn or eerninf^ EREE 
trip t BOO 395 4896 
Iwww ciplleyr*luurs,comi 

SPWNO SREAK BS' Free 

food and drinksi Cancun. 
Bahamas, Jamaica and 
Florida from S399 Organ 
i/e a srnall group oihI trev 
et tree I Highest commis 
sion* and lowest prtcesi 
Call Surf & Sun Tours to 
tiecome a campus reprp 
santalive 1800)574 7577 

'■SPRING BREAK 'Take 
2' ■* Hiring RepsI Sell 15 
Take 2 Free Honest Oesti 
f\aiionsi Fri-n Parties. Eols 
and Drinks SunSplash \ 
80a426 7710 



WE KICK ADSI 
WE KICK ADSI 
WE KICK ADSI 




[TlfW Whethpr you'rr buying or sellltiK iIik 

LUj fall, Ihf? CoUi-fjlan rliisslflfdH Jtitvt' 

whul you niTtJ! Our dcith art* Ifuturfct 

dally tor thr 20.000 <4ludi'iiiK ^ntl 

5,000 Tarulty afix)is*s ciimpiiA. 

ICvNSAs Statk Collkc;! \\ 

103 Ketlzle S32-6SIIS 



t39»»»e FORs4l 
aditmg. proof n 



In tfie Msnhatlsrv Ft Riley 
eree stariiiig December 
1997 Must be able to 
yvork independently and 




CiossifiedRATES 
1 DAT 

20 wordk or l«S 

J7,15 

eoch word over 20 

$ 20 per yrord 

3 DAYS 

20 worcts or less 

S8 40 

Mch word over 20 

$.25 per word 

3 DAYS 

20 words or less 

19115 

each word over 20 

$ 30 per word 

4 DAYS 

20 words or lest 

$10.20 

eocK word (jver 20 

$ J3 per wotd 

5 DAYS 

20 words or less 

J 10 70 

eoch wof d over 20 

J 40 per vrt)id 

{ conieculive doy role | 



HOW TO PAY 

Ali cbssilieds must be 

paid in advance urdess 

you hove on account 

wilh Sfudent 

Publicalions Inc 

Cosh, check. 

MojiefCard or Viso ore 

occepied There is a 

$10 service charge on 

all returned checks 

We reserve ihe right lo 

edil, reject or properly 

clossify ony od. 



FRf E FOUND ADS 

As service lo you we 

run Found ads lor three 

doys free of charga. 



CORRECTIONS 

rt yov find on erioi ir 

J^ewt qd, pteote coll uv 

Wb O0C8pl lesponsii^N, 

ly onfy for die fitil 

wrong mseilion 



CANCEUATIONS 

II you sell your iiem 

before your od hos 

expired, we will retund 

you lor fhe remaining 

(kjys You must i;oll us 

betore noori i^e doy 

before the od is to be 

published 



HEADUNES 

For on extro charge, 

we'll put a headline 

above your ad lo catch 

ibe raoder's ntleflhon 



000 



BULLETIN BOARD 



ri'j 

HtJU'ilNG/nKAL IITATI 




SCRVICC DintCTORV 



EMPLOVMENT'CAniCnS 




TO PUCE AN AD 

GotoKedtie 103 
(ocrosi from itie K^lnte 
Student Untofi| 0#ice 

hours ore Uohdoy 
through Fridoy fron\ % 

m to5 p.fTi. Tlte 

oHtce ti opeti axcnpi 

Oft holidays 



J-y ^ i -.J T '^ 1 



• * w % • i^rt V 



10 



KANSAS STATI COLUOIAN 



TUiSDAY, OCTOaER 28, }997 



Stocks 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

.J irjiling Jay thai hud jui^l 3(1 minutes 

remaining: 

]\k NY St plamttd to t>pt.-n Itwi.iy ut 
it^ tuirmjl Irour Id tt,-^uml: trading 

The wliirlw ind iiti ttyll Sired ri'tlais 
cuiT<;crii<i aKnit SoulhiMsl .\>ya\ s]iak\ 
economies, where mouniing trade 
dclK■l1^ have H'ni interest rates soanne 



:ind lix'ul eiirreneiev pliutgm);! 

leeihni; ihv market IVee-loll were 
coneerns lliai (lie hull market isemlintt^ 

"Ihe markel is irrulional in holh 
ditvetiom," said Itttan Helslti. leehuieal 
artalysi at Dam Bosmirih lu 
Minnea|>i)lis. Minn "lor a long lime il 
was ItHikmt: lor any evideitee lo giiisli il 
dp Nim. ihe huhhI Iws gliHrnictl uiul 
invcsli«s aa' Imtkinj! loi rcasofls to sell " 

While MiKks >himped IS Ireasiiry 
bonds hiiikcd Ihe Ireiid as investors 



sought Miler places lu put ihcir cash until 
the equity markets sieady. The rise in 
bond pnees pushed ilic yield on the M\- 
year Ireasiiry a key intluence on (xtr- 
rowiiiji eosis dimn toward \H liwesi 
le\ el sinee early IWfi 

The Nasdaq enniposite imtcx fell a 
record lt5Kl lo t.5.1Ml'>, hurl hy a 
phmge m lechnoltigy stiK'ks It was more 
ihan iwiec the prcMous biggest point 
drop The 7-pcreei»l slide was ihe liiurlh- 
hijigesi ever 



Fund-raiser 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 

"I had to tome," he said. "They v^ere 
doing this fur itic I had to be there" 

lach team took pledges per mile that 
was traveled 1 1 is esliinaicd Ihat SMNK)- 
S^.tMH) was raised by pledges and vitri- 
ttus other donations 

Alpha Tail Omega Presideni Jon 
freeman, senior in biology, said he 
ihinks It IS importani lor ihc house to 
support Khoadcs 

"We spend so nuieh money on other 
causes, il is abstdutelv essential thai we 



support our own brothet," he siiid. 

Ihe house is asking e\ery niemher to 
donate Ht ceiils a mile, which figures 
out lo be SI2 per person Additioivallv, 
iSJX) will donate part ol ilie inuncy it 
raises diiniig iis spring philanthropy to 
the John Rhoades Medical fund 

IVople wilh eysiic fibrosis sulTcr 
tfom chrttnic lung problems ami diges- 
live disorders 

t yslic fibrosis used lo be known as a 
children's disease, and the life evpecian- 
cy for people vvilh il used lo be very 
shwt 

fmlay. due to medical advances, tlie 
median hie evpectancv is around 25 



years Rhoades celebraled his 24lh birlh- 
day in May^ 

"Jiihn's one of my bcsi fnctids I've 
watched hint sutler with cyslie fibrosis, 
and I Mam him lo tiave the opportunity 
liv have this chance." t'herra said. "He's 
doing a h»i be Her than a lot of people, 
bill It gels progressively worse" 

Il IS estimated that ihc tirsi year iifter 
the transplant has been eoniplelcd 
Rhoades' medical bills will lotal 

The money raised by the "1211 
Mithouse Mile to Manhattan" will be 
put into the John Khuades Medical I uniL 
which w ill go toward his transplant. 



Suit 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

ptisitive tenure decision al the appropri- 
,ile lime " 

I l4ihori's suit sjul the dean's review 
was "largely disregarded" ,I1 his tenure 



review If I l-dlioits pcrtoiinancc .is a 
faculty tncmbei was lacking, the suit 
argues, Nicholls was "grossly negligeni" 
by mil mroiining hiin 

t l4ihoii called on the faculty gtiev- 
iinee conunitlec to hear his case allet his 
tenure was denied Ihc suit e la tills he 
w as aNe to prov e I he 1 1 n i v crs H y s I a i liia' 



lo coiiipty w ith Its ow n temirc pri>cess 

However. Jon WefaUl as president of 
K-Siale, iiplield Nicholls' original tee- 
ommendaiion ,iiid again denied 11- 
(ihon's tenure lor Ibis, t l-ldion mimes 
Wcfald and Ihe university in the suit 

Nicholls ,nid t'earce tniib declined 
ciimmciit I iTintcs could not be reached 



Privilege 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

S 1 5.(tO<) jt the beginning of the year lo 
spend iin thai year's expenses and wliiitev - 
cr moncv exceeds ihc S I IMMMNI cap w ill go 
back to die privilege fee reserves aceiiiini 
"If ytiu give us mure money, then more 
iTioDcv iMiislcrs back inio your aeeouni 
giving viui more llevtbihlv in ihe long 



PIZZA 
SHUHLE 

DEUVERt 

I^SOOCIaflinRoadJ 



mn." Thomas said 

The commiiicc anieiided the hill (or 
Siudcnl Pnblicalions Inc 's ciiuipmenl fee, 
which was mtriHliiced lo Student Senate on 
thursday 

The ( nmnmtee and Sliideni 
Nhhcations Imvc heen Jchating the equip- 
ment fee lor weeks Ihe lee, originally 
funded for tour years, was cut lo two years 
and now is up lot reviav ti»r a second iwo 
vears 



Members of die Privilege lee 
( iimniiltee sent ihe Student Publication 
equipment tee to Senate, hui did so unfa- 
vurahly Aaron fruax. commiliee vice 
ehatr. said he could not support an addi- 
tional Iwo years when St'naie already 
decided tin Iwo years 

"I persomiliy feel thai Ihts allows us the 
iitmosi control of the fee." |[ua.v said. 
"Senaie passed ihis lor two years, ami t 
lliink il should M.iv that w.iv" 



mxxxxjuaxjjjfJFjasjjJtjjj.j.'ryTyjyjxf.xvr.T.t 



A Reminder To All 
Arts $ Sciences Students.. 

Enrollment time is quickly 
approaching so make an early 
appointment with your advisor. 

Arts & Sciences Council 



: 



n-t-t-t't-t-t-n-t't-t't't-t-rrt-f-t-t'f'rrp-rrrrrt-vTtt 



Leadership Studies Minor 

I>i>V('l()pliit< Ki)i)ulrili;t'>il)lr. ctlilrul. carjtii4. 
h'iifliTs (or .1 (livrrsc world 
Informational Meeting 
Thursday. October 30th 
4:00 p.m. 
Union 208 



Leadershhi Studies is 

a program in the 

DeDartment ol 

tucational 

Adi^instratlon anj 

Leadership, CoH^ge of 

EjlutTatlon 

tntormulliiit. call nr slop by (he olilcf ul l.^'adcrnhlp SiiKtlrn unit l'ruKraiii>>, 2Ufi Huliuii Halt. 5:l2-fKHI6 



Itilotm.itioital I'lescnted Hy. 

Vi Rolu'ri Shivp. rtt>leNM,H v>f f:duc<ilional Administration and 

Le<tdctship 


Df Susan M. Stoii 
of lA'adei^hi|iSlitd 


Associate IVaii ot stiKtcni Lite, 

es ami Proitranis 


Director 


-WD BV Students Curxcntly Eiitolled in the minor: 
Atidrcv AhKvii 
MarcelUi Burks 
[itstiii Kasiitcr 
Rv'.in LiiiderMilk 
Leo f'RIETO 









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OFFICIALLY LICEIVSED MERCHANDISE 




BIGGEST SELECnON-LOWHTPRHH 



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OVER ''■**'*^ WtA ^_ ^^^^0%^ 

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CKI AT I Ml SPICIAIS 



Game 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

'*itls itlli'ii Ilea! lit K' aiminci'd .iiul 
ciK'iniMjxcd llul ;i liiliiri; i> oen pusM- 
Wi- for thfm Ik- siiitl Miidcnts iKOil to 
k' i;\piiscd 111 new ami cvciliiii! e.itccr 
t'lu»n:cs llii'v uImi need to develtifi 
hii<iic Tikills to iminii^L' their intti futures 
inMead ul le tying oti Mtmcime else tti 
(lull 

The K-Siate Stock Maiiei Ciaine is 



open to everyone in KatiMs there are 
four divisions: elcmenur>. middle 
!>chtiul, high sehiHil and eolleyc, whieh 
includes anyone else who wants to par- 
lie ipnte 

The ^ittne eunsiitis of teams inve.it- 
mg a hypolheticiil SKKt.lKKI ti>r a l(). 
week period, in eoinmon ^iioeks lifted 
on the Amerieun Slock t'xchaiige. the 
Nasdaq Stack Markel and the Neu Ytirk 
Stuck t uhiinjte. 

The simulalion is offered in iwo lor- 
mals Panicipanis can pluy the game 



iisinji eilhei pre-prinicd s\an >heeb that 
they mail in each week of via the 
Internet An entrv tiv of S2(i per team is 
assessed lo cover mailing and eominu- 
meat I on costs. 

the lop 5 percent ot teams that earn 
the most money receive medals. :md 
ccriiiieates are issued to everyone who 
panieipaies 

The nexl lO-wvels session will hegin 
teh 1.^ lor the scan sheets and Ich 14 
on the Iniernel The online version will 
also be inailable during the summer 




Missed breakfast? Don't miss the Cotlegian. 

Get the news online. 

cotlegian.ksu.edu 










'All You Can Ear 
$399 

Lunch Buffet 11 -2 



Dine-In 'Carry-Out •Delivery 

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■Uan Jot«, CotlA Rica 

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iNmi lo 4 Thoateis in Uie Wi>'.(M'lf '-,iiiHi[>ifii] Cetitoii 

» Offf mpifi: 11/30/97 • Appttt only to Monhottgn Locotton 



You missed the ^ame to work the conceeelon eland. 

You spent your Saturday cleaning the highway. 

You studied hard to make that honorary. 

Get Recognizedl 

More than 250 organizations make K-State qreat. 
Make sure your group is in the 1998 Royal Purple 




These organizations are scheduled 
to have their pictures taken on 

Wednesday, October 29 



6:00 p.m. - UPC Executives 
&\20 p.m. - Solar Car 



Pictures will be taken m Mi*C !.un 524. 
Ihc Rijy.ll I'urplc yearbook eaii be purtli.iwd at tins tnni- far $24.'>.S. 

Schedule an appointment for your organization in 103 Kecizic for $15. 
You can jileo get m sound byte for the CP-ROM supplement for $5. 






R O V A L 



Ctiniaii tl)r Kiiy.il I'lirpk- m: 

Itil Kcl/ictUlt 

{7K5} !i.l2-(.?i'>7. rpKikMn-dii 

hltp:// www.ipiib.kiu. •Uu/rp/ 




< 

COUfGWN 

DIRtaORY 

Ni,'..,.. , v. 

532-6556 
532-6560 
532-6555 







STATE 




THINK TRAFFIC IS BAD 
ENOUGH IN MANHAHAN? 

^ Jonariiafi Winlctar leeli ihe city't many propos- 
oli lo cut down traffic congestion will only furlKer 
compound IraFfic problems. 

See OnNION, Poge 4 




ETC. 

In lerfay'i papf 

Bfiefi 2 

Divefsionj 9 

In tomorrow's popar 

Big )2 boikelboll preview 



K- STATE PUYER FtNDS SUCCES 
ON FIELD DESPITE ASTHMA 

^ K-Stole wide receiver Oovin PaH«s is conitanHy 
hampered on the field by onolhier obshjcle — Kit 
oslhmo 



See SPORTS page 6 




Oiofift 29 1997 
WEDNESDAY 




HIGH 




5S 


LOW 




34 


Pailty cloudy wilh 


a soulti 


wiftd Irom 


5 to SO 


mph 




loinqhr, 


increo 


sing 


cloiidmesi to motn 


.r,g 






f. t>r < 


•.' Pi'.- 





Faculty pay raises inconsistent with cost of living increases 



^ ll riKia good thingT 

The ecjiiorioi booid leeh 

ihe salory increases huri 

iKe qudiiy of educoton 

Seepogel 



AMtnMATHU 

Salaries for K-Stalc faculty 
nicmbcr.s have not kept up w iih cost- 
ol'-living incrcasfs. nor ha\o raises 
been comparable to those of cenlral 
adminislralors. 

James C'oflman. University 
provost, said salariv?^ arc not ajjui^t- 
cd ba.scd on inflation rates. 

"Raises arc based on annual g>cr- 
formance." Coffman said. "The 
dcpartincni heads and the dean have 
a role in determining the merit of the 



faculty," 

Every individual department has 
its own system for evaluating facul- 
ty. Martin Otlenheimcr. prttfcssor of 
anthropology, said. 

"Usually one is evaluated on the 
basis of ser\'ice, research and teach- 
ing." he said. 

That can mean a faculty 
member mghl not receive a raise at 
all. 

"There's no cost of living 
increase for all practical purposes." 
Cuffman said. "Raises are deler- 



mined on a men I system exclusive- 
ly" 

C'ofl'man said the average salary 
increase in the past seven years, for 
both faculty and administration, has 
been around 3 percent 

"In a few isolated cases, there 
*ill be larger increases," ("otfman 
said. "But Ihe hig middle is going to 
be a lot closer to the average." 

However, when those isolated 
cases involve top adminiitralion, it 
tends to be a big concern for some 
faculty. 



"On average, wc are jsiurcd itiai 
they are about the same percentage," 
Jim Legg, hicuhy Senate president, 
said. "The problem is thai people 
tend to notice the top administrators 
and compare their raises lo the aver- 
age faculty raise" 

[•at Bosco, dean ot students life, 
received a salary increase from 
S«4.20(f to S97,500. an increase of 
I3 64pcreeni 

In the same fiscal year, the 
increase was 4.56 percent liir both 
C'ofl'man and Hob Krause. vice pres- 



ident for institutional advancement 
Jim Slruve, director of the bud- 
get office, completes a comparison 
report of faculty and administrative 
increases. 

"Based upon 'near final' calcula- 
tions. I show that Ihe average facul- 
ty salary increase was 4 (M percent, 
the administrative increase was 3.8 1 
percent and the increase for all sialT 
in nty study was 4 percent. " Struve 
said. 

A source of tension with faculty. 
Otlenheimcr said was thai whtle the 



average administrative salary 

increase was lower than faculty, thi 
distribution of that increase vva' 
Mtmetimcs lopsided 

"When you lake a look at centra 
administration, you see 5-pcrcen 
raises and higher." he said. "Pcopit 
start vvondcring about it " 

Hovvever. t'olTman said the gen 
CTal procedure is to keep facultj 
salary increases higher ihan those o 
administration. 

See SAURIES, Page 12 



Committee looks 
into distribution 
of Vet Med funds 



luniutK 

The F'acully Affairs Committee of 
faculty Senate is sending a letter to 
the Provost's (Kfice detailing cim- 
cerns about the distribution of funds 
by the t'ollege of Veterinary 
Medicine. 

The committee received concerns 
from faculty members within the col- 
lege about how certain funds were 
distributed for teaching and research 
awards. 

The cominillee reviewed the con- 
cerns and decided to pass the matter 
lo Ihe Provost's Office for further 
review 

"We hivc£ome ULthn cwnclumon. 
that there is reason m be concerned," 
Brad KcmvMck, committee chair, said. 

Tcnwick stepped away from lead- 
ing the rev icw because he is a faculty 
member m veterinary medicine 
George Keiser. from the Department 
of English led the committee in this 
case. 

"Its a question of whether there's 
been a misuse of funds," Keiser said 



Keiser said money is given in a 
variety of ways to support teaching 
and research initiatives and to reward 
individuals for specific accomplish- 
ments 

The question the committee had 
was whether faculty had the opportu- 
nity to apply and compete for the 
money 

"My understanding is that it is a 
matter of disagreement of hovv the 
funds were distributed." Provost 
James Coffman said. 

The committee's letter to the 
Provost's Oflice will communicate 
the specific concerns After that, the 
matter will be handled by that oflice, 
Kiciiwr wid. 

[kspite the inquiry, there is no 
proof of any errors or wrongdoings. 
Keiser said. 

"This kind of thing can easily be 
nothing at all. or it can be something," 
he said 

The Dean's Ofl'icc of the College 
of Veterinary Medicine declined to 
comment, asking that all inquiries be 
directed to the Provost's Office. 



New course taught 
on World Wide Web 



■a 



4Jll rcpurtL-r 

"Power teaching" describes the 
newest course taught on the World 
Wide Web by the Department of 
Electrical and ( omputer F'.ngineering. 

The metaphor is used to describe a 
class that deals with power systems 
and distribution, Anil Pahwa. profes- 
sor of clectncal and computer engi- 
neering, said. 

"The way wc are doing it had 
become very powcrfiil," Pahwa said 

The course, 
flexible 
Control of 
Distribution M <eti wt eoch hod 

Systems, is expertise m our oreo, 

taught u.sing a ond if w« got logefhtr 
computer ^ £(,„ redly do neol 

hooked up to a ^,^, 
big-screen 

television A •JWIWlwa 

three-way con- p^ ofeisw of elecirsal 
ferenee call IS andcom|>jt.r 

set up using a engineering 

spcakerphonc ~ ^ 

in the middle '' 

of Ihe room. 

The University of Missoun-Rolla 
and the University of Arkansas arc 
connected with K-Stale by the tele- 
phone All three places have access to 
the matenal taught through a Web 
Mite. The course is taught by initiating 
a session before class on the Web. The 
link IS only u^ible dunng class lime 

Three students are enrolled in the 
course at K -State, one is enrolled in 
Missouri and a professor is in 
Arkansas 

Kraig Qtcjmc/^k, asMKiale pro- 
fessor at the University of Arkansas, 
Will teach the second half of the 
course to the ttudents. 

Video tapes were made for the hIu- 
dents at other univcnitics in the past 
and shipped to them within two days. 
Pahwa said 

"Tlte original inicfil was to have 



interaction somehow," Shclli Starretl. 
assistant professor of electrical and 
computer engineering, said "The 
video tapes were jusi a beginning " 

Pahwa said the video tapes weren't 
successful because there was no inter- 
action between the students and the 
professor Students who watched ihe 
tapes couldn't ask questions. 

Starretl, who taught Ihe course last 
fall, said the dcapartment has also 
tried video conferencing. However, 
this had to be done by renting space in 
D<jlc Hall and there were often prob- 
lems wilh the resolution and clarity of 
the text, she said 

Atk'r listening to a speaker on 
campus, the idea of an Internet course 
was initiated Starretl said. 

"Wc could do It all in our own 
building," she said "The only thing 
we lost was seeing ibc people live, but 
the students can still type on the 
screen and the telephone offers voice 
interaction We wanted to keep die 
interaction as much as we could like a 
classroom." 

The course originated from a 
group of five teachers in electncal and 
computer cngincenng from the three 
universities Pahwa described the 
course as a joint effort by the group. 

"Wc felt we each had expertise in 
our area and if we got together wc can 
really do neat things," he said. 

Tile group wrote a proposal to the 
National Science Foundation a.sking 
to create two classes, the cuneni class 
and FIcxiHc Control of Traa^mission 
Systems Members contributed to the 
proposal by writing about their area of 
expertise. 

The proposal was submitted along 
with 442 others from across the coun- 
try. Kifty-nine proposals were then 
tubmittcd to the second stage and I S 
received grants, Pahwa said 

The Univerjtty of Missoun-Rolla 

SeeTKHNOUX>Y,Poo«12 



A citizens 'group is opposed to the proposed Anderson Avenue expansion, hut the city 

engineer says the proposal will decrease congestion. Members of the citizens group say 

pedestrian and hicvcle safety should he considered in addition to traffic flow. 

OPPOSING VIEWS 



'>^ 


.^^^^Sm 


n 


^^^^B^lft '^ ^^, 


■Th^SeventeeNTH 
^ s Street I 




1 


=r 


■ 


\ 


_, — .^ ^. _ ^ 


ii- ^* .. ^ ■- 1 









CARS RUSH by 

the intersection of 
1 7th Street and 
Andefion Avenue 
during rush hour 
Monday otound 
4 45 p.m. 
Anderson Avenue 
is currently under 
exponsion 
development 

CLjr PAMIMIC 



City defends merits of Anderson Avenue proposal 



UNMMIN YOOfl 

The expansion of Anderson 
Avenue from Ibth Street to Sunsei 
Avenue has sparked controversy from 
some 

community 
members, but 
Manhattan city 
officials 
defend the 
merits of tbc 
proposal. 

Jack 
M e s s e r , 
Manhattan city 
engineer, said 
the goal of the 

project IS to provide a safCT Anderson 
Avenue 

"It's going to reduce congestion 




M«si«r 



and potential lelt-tum accidents, " he 
said 

Bill Muir. member of the 
Anderson Avenue stcenng committee 
and assistant to the vice president for 
institutional 
advancement, 
agreed the pnv 
ject will reach 
its goat of 
decreasing con- 
gestion. 

"The pur- 
pose is to 
relieve the con- 
gestion on 
A nderson 
Avenue 
between Sunsei and I6lh Street and 
especially between i'^ih and Denison, 
where it is exasperating " 




MacForiand 



However, sotitc Manhattan resi- 
dents believe decreasing congestion 
should not come at the expense ol 
pedestrian safely, 

t>ave Maclarland. associate pro- 
lessor of journalism and member of 
Anderson Widening Area Residents' 
I nclave. a citizens' awareness group 
again<>t the pro|cci. said pedestrian 
safety should have been considered 
more 

"I can sec why something that 
would improve safely would be desir- 
able, but It's siifety for people in cars 
basically." MacFarland said "1 con- 
tend that because so little is being 
dune for pedestrians and bicyclists 
that safety for those people is actually 
made worse " 

See PROPOSAL, Pag« 13 



WANT TO OfT INVtXVIDT 

A public ir^torrnahon mevhng oboul ibe 
•■paniion of And»rion Av«<iu> will be cri 6 
p.m Hen t3 inUni<m213 
WANT TO H INrOMWDT 

• Th« coil gt th« Andorsgn ajcpon^ion \\ pro- 
l«cl*d to b« $4 65 fnillion. 

• Ih« roodwoy profvcl ilwU *ill cotl about 
(3 5 million, wilh Ihe Kanxu Daparim«tii of 
Tronipoffation Funding 75 p*rc#rit of ihol COil 

•The reft! will corrw from i^^efol ftjnding or«oi 
wilh lite ciV including tix ilorfn mono^enwni 
(und, the Cily/Univerjlly lax Fund ar\d □ gen- 
•fol obligalion bond 

• Th« projecl will eipand AnderKw Awnue 
frofvi t6lh Streisl to 5un$«l Av«nu« A lefi-rurn 
lone will stieKh the Isnglh of itie pfofecl and o 
fiflhi-igin lone lof northbound hirm from 
Anderion lo Deniion avanuei wiH be oddtd 



Anderson expansion project may affect foot traffic 



OMJorni MifY 

If Ihe proposed Anderson 
Avenue expansion project is 
approved, students living on 
the south side of campus will 
have to cross up to two extra 
laneii and an additional 4S 
feet to reach campus. 

Foot trafTic is also signifi- 
cant to neighborhood busi- 
nesses and students attending 
mass at St. Isidore's 
University Chapel. 

'We have a little over 
2, 1 XX I students who walk to 
church every weekend and a 
significant amount of .stu- 
dents who cross Anderson," 
Keith Weber, chaplain at St 
Isidore's, said. 

Few trees on the St. 
Isidore's property will be 
removed, but the expansion 
will si)tniric«mly ehange the 



landscape and add to the 
noise level inside the church. 
Weber said 

"It's a mixed feeling for 
me, " he said "1 see a need for 
better traffic flow but the 
expansion will impact our 
space here in terms of sound 
and traffic closer to our 
building." 

The sound of traffic was a 
concern for St Isidore's even 
before Weber joined the 
pansh m July Attorney John 
D. Conderman worked on 
behalf of St Isidore's to reach 
compromises with the city 

To combat the sound 
problems, St Isidore's will 
install double -paned glass 
over the chapel's stained 
glass windows A sound bar- 



Widening Anderson Avenue 

The inletswclion ol Oenison ond Anderson ovenuei v*ill chorvge dioilicolly ober the pioposod Anderson 
•xponsiofi A left turn lone for both directions and a righMurn lone for westbound traffic turning onto 
Oenison will essentially double llie width of Anderson. Turning radiuses will be enlarged The oclviol 
crossing dislonct altbe crosswolii will be 93 5 feet. However, ibe ocIuqI width of ifie rood will be 72 
feel New pedestrian crossing lights are designed to change only during inte<vati of low traffic This 
could pose o problem for sludenls trying to gel lo class 

St. laideret 




SM POOTt Pog« 12 Collect Cily dl MoflhdiKu. 



ANMIW MAtONUUC/Colbsn 



r 

DEADLINES 




TOnAaANIflM 


iF^^Bu 


in lh« Daily Ptannor, 


^Ll£^B 


itop by K«dzie 1 1 6 
"• ond fill cwt a fofm 


^^>4 


or •■mail it lo 




ct^kgnWiiuedii 


wttiAONo itmot 


by 1 ) am rwo clayt 


mimn 


before it it to run. 


*imx\ /Mir)f#kiv idhi 



KANSAS STATE COUEGIAN 



W 




9 7 



NEWSrewind 

Newi Ktwind cdkcli lh» top cotnput, local, jtoW, nahonol and worti ntwt ft^cm ih* palf 4S hourx SriWi are colkcttd from 
win and tksK itpwH 



ABC will oppeol Food Lion vsrdict 

CHARIOTTE. N C - Evan though the (ury'i puot 
hve damogss award in ffw Food Lion cow Kos been 
iloitwd by mort Aon 90 pwceni, ABC News ii W- 
lowing through on ih promiie to appeal itw verdict to 
Q higher court 

The company filed the nistice of appeal Monday to 
the 4lh U.S. Circuit Court ol Appeals in Richmond, Vo 

Thii surnmei, the trial judge reduced the puntlive 
damages owofded in Januory to lh« North Carolina 
wpermorket chain from $5 5 million to $315,000 

"ABC will challenge the findirig that it) journalists 
committed froud, trespass ond breoch of loyolty oi 
well OS challenge the imposition ol punitive damages,' 
ABC News said m a statement 

Food lion denied the occurocy ol ihe 199! 
'PrimeTime Live' expose that occused it of unsanitary 
proctKes, but ihe corripony did not sue the network lor 
libel or slander. The grocer insteod proved the network 
lied to gel jobs lor undercover reporters wtio (hen wore 
ipy cameras and hidden recorders. 

Man sentenced to lethol injection 
for killing couple during robbery 

MEDfOSD. Ore - When pdice oriesled Robert 
AcremanI for murdering a lesbion couple m o botched 
robbery, he asked police iF they would help him gel the 
deoih penohy 

Attorneys for Acretnonl, 29, taid he hod chorvged 
his mind aflei six ntonths in prison ond was hoping for 
life in prison But o unanimous (ury on Morvdoy sen- 
tenced him lo die by injection. 

The former trucking comporty efficiency expert 
looking for money to win back a stripper who hod 
spurned him pleaded guilty to killing Koxonne Ellis, 53, 
and Michelle Abdill. 42. in December 1995 

Aher luring them to an apartment, ht tried to force 
them lo write him $50,000 in checks frortt their prop- 
erty manogemeni business 

When they refused, he bound ond gagged ihem 
with duct tope ond breed ifwm to lie m the bock of o 
pickup truck next lo boxes contoining o Christmas tree 
and present for Ellis' gronddovghler Eoch wos shot 

Two months before Ellis and Abdill were killed, 
police soy, Acremant shot Scott George of Visolio, 
Calif , the son of his molfter's friend, after o night of 
drinking in what was supposed lo be another robbery 



Fie confessed lo that slaying, loo. but has nol entered 
pleo ond o trio I dole is pending 

Astronaut to become 1 st person 
to exercise right to vote in spoce 

SPACE CENTER, Houston - For ihe finl lime tn his- 
tory, on American aslronaul is about lo exercise his 
right lo vole while in orbil 

A ballot was sen! lo David Wdf aboard the Russian 
spoce station Mir, ihonks lo o new Texos low fl was 
prompted by John filoho's inability lo vote from M>i losl 
year 

Under the old low, on obseniee ballot had to be 
sent by US moil. But in June, Gov George W Bush 
signed a bill saying oslronauls registered to vole m 
Texas - wfwre most of them live - con cost balbts 
From space 

Using new software developed by NASA, Tony J 
Sirvello III, Harris County's elections chief, sent o balloi 
lost week to U S Highl controllers in Moscow, and they 
tronsmitted il lo Wall 240 miles obove Earth 

NASA plons to use iimilor softwore once ihe mier 
nolionol space stolton is up ond running Assembly of 
the stohon begins next summer 

Beverly Hills importer pleads 
guilty in faulty condom cose 

LOS ANGELES - The owner of o Beverly Htlls 
import company pleaded guilty lo bnbing on inspector 
to import ond disiribuie defective condoms from 
Moloysio 

Mox Noomi, 52, ttw owner of U C Imports, odmit 
ted Monday that he offered $2,000 to o Food and 
Drug Adminislfolion inspector os pari of a scheme lo 
conceol the distribution of 430,000 polenliolly defec 
live corvdoms and continue distribution 

Naomi hices up to 1 4 months in prison when he is 
sentenced Feb 6 Assisloni US Attorney S Robert 
Roskin Jr said he would try lo learn whelher anyone 
was harmed before prosecutors moke a sentencing rec 
ommendolion 

The cose led the FDA m Mcry 1996 lo worn con 
sumers in seven stales not to use condoms distributed 
under the names Pomilex, Maxi, Block Jock, Magic 
ond Ginio The states were Colifornio, Florido, 
Michigan, f4ew York, Rhode Island, Tennessee and 
Texas 



DAILYplanner 

Jh* Oatiy Ptonnei a liit CatHegttjn » campuj bUkhn boaid 
jefifice (Ifflii in lh» plonnw can be pubditwd up W ttvee 
iimet Itemi mi^hf nol oppeor becauie ol ipsxe (onilrainli 
but ore gvoianleed to apptat on the day of the CKlivily h 
phce an ilffl). ilop by Kedtie ' Id ond IJI out a tarn or * 
moil il to rolbgnOliu edu by I F a m two days bthn il u kj 
tun 

t /Uuh StMdent tervke* wtti tpontoi a browiv bog 
iunch foi odull nunliadiliofiaf tludonts from 1 1 a m Id I 
p m lodoy in Union Slalwooni I 

• The OnidtMle Sdwol has scheduled ih« f.noi ord 
def*n«i ol Ihe ijotlafd disse'lotion of Hom»d AiHoshon 
lor 1 p m lodtiy in Wolwi 32? 

• The Oradinle fdwol hns Khedul«d the hnoi dtqI 
dcivnte of the doclDrol d>SMilalion of Anil Manon for 7 
pm today in Waters 133 

• Tlie Orddwott Schoel hot tcH^duiMl ihr hnol oral 
d*ienw of the dixtorol duMiMliDn of Ming tu lor 2 p m 
today in Thraclmorlon 403 1 

• HHM will meet ai S 30 lonighl ol Java Espresso and 

baiiery tn Aggwvifiv 

• Th* Oradwolt Schoet fvn tctwJuM ((« hnoi oral 

delenw of the ctoclntoi d>vsei>aliori of Kiu;ti«n lu far 
10 30 a m ThuiHkiy m Shellwibrnger 704S 

• The OrodiMte School f<a» >cli«dul«d ih« Imol oral 
detgnM ol ih« drv.ioii)\ liiswiioiion of lo«l Payne for I 30 
f> m Thursdoy m Woleri 003G 

t The DivtMon ef tiolefy will pr«i«ni O Charl«i 
Cmlron at 4 p iri Tliyriday m Ackorl 32 1 



• K-Slsle Hertemon^ Afi 

hunighl in Weber I 'i'^ 



will invel ol 6 30 



• Studer)! Corner IteMorth Award* ol S500 are 
ovoilable br undergioduolc vtudenis in o li*allt> if luted 
d«giee program ApplKaiii>nk now OKOilobte m> Aclitf) 
413. oredu«byDtc 8 



POUCEblotter 

teptuii are iiiUn directly itom ^ K-Stolf and Riley Coumy police 
dipoflm»nl) daily log* VMdonat (ill wWf bet j or minor traffic viob 
iicins tyvOLTje ol jpote coojtroinli 

RILEYCOUNTY 

MONDAY, OaOKR 27 

• Al 2 36 p m . Jim Flogon, Greenleol, Kan , wos ortejied 
on Riley County warrant lor failure to appear Me was 
released on $500 bond 

• Al 3 14 p m , o lepoM wos filed by Dilloid DeporlmenI 
Store due lo the crimmol use of o financial cord Lost wos 
$598 

• At 3 5! p m , Jennifer Rippie, Red bud Estates, lot 182, 
was arrested on o Riley County worrani for worthless checks 
She was released on $ 1 50 bond 

• Al 4 36 p m . Alex Sooner. 527 Pierre St , was arrested on 
o Riley County worronl for three counts ol ciiminol domoge to 
property Bond was set at S 1 .000 

t Al 7 49 p m . Donald Wade, 2225 Browning Ave , was 
arrested on a Geary County warrant for impairing a security 
interest 

TUfSOAY, OaOBER 28 

• At 3 36 m , Biuce D Alewnder. Topeko. was orrestod 
for e scope from custody Fie was releosed on % 1 ,000 bond 

• At 1 ) 23 am , sloff ol Eisenhower Middle School, 800 
Walters Onve, reported o leocher hod tieen hollered 



Feed your head. 

News, with sports on the side. 



eo/fegion. frsu.Mfu 



^M&t 




r^ 



^Oafil\'£fifioNs 



Sometimei ihe Cotlogioi Tiokpi a mi&kiiie If a miikilie OOcuri. contact Jilt 
Slory monoging ediloi by phon« |5 326556). b^ »moil 
colfegn<Miu edi O' by slopping by the Collegian oi Kediie 1 1 6 



:55' 

low: 34 

TOOAT 

Partfy cloudy 

with south 

wind from hve 

to 10 mph 

Eaimuui 

^Mtighil, 

increaiing 

cloudiness 

loword 
morning. 



eSSMu 

lY PHONE 

S32-6534 

kwiv.r-.'.u< . 
532-6560 

CiAi:i(ifti: 
532-6555 

■TI-MAH 

CCWGNenSUftW 

■YMAK 

Kansas SMtt 

CotlEOMN 

Keo/k 1 1 6 
Kansas Siaie 

UMNIRSItY 
MAftHATTAN, KS 

66506 
MHISON 

iMt CcilfQAN 
NIWStOOM IS IN 

KtD;if 116 

(aC«0« FtCM 
tut K-SlAIf 

SnjofNT Union) 



I (USPS 2<il1 0201, a nudent newspoper oi Kon«os Siaie Uniywsiiy, is publisfted by Stwden* ftiUicxjhons Inc , Ki<lri© 103. Misnhnton <m 66506 Th(? Cdlegian is putJished weekdays dwrmg ih© school yew and twee o week throtgh ih« simnw 
Pwtodicol postage is poid ol AAonhollon. (ton 6650! flOSTMASffS Send oddieis c+Kingos to Kansos State Cdlogiorv. ciicutaliorv desk, K«dz« 103, Monhaltan, Kan 66506-7167 O KM^sJiS Sm(i T ^ • •■.N, ]^^ 



You missed the %ame to work the cor\ceee\or\ etand. 

You spent your Saturday c\ear\\r\q the highway. 

You studied hard to make that honorary. 

Qet Recognized! 

More than 250 organizations make K-Stftte great. 
Make sure your group is in the 1998 Royal Purpls 




These organizations are scheduled 
to have their pictures taken on 

Thursday, October 30 

6:40 p.m. - C0S6AM 

7:00 pm. - Wheat State Agronomy Club 

7:40 p.m. - American Institute of Chemical Engineers 



Pictures will be taken in McCain 324. 
The KoyaJ Purple yearbook can be purchased at this time for $24.^5. 

Schedule an appointment for your organization In 103 Kedzie for $15. 
You can also get a sound byte for the CD-ROM supplement for $5. 



1^ 




„TUOlO 
ROYAL 



Ctintact the RciyaJ Purple at: 

101 Kcdnc UM 

(7HS) '>J2-ftS57. rpf«Jk«i cdii 

htip; / / www, •|)ub.ktu.«du/rp/ 





WiDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1997 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Office schedules visitations, 
recruits students for K-Stote 



ASHUT TOUU 

StiiiJcnts whi> jipcnt ancrmKins 

meeting wilh idlffyc rvcmilcrs unrfor- 
■ii.iiul liinv much iliiisc diM'ussions mil 
iiiiprL'>>sioiis tx'i^iiiK' an impttnant t'ac- 
ti)r 111 da'iilm^ whcro lo jllvml colk'iic 
Nctt Sluilent Scrvitc> iit AntK'fsun 
flail spct'iali/i-!> 111 hi^'h ncIumiI avrmt- 

lUOIll. 

"A lol giH's initi H'ltin^ up a c<iiii- 
pii> M<iit," Stivin llaiisai, diaxior ul 
NSS, saul "Here iii the oirice we have 
1 1 students who Aitrk iltiring iho ilav 
Not tinly dti they do ofViee work, but 
the\ lire trained tour guides as »ell " 

Some uf the diilies in the olViee are 
scheduling campus usiis, preparing; 
maieriiils needed tor ihe Msits. prcpar- 
inj! special (ours and recruit ing o\cr 
the phnnc Us ,i p;iri of the tekvoutiM.'!- 
iiit> program, Hansen said 

"A lot of the recruttincnl priKCss 
starts with the admissions representa- 
tives," she said "riicy are the ones 
who go inio (he schools .ind sugfiesi to 
the students lo come tor a msii " 

To he J campus tour guide lakes 



haul work and preptirulion 

"Wc have to kmm evervthing ahoul 
K-Hlatc. uc have in be trainciL" said 
Manomav Mal.ilhip, liuii guide and 
senior (It marketing "We're a hig pari 
olihe recruninp process We are with 
Ihein lor an hoiii, so \h' have lo he pre- 
p:irc'd lo answer any i{iiesiuins Ihev or 
their parents nnghl haw " 

Not only do eainpus tour guides 
have til he kno^ledgeahle ahoui the 
university, hut ,it the s.miic time they 
have 10 he ahle to hav e lun and present 
the inlivrnuilion in an entertaining way 

"Wc look lor high -energy people 
vcho have had ii great K -Stale e\peri- 
ence. We like lor ihein to have a leani 
all nude and coiiunuitieatiiui skills." 
Hansen said 

All lour guides have their own way 
ol" giv tng tours 

"[ try mil to jnsi point out the build- 
ings " said Sara Reser, ttiur guide and 
(unior m marketing "I use my person- 
al oKpenences about K- State, trying to 
make friends wiih the prospeetive stu- 
dents so I hey I eel v^e re.illv care aboui 
them and ihcir decision lo come here " 



Most toiir> bejin m Anderson and 

go lo all mam pi>lnls ol' the eumput. 
including the residence halls 

"My lavofile building lo lalk about 
is Nichols k-eausc it has uii mierestmg 
history I he students like tii sec the 
icsidcncc halls Thcv like to see whai 
liv mg in dortns m college is all ah«Hit," 
Rcser said 

Tours are given three limes a day 
every wcx'kdav, Reser siiid "We also 
gi\e lours on Senior Days, during 
Homecoming and special group 
tours." she Siud 

As a nile model, the goal of the 
tmir guide IS lo rainilian/e the sludeitt 
v*ilh I he cumpus. and to make them 
leel comfonuble here. Malalhip said 

"ihey see K- Si ate hovs vvc see il I 
love knowing I have an impact on 
them and iheir decisions." she said 

"We want lo show ihc prospeciive 
siudcnis the bc'autiliil surroundings 
and Ihe wonderful atmosphere here a I 
KSlaie." 1 lansen s;ud " I hey are mak- 
ing an iiti]niiiani decision, and we're 
jitsi doing our pari io make thai deci- 
sion easier " 



Wall Street recovers 
from historic drop 



JUtOClATiD ntist 

SI W VOKK Wall Street made 
its best comeback ever luesdav Irom 
record point drops Monday, sineks 
nirncd in record gams luesdav on vol- 
ume ihat surp,is\ed one billion shares 
lor the lirsi nine 

While sU>ck prices phunmcted in 
Monday's selling spree, buyers rushed 
m lo pick bargains, aided by 
antuuinccmenis from eorpinite giants 
like ll-IM ol their iivcn niultibdiion- 
dollar sliare-repureluse plans 

Ihc IKm Jones mdusinal average, 
v»hkh losi ;i record 5.M 2() Monday 
and dropped ail .idditional PN potnts 
in the first hour of trading Tuesday. 
dramalically reversed course Ihe 
average of .It) blue chips ended the day 
up a lecord * W I "^ pouiis ut 7.44K..12 
The prcv lous biggest pninl gam, 
257 .In piiints, came Sept 2 

hiesday's 47-percent rise in ihe 
l)c>w was the tnppcii percentage 
lioutKe hack since the davs lolltminjj 
Ihc Oct l**. I?87. emk wBca tfie 



average plumineled 21 ii percent 

Droad-maiket tiideves also staged 
an iiieredihle turnaround, inehidmg a 
record rise by ihc Nasdatj comptisitc 
indes 

■'Must people realized that vie 
needed a correction by any stan- 
dard Ihc iniirket kv.is ovcrv.ducd" said 
Russ I abrasca. senior v ice president .il 
I'nneipal I maticial Securities ul 
Dallas ■■\ow, we ve had the pullKick 
thai brought the market back dow ii .nul 
(veopic were ready U* buy again " 

\tler three days of heavy losses, 
capped bv Monday's rout, investors 
bought up slocks luesdav. ihc eve of 
Ihe ''Nth aiiniversarv ol the (ireal 
trashol |42*> 

Igniling that rise was a sign ol con- 
fidence in the sitKk market fnmi IHM 
(. orp , which announced early ni 
the trading day that il would buy 
up to V.V5 billion worth of its own 

sKKk 

Its mcwT not only pushed its mvn 
stock up yi V lo ^'O 17. bui It also 

S^ WAU STREET, Page M 



Volatile stock market 
leads to active day 
for Kansas brokers 

AtfOCtATID NIUI 

WKHIIA KcvinLwislook 

il lot of cat lit Tuesday investors 
wanting to sell stotk. even more 
looking for bargains and some who 
jusi need reassurance 

Monday's hiskiric drop in (he 
slcxik market, followed by Iiic-MJay')t 
surprising r.ill). made for a busy 
day for Lewis, a siotk broker for 
Fdward Jones in Ikrhy Hut ihe 
volatile markci wasn't expected to 
hau" a large ctteet on the state's 
economy t)r industries 

Alter a historic 554.2h-piiim 
drt>p Monday, the stiKk market 
came hack wilh a surpnsing rally 
For every investor who ciilled 
Lewis wanting to (iell slock, there 
were five more who wanted to buy 
stocks at the k«^er pnccs 

"Thcv arc taking advantage of 
this," Lewis said 

Bui Ihc rapid ups and dovin of 
the market were making some 
investors unconilonablc. 

$«• KANSAS, Po9« 12' 



$5 off"; ^^_^^'"cg| 



I 

1 Any Service i 

I Expires 12/I.V97 | 

Has Moved 

AftfCfc lliilr KhnptTN In prtkiid In Hdd». 
.'%rllNlit* lli'Ml^ner & Ciilfir K|HH'inllNl 

Becky Blue 

Ciill If I miikt^ fin ii|i|ii»iiilm4*nl 
<785) 77H-:iiifMI 

Aggie Hair Shapers ♦ 1220 Moro ♦ Manhattan, Kansas ♦ 66502 




SAM SAOCm Ldl«g.Qn 

GRANT HOITHAUS, ^eshmon m busineii, poliihe^ th» whcelv of hn 300ZX Hman Hollhaus withvlood the cbilly weoth«i to 
waih and polish his cor 



If 4 1) « J c K t f t p f « / / f g i J It 



uaa. a^Oi. Jt a_i_L 



THf 0MICI«1 OUIDI TO K tlAII lOOIIAlk WIIKINO* IN IHI limi *f*ll 

Gatneday Manhattan is the All- 

Faothall Editian of the Callegian. 

Published an Home^game 

Saturdays. 

Fallow the Cats all the way to their 
FIFTH STRAIGHT BOWL. 

Pick up your copy at 



MAIslJJATTAIsJ . \C^ 



l/2l)J^iaj:00DllLLDfln0 c : 



|:4^£Vn CflJUM 



70C M maMuuiiim 



Local Bars & Restaurants 

Hotels 

K-State Student Union 

K-Rock live remote at the game 

Strecker Gallery 

Wholesale Beauty 

Little Caesars 

Flint Hills Computers 

A Cut Above 

Purple Pig 



• Breadeaux Pizza 

• Precision Auto 

• Rose Muffler 

• Baskin Robbins 

• Wildcat Creek 

• University Commons, 

• Otto's Bar-B-Q 

• Staten Auto 

• It's Greek to Me 

• Fhnt Hills RV 






iT. 



Nov. 8 K«wn*Nov.1S Cojggj^ 



C^//1LI|'^^^*^^'^***^^^'*^*^^^N-N>'^^^"^^'^NNS 





KANSAS STATE COUEGIAN 



OWNON EDtlOi 
MANMHOniO 

4 ■■^^■i^^ 




OURview 

Ouf yhw, an ediiohal 
t«lKt«d ond debated 
by ifie editoriol bowd. 
It wrrtlm ohef a 
mo|Oiily opinion i$ 
lormed The editotlal 
boord contisli of 
Collegian edilori ond 
ofher slofi nwnbwi 
Ow vi«w is rhe 
CoNegion't oAiciol 
opinion. 



Quality of university education hurt by diminutive faculty raises 



Dean of Student Life Pal 
BoscQ will receive a 1 3-per- 
cent raise ncm year 
Facutty won't even get 
eiKMigti uf a raise to keep up with the cost of 
living 

Who molds your future mon: the pro- 
fessors and instructors who challenge you in 
your curriculum or the guy who came to 
your high school to sell K'Statc? 

Students come here expecting the quali- 
ty of teaching a Kansas Board of Regents 



school should ofTer While administrators 
play a vital role at K-State, they should not 
become ncK off higher education ai the 
expense of faculty members who are teach- 
ing the thinkers of tomorrow 

About one- fourth of the Knpository 
Writing I classes for next semester wer«; 
closed because there wasn't enough money 
to pay people to leach them. When this is the 
case, the adm mistral ions worries about stu- 
dents taking classes like College Algebra at 
nearby community college outposts fall on 



deaf ears. Students go where the resources 

exist to serve them. 

Perhaps Hoseo wouldn't mind sharing 
s«ime of that \i percent with some of the 
departments and colleges. While it's true the 
money for salaries doesn't conic from the 
same accounts used to operate university 
programs, (he mere idea uf money car- 
marked for higher education used for l>- 
percent salary increases seems outlandish in 
such tight fiscal limes 

(Jur tuition fees might go up kxI sctites- 



tcr to help pay for a technology enhance- 
ment program Much like a pretty library 
with minimal research option.s, a shiny com- 
puter is worthless without stinieone to show 
students how to use it. 

Though a 1 3 -percent increase for one 
person might not seem like a lot, perhaps the 
administration could set a better example by 
holding themsches to the same standards as 
the faculty If things continue m the same 
vein, we'll have plenty of well-paid admin- 
istrators and plenty of empty classrixinis 



EDboard 



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IV 

the 



flkrieie 



ManHattan's 

building |?SaDS 



The City of Manhattan tralTic engineers continue their (thankfully) unique 
tradition of shi»» ing the rest of Kansas what not to do when constructing streets 
»nd planning traffic control devices. 

In addition to the already existing examples ofbad tiatfic planning, ranging 
from the close-together and unsynchronized stoplights on Tutlle Creek 
Boulevard to the fanatic insistence on protected led -turn-only lanes to the pro- 
liferation of unmarked dips at nearly every large intersection in the rental 
neighborhood immediately east of campus, the city wants to compound its 
errors 

f )ne plan under consideration calls for installing a roundabout at the inter- 
section of Manhattan and Claflin avenues to create a claimed 400-pcrccnt 
reduction in conflicLs. A conflict, in traffic 
engineering parlance and. for that matter, in 
everyday English is an opportunity for a col- 
lision between two cars Kvery car that goes 
ihrtJugh this intersection undergoes a conflict 
that begins with the approach and ends once it 
passes under the hanging signal light. 

The city wants to multiply the number 
of confticLs by replacing this intersection with a 
roundabout This would force cars to come to a 
stop at one feed into the roundabout (ars 
would then be required to turn right into the cir- 
cle, yielding to traffic already in it. 

This IS conflict number one. Then the 
car would be forced to go through the roundabout and past other feeds, each a 
inini-mier\ectitm in its own right. This adds still more conflicts. 

So the opportunities for the unwary motorist to crash and bum are multi- 
plied by. at minimum, a factor of two 

What benefits does this arrangement olfcK' So far there appear to be none 
It requires people to come to a full stop before entering the circle, which inter- 




; '■.> rj A t H Ik tl 
JONATHAN WtNKUN > a 



rupts traffic How and aggravates congestion Building the roundabout itself 
would entail closing the intersection for a few months in itself prohibitively 
inconvenient - and lemoving a few trees on the southeast comer 

Although the state is complicit in this scheme to the tune of several hundred 
thousand dollars, the city of Manhattan is still paying a huge chunk of money 
to do this, which could be better spent on making North 
Manhattan Avenue a curbed road with sidewalks north of the 
overflow parking lots. 

This plan also creates more difficulties for pedestrians 
Al the moment, a walker standing at any one corner can 
reach two others by crossing a single road, or a third by 
crossing two roads. With a roundabout, the same person 
will have to cross two roads to reach any comer, the 
chances of pedestrians being injured increa.scs with 
the amount of time spent on a paved surface at the 
same level as vehicle traffic 

Although a variety of mitigation strate- 
gics are possible, such as a fountain or 
small stand uf trees that could be planted 
m the empty space at the center of the 
roundabout, none of these can eclipse the 
basic disadvantages of high cost, 
increased opporiunity for accidents for 
both walkers and car drivers, disruption to 
surround 11^ structures and traffic during 
construction and congestion 

fhis traffic planning could make only 
Ivan the Ternblc proud No decent person 
would be excited by this addendum to a long 
history of harming or killing people and destroy 
ing cars. 




One woma^ ^(^Lruggle give^ 



READERSwrite 




K E V 

1 » 


N 






KEVIN lAHIY .'. a Moxy .,, »lt 



Marie is real. 
Very, very real. 

Mane heard Maiold enter the room. A wave of fear 
swept liver her It happened every time her parents left 
her with Harold and llelcn. She never got used to it. 

He leaned over the 
slender S-ycar old's 
shivering body He 
gently lifted her off the 
pallet of blankets on 
the floor. The stench of 
his body odor made 
Marie feel queasy. She 
could sen.sc the fear in 
her younger cousins. 
Jimmy and ftggy 

As he lifted her 
nighLshirt and began to 
touch her, Marie 
retreated to a place in 
her imagination that 
Harold could never find He could molest her body, 
hut he couldn'l touch her mind. 

Her parents came for her on Sunday. Marie said 
nothing. For seven years, this pattern was rq>caled 
for 27 long years, Marie said nothing. 
Afier her modier was taken to a mental institution 
when Mane was 1 2, she became mother to her four 
younger sisters Because their grandmother physical- 
ly ahtiseJ ihcm. she also became their protector, 

Al l'>. Mane finally escaped into an apparent 
Camelot She married a devout Catholic. By the age 
of 3 1 . Mane had two young boys, a handsome hus- 
band and an indescribable temper that she could not 
understand What Harold had done was a prison from 
which she could not escape 

One dark evening, everything came crashmg 
down 

She rcniiived the gun from the drawer She clum- 
sily loadcil the cartridges into the chamber. Her two 
sons. 7 and 1 1 , appeared in the doorway. 
"Momma'.'" 

'What, honey''" MiricTs voic< ww deathly calm. 
"Whatcha* doin"^" 

Mahc sat down on the edge of the bed without 
answenng. Thoughts raced maddeningly through her 
muddled mind Stilt. Ihe memory of Harold's ternblc 
crime hid somewhere m the dark Pei:esaes of her con- 
sciousness. The gun lay m her lap. Her oldest son look 
.1 c.uitious step tirward her, 
"tJtm't." 
He stopped. 
She stopped. 
Everything stopped. 




Time stood still for what^ld have been seconds, 
or even hours. How long she sai holding the gun, her 
boys in front of her crying softly, no one knows. 

The door burst open. 

Her husband, Bill stepped into the rottm. 

"Mane, there are some people here to sec you." 

She turned her head slowly. 

■'Oh'" 

"Yes, honey, they want you to give tiw the gun," 
Bill's voice tiembled as he looked at his two young 
sons. "Give me the gun." 

Two more people - a man and a woman - 
slipped quietly into the room. 

"Mane, we are- your fnends. Ptea.se put down the 
gun Let's talk " 

The soothing voice of the woman penetrated 
Marie's mind Tentatively, the woman took the gun 
from Marie's trembling hand 

Marie spent the next five days in a mental hospi- 
tal She remembered nothing Over the course of the 
next year. Mane began recalling - with the help of 
therapy what Harold had done to her 

Remembering such atrocities drove her over the 
edge She and Bill divore-ed later that same year. 
Mane's life spiraled downward She and her second 
hustiand t)egan to use drugs During this time, she 
became associated with the notonous motnn:y- ^ 
etc gang, the Hell's Angels, She transported ''^. v^ 
the chemicals used to make mclhampheta- -• ^ \ 
mines, receiving extraordinary sums of 
money. 

bventually, the Hell's Angel* . ,^ ^ 

gave her an ultimatum The mar- X>^ 
nage was taking time away from 
the "business" of running their 
drug operation The ultimatum; . „. 
divorce or be terminated - - liter- ' * 
ally Her second marriage was 
over 

Her spiral continued, as she 
sunk deeper and dcepei into the 
drug culture She continued to 
run the drug operation, and her 
life sank further into the mire of .,>' 

despair ' • ''' 

Eventually she left the Hell's 
Angels She moved to another 
state and fell in love with a man ^'_ ^^. ■' 
named Lenny. Lenny and Marie ".'•T'*'^ 
loved each other and drags - about ' ^ ' 
equally. 

One evening, they finally hit rock bot- 
tom 

During a heated argument, it became clear to 



Marie that Lenny was going to hit hw. Memoncs of 
her past flashed before her She grabbed a pair of scis- 
sors . 

As Mane sits before me now, she has foimd peace. 
After that awful night a few months ago, she and 
Lenny decided that they needed answers that neither 
ofthemhadTheywereonbottom sofardownihat 
they could nol even catch a glimpse of the top The 
anger had failed. 

fhc drugs had failed All else had failed. They 
finally gave up Mane sits before me as a testament to 
the horrors of child mok-station. drugs and violence 
But. above all this, what stands apart to me is what 
has become of Marie since that fateful night with 
Lenny She was baptized Sunday Her face glows with 
a radiance that docs not come from this M^irld 

Mane has become a living example of what the 
apo.stle Paul said in his second letter to Ihe 
Corinthians (5 17), "Therefore", if anyone is in Chnst. 
they are a new creation, the old has gone, the new has 
come" 

Marie sits before mc a truly new creation. 





Hale Library needs should 
be placed before football 

(editor. 

When I first heard the Department of 
Intercollegiate Athletics was making a 
rettuest for a referendum to raise our 
pnvilcgc fees to support funding for a 
stadium expansion, I was stunned I 
wondered how this could even he con- 
sidered, given the state of ftalc Library's 
re'sources. 1 don't believe our university 
could be more interested m a larger fool- 
ball stadium than a resourceful librar>' 

Then 1 realized it's not our entire uni- 
versity that had its pnonties messed up 
It was the athletic department exercising 
Its strong voice. Let's exercise our pow- 
erful vovces on Nov, 17 and Itt when we 
decide what our university's pnority 
really is 

Lisa Donaldson 
senior in social work 

ConnofoHon of nickname 
fttting of defense style 

Hditor, 

In the letter to the editor regarding 
our Wildcat defense's nickname. 
"Lynch Mob," there was a misconcep- 
tion regarding what a lynch mob is A 
lynch mob. histoncally and by defini- 
tion, is a group of people who, without 
due priKcss of law, assault and usually 
kill a pci^n by beating, hanging or 
burning 

The fury of the lynch mob has been 
evident throughout European and 
Amencan history, as cnminals. accused 
witches and even political figures were 
attacked and killed hy molts 

In our ov^n history, lynch mobs often 
took the low into their own hands to deal 
with accused horse thieves, murderers 
and child molesters 

Yes. there were many lynch ings of 
Afncan Amencans, particularly in the 
South But not all lynch mobs were 
groups of whites assaulting African 
Amencans 

Though the majority of racially moti- 
vated lynchings were directed at 
African- Americans, many other minori- 
ties also fell victim. To say that all lynch 
mobs were groups of wtiites hunting 
down Afrtcan-Amcncans is like saying 
that every car on the road is a lord 
Taurus Yes, there arc a lot of them, but 
you'd be overlooking fir too much with 



such a narrow statement 

Lynch mobs were not .i positive 
thing Bui, 1 do t>i.'lic\c the iiickiuiinc 
diws fit I he swarming style uf our 
defense, If the shoe fits, wear n 

JaNon Ruck CI 

senior in pre-veicnnary mc-dicine 

Former professor cared, 
showed dedication 

Ediloi. 

I am writing thi<> letter in response to 
the article that ran in Tuesday's paper 
concerning the suit filed a^i.iinsi the uni- 
versity by former assistant prol'es.vor All 
Kanso EI-(ihon 

first, I \^ant to say that this man was 
probably one of the best teachers I have 
ever had in my life 

Ite cared beyond v,\\a\ was expected 
of him. and it showed in dk' commit- 
ment he felt toward his slutknts. This 
professor wasn't tike most olliers. Mosi 
profes.sors don't take their entire clasv 
out for coffee, let alone pay for it out ol 
their own pockets 

Most students di>n't throw a birthday 
party for iIk'it professors. Most profes- 
sors don't slay around their offices until 
y am Most pritl'csstirs don't -.cck you 
out when you are at Wal-Mart just to sav 
hello ThtHc are just a fev* nf ihe things 
thai made f l-(ihon different 

Unfortunately, the university tfuit I 
Ime and support doesn't realin' the 
importance of people like i-l-(ihon 
There have been and there w ill be more 
teachers our university will let go 
because they arc d liferent 

1 remenilK'r a mo\ic in which ,i 
teacher wa.s fired because he was differ- 
ent Do you remember "Dead Pt»ets 
Society"' That is exactly the way tl- 
Ghort was We need professors whti 
wish to make a diflcrentc If that means 
being different, then s<v be it 

I have one of the professors whti was 
mentioned in Ihe article, and I will say 
that he IS a gMxt professor Maybe the 
reason these professors didn'i like 1:1- 
Ghon was because ihey didn't under 
stand him and never had hint in class. 

To really appreciate great teachers 
we must first understand then angle 
Please President Jon Wefald, di>n't lei 
the great profcsson get away f hey arc 
the ones who really care 

Ryan Crowell 

juniiH in mass communications 



WIDNISDAY, OCTOBIB 29, 1997 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Donor shortage leaves patients playing waiting game 



U3<n OUHfoni 

Dylan Spencer, senior in >iccnndary 
education and biology, has cxpcricnct'd 
firsthand how imfwirtant tirgun donors 
can be. 

In l**'*5. Spencer's faihcr. Richard 
Spencer, was on ihe wailing list lor a 
liver donation for a month before the 
o^n became available. When a family 
friend was involved in a fatal accident 
two weeks before thristmas. the 
Spencers received word that the liver 
Richard Spencer desperately needed was 
being designated to him by the family. 



Richard Spencer was transported 
frotn the hospital in Scott City, Kan., to 
Kansas City, where the transplant was 
performed. 

He was able lo return home on 
Chnstmas Vac 

"Hav ing my father home was the best 
present I ever received," Dylan Spencer 
said. 

As of this nH)nth, iheie are 55,530 
patients on the national waiting list for 
an organ transplant. Inery IS minutes a 
nev^ name is added lo the list, according 
to the United Network for Organ 
Sharing. 



UN OS is a private, nonpnifil. mem- 
bership corporation located in 
Richmond \'a Its mission is to provide 
organ transplants to patients with organ 
failure 

LINOS members include every trans- 
plant program, organ procurement orga- 
nization and tissue-typing laboratory in 
the United States 

Individuals on the transplant waiting 
list are registered with UNOS. which is 
available through a centralized L:omputei 
network linking all otgan pro^'urement 
organizations and transplant centers 
accessible 24 hours a day. seven days a 



week 

When an organ becomes available 

anywhere in the Uniicd States, ihe trans- 
plant center or organization accesses the 
UNOS computer, which provides a list 
of matches with closely related charac- 
teristics. 

Donors and recipients are matched 
by tissue, blood type, length of time on 
waiting list and immune status, for 
heart, heart -lung, liver, lung and p.in- 
creas transplants, the distance to the 
hospital where the organ awaits is also a 
consideration 

After receiving the wailing list, the 



transplant coordinator coniact.s a trans- 
plant team of surgeons and physicians 
tor Ihe selection o1 a patient Lab tests 
are necessary to measure compatibility 
between the donor and Ihe recipient 
This ensures the recipient's immune sys- 
tem won't reject the organs 

Patient selected must meet several 
criteria, 

They must be available, healthy 
enough to survive surgery, and willing to 
be transplanted immediately 

.After the testing, surgery is sched- 
uled and the transplant takes place 

Individuals might indicate their v^ish 



to be a donor by signing a Uniform 
Organ Donor Card, which can be 
requested when renewing a drivers 
license. 

Signing such a card doesn't ncecssar- 
ily grant permission todonaie lluspitat 
personnel still ask the ne.vi-id-kin loi 
permission. 

For this reason, it is vital that indi- 
viduals willing to donate to inform their 
relatives about their decision so that it 
can be honored. 

Information about the organ dona- 
tion process was provided through the 
Communications Department of UNOS 



Program gives K-State 
money for technology 



> Student fees increase, 

but state will compensate 
as part of program. 

K -State students might sec slightly 
higher student fees ne\l semester, but 
the slate will pay twice as much. 

In June, the Kansas Hoard of 
Regents approved a two- to-one I'ec pro- 
posal. Students at all regents schools 
would pay S I per credit hour In return, 
Ihe state would match the tec with S2 
per hour 

The money is pan of a lai;ger tech- 
nology enhancement program, sent to 
the governor's oH'ice and the 
Legislature on Sept 15, 

"Along with the library and faculty 
salaries, cifuipmeni is the third leg of 
the university's majof needs," j'nwost 
James Cotlman said 

The estimated S.VN million per year 
will fund classroom technology 
enhancements. This can range from 
multimedia to chemistry labs, said Kay 
llaukc, regents director of planning and 
budget. 

The gtwernor is review ing the inilia- 
tive. 

The regents w ill have an opportuni- 
ty to Slate their support of the program 
in mid-Novcmber 

If Gov Bill Graves supports the ini- 
tiative, he will recommend that the 
Legislature approve tbc request next 
year 

The governor will formally state his 
views in a Januan' address of the 



Legislature. 

"If the governor pushes Tor it. then 
\\c\c got a lot belter chance of getting 
It than it the governor dtwsn't push for 
it," said Student Body President Tim 
Riemann 

The Student Advisory Committee to 
the regents, which is compt^sed of the 
SIX student Kidy presidents of regents 
schools, has endorsed the plan. 
Ricmann said 

If the initiative passes the House of 
Representatives and Senate, funding 
will siari dunng the fall semester 

"The state component would 
become available July I . assuming they 
apprtwed it." llaukc said. 

The student portion would become 
available after lees were paid 

llaukc said the Kurd cvpects the 
go^crnor lo support the fee program 

"He was supportive of our equip- 
ment initiative last year." Hauke said 

K-Slatc would see more than SI 4 
million for the mam campus and K- 
State-Salina each year Ihe t ollege or 
Veterinary Medicine would receive 
about S4X,()tllt. 

As of last year. K-Statc's total 
equipment needs were SS4 million. 
ColTman said 

Hauke said certain areas are targets 
for immediate upgrades. These include 
computers lor student and faculty use. 
lab cquipmeni for the sciences, and bet- 
ter audio and visual equipment for 
classrooms 

"It would do a lot for K-Statc 
because whatever money K-State puts 
into It v^ul4 be earmarked for K- 
Sute," Rlemann said, "It's a good thing 
alfaround," 






nBO 



ScM & ;^' 



ixm 



The women of nB(l> 

can't wait' 



Tlic men of Alpha Tau Omei^a are really 
looking torward to their 

Halloween f^nctjon 

/ with the beautiful ladies of / 

Gtinima Phi Beta tomtriorrowi 



Treat yourself to a Change of Scenery 



We are seeking un ambitious, Niicct's.s-driven SALES 
REPRESENTIVE to help maintain our leadership poition. 
Both full time and part time available. 

You will be involved in developing new ciiBl()mer accuunta 
and many "mil up your sleeves" activities, including measuring 
and analyzing landscapes, and conducting telephone follow up. 
You will also BHsirtl in handling custome inquiries. 



TO QUALIFY: * 21 yean or older 'DeiwrutatHe, with ttrong 
work ethic ' Effective communication skills 

• AtHUty to work Independentty * Valid, violation free 
driver's Ikteme with less than 3 violations In last 3 yean 

• Pependable vehicle * Eventngs. Saturday mandltory 

• Able to pass drug test > Telemarketing experience a plus 

' Play an Important role In our acceferatirig sales effort 

and you will be rewarded with a . . . 

• Bate utary/commltslon/overtime with potential 
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For connideriilmn, please send retumc to : 

ATTN: Nick at 

TRUGREEN— CHEMLAWN 

411 5 S.W. Southgate Dr./lopeka, KS 66609 



Festival uses games, prizes 
in hopes of raising awareness 



TONYA MUHMT 

.[.ill rr^Ktfi 

One uul of nine women uill be 
Jiagnused with breast eanecr. Linda 
Wert/bcrger, lieensed praelieal nurse 
at the Women's Clime, told a student 
at l.afene Health Center's leslival of 
Health in the K- State .Student I'nion 
on Tuesday 

"Are you doing self examinations 
every month?" she asked 

Wert/berger, committee chair- 
woman of the festival, said it is 
important for students to learn about 
health education and about the vari- 
ous serv lees l.afene has l« nlVer 

Hach department at Lafene had its 
own booths with pri/es, games and 
informational handouts There was a 
duck pond and Wheel of lorlunc 

The women's clime tested stu- 
dents on their knowledge of sexually 
trattsmitled diseases and gave out 
mugs and breast self-examination 
kits. 

Amanda Sayler, freshman in child 
development and social work, said 
she had fun and learned a lot from 
the festival. 



"It's interesting," Sayler said 
"There's lots of pri/es, lots of facts to 
learn about health awareness, STDs 
and stulT like that " She also won a 
compact disc from KSDIM M VI.V 
lor naming a department at 1 afcne 

The nursing stalT jjavc free blood 
pressure tests, and flu shots were 
otTered ai Sfi lor students and S 1 1( for 
faculty and sialT 

"I didn't knoM they gave llu shots 
at I afcne." Corey Dunn, freshman in 
dieieiics. said. 

Although the festival was aimed 
at informing the students. 
Wert/bcrgcr said it was important 
that everyone was having I'un 

"It's neat to he able lo have fun 
with the kids an4io see them at a less 
serious level than when they come 
into Lafcne." she said 

"We also enjoy seeing the faces 
that we haven't seen come through 
l.afene yet." 

Hob Mortimer, physical therapist, 
said he had a lot of students sign up 
tor a drawing for an air east 

"It looks like everybody's having 
fun," he said, 



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^(?'l> C^-— Men's Shirts (selected styles) 

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K8U THKATRK ft THK ZHWHOtTMWKT OF MUSIC 



•V 



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OF 

La Mancha 

Written by Dah. Wasserman 
Music bv Mitch Leigh 
Lyrics by Joe darion 

Tickets: 

McCain Box Office 

NooN-6 OQ PM OR 

Call 532-6428 

PRirrs. $8 STUDCNIS/SFNtORS 
SI I CiNtWAL PUBl IC 

November 6-8 

McCain auditorium 8 OO pm 




SUNMIMUS 



KANSAS S TATE COl LE Gt A N 




WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1997 



Journalist ponders 
her post-graduation 
journalism career 

T*minus 45 days, an iflV Spanish final and 
LOunlini; 

My D-Day, ur actually, my G-Day. is Dec 1.1 
Have I siancd Imikinj; for a job? Nol hardly Have 
1 opened my Spanish b<x>ii ihis semester? Not 
nearly enough 

Everyone asks. "So, wiicrc are you looking for 
johs?" 

Well, that's easy Anywhere thai has imports and 
needs J sptiris wriler or siports TV reporter lo cover 
them 

I don 'I care l( could be North Dakota at this 
poini I hear the University of North Dakota vs 
Mintiesoia is a hockey battle to be witnessed, so il 
might nol be all that bad. Just cold 

Siixce I'm from K.f.. people then ask, "Do you 
warn to stay m Kansas City''" 

Well, I hat's a tough one as well. If one of our 
eslecmed nnrdia oullcis came uul and said il could- 
n't live another day 
wilhoul me as it.s 
Chiefs beat rcpi»rter. I 
would live there for- 
ever 

That is not going to 
happen, no I thought 
I'd look at the top- 
ftvc places that would 
best serve a strug- 
gling sports journal* 




SUN DEE 

MILLS 



SUN SB MliS II a www « isi like myself 
•<»ciFO".c i«""oi-im Voucanimd | California: What 

m I- A., you vc goi 
the (lodgers. 1 akcrs. Clipperi and Kings (I'm talk- 
ing hockey here) {'otiegc sports aht)und here, twi 
Sports lllustralL'd named UCLA the best jock 
schiH)) in I he nation, and USC usually has some- 
thing 10 brag ab<»ul. And the WNBA brought the 
Sparks lo town last summer 

Juvl half an hour soulh I depending on the 
Southern California traffic! in Anaheim, you'll 
find Mickey Mouse, ihe Mighty Ducks and the 
Angels, courtesy of Disney C'H) Michael i isner 

(jo a little further south, where the Padres and 
Chargers can be found, and you could pick up 
some bargains in San Diego's border town Tijuana 
as well. 

If you knim the way to San iosie, you can catch 
iiuire hihckcy action with the Sharks. Folhm the 
r»Kid turlher mirth and you'll cross Tiger Woods' 
old school, Stanford 

Wilhtn about* a two-hour radius is another sat- 
urated sports suc In and around San Francisco, 
you've got ihe '4*>cts and (iianls. living in the 
town I ha I hoa.sis the fisherman's Wharf sour- 
dough bread and rare snowfall would he all right 
with me 

1 rossing I ha I big bridge will get you lo 
Oakland The Athletics and Raiders arc nou in 
Oakland, al least for today ( Reporting with objec- 
tivity is so important, and since I do noi care al all 
about the Raiders, that beat would be a bree/e I 
Check oui Herkclcy a.s you cniise further northeast 
to Sacramento, Here you'll find the WNBA's 
Monarchs and former Wildcat player Milch 
Richmond and the Kings 

(ice. my mouth is watering. Even if I can't find 
a job here, I ihink I'll lake a road trip. 

2 Klonda: Along the same lines as California, 
htn w iihin a smaller area Starring in Tallahassee, 
you can visit with Coach ilnhby Uowdcn and the 
Florida State Seminolcs. Two hours south, you'll 
hit e^-Cat coach Hob Sloops' new home in 
(tainesville al the swamp in Florida Orlando has 
Ihe Magic (and I'm not talking Kingdom), but no 
Shaq. 

further south, you'll discover Tampa is coming 
inio Its own as a sports city Wiih ihe Huts, the 
I ighlnmg and the new Devil Rays, the only thing 
this town IS missing is an NHA team f)ul that can 
be found in Miami with the Heat, as well as (he 
{Xdphins. the Panthers. Murncanes and the world- 
champion flofida Marlins (it really pains me to 
write (hat \ 

y Atlanta IXin'l flame me - this is a person- 
al choice I have family Ihcrc and have been watch- 
ing Ihe Braves for as long as I can remember 
Objecliviiy would tly out the window, because I 
have folltFwed the Hawks' Christian Laeltner since 
his days as a Ulue Devil and would chcnsh (he 
chance lo cover Lenny Wilkens' team I even have 
a soft spot for the hapless Falcons The ABL's 
(ilory and the so<in-io-be NHL Thrashers complete 
the professional scene College action in the ACC 
and the SEiC' thrives with (ieorgia Tech downtown 
and the Universiiy oft ieorgia an hour away. 

4 Chicago: The only drawback in the Windy 
City IS Ihe weather I hate Ihe cold, which is 
probably I he biggest reason Chi Town's nol No I 
The traditions of the Bulls, the Bears, the Sox, ihc 
Cubs and (he Black hawks nuke up for the <y«ih- 
er Norihwestcrn, Noire Dame and the lllloi pro- 
vide a local college fix. 

5 Texas: Other than ihe lowboys cxisring in 
(his state (I'd be such an ohjcelivc reporter for 
(hem I. the Lone SUit Stale is a perfect sports 
locale There's something for everyone three 
NBA learns, two baseball fmnehisex. hockey, the 
WNBA, praclically year-round golf four Big 12 
Kchools and a huge high school ftxjtball tnuiition 
— equaling a plethora of opportunities. 

Other towns have been excludc-d simply for 
space reasons, but would include Denver; New 
Yini: Washington, DC and Seattle 

An h<inorab!e mention goes lo Pittsburgh: With 
(he Steel ers. the Pirates and (he Penguins, you'd 
only have to buy one T-shirt All dvce teams sport 
the same colors, which saves the fans money, but il 
isn't the smartest marketing strategy I've h«ard of 

So, if anyone oui there bears tt:^t one of these 
towns is desperate for a sports reporter, drop me s 
Ime And if you sec Lenny and Christian, tell Ihcm 
I said hi 




OFFBESH 

A I R 



This is such a big university, 
and I cherish everything that 
happens to me here. 

• wide receiver Gavin Pcrics 







K-STATE WIDE 
RECEIVER GAVIN 

PEftlES cakhei o 
39 yofd posi dutitig 
ihe K Stole «i Ohio 
game on Sepi 1 3 al 
KSU Slodium Pefies 
had two cotcKes fo( a 
'otal of 7] yaidi 



Peries finds success on field despite medical problem 



4 Iter going through grueling Iwo-a- 
days and months of practices, 
mosi of K-Slalc*s wide receivers 
are conditioned well enough lo 
run their routes ilownficld and 
easily come back at full speed ihe 
next play 
Bui Ciavin Peries can'l do that 
Make him run 2U yards at full speed and 
he's taking deep breaths I Ic can make it through 
an offensive H'rtes, but he'll definitely be tired 
when It's over 

But that's nol because he's out ol shape 
Nor diKs he sullcr frcMii game-day hang- 
overs 

And he sure doesn't smoke 
Penes ha tiles lor breath every lime he runs 
downfield because ol his asthma 

However, judging by his numbers, he's win- 
ning the battle He is K-State's leading receiver 
with 10 ca(ches He leads Ihe (cam in receiving 
yardage and yardage per game and has (he high- 
est yardage-per-caich average of all the 
Wildcats' regular receivers 

Still, it hasn't always been easy Penes trans- 
ferred to K -Slate from Pasadena t ily ( ollege, 
Calif, which IS aKml M\ minutes cast of Los 



Angeles. He thought the lack of smug in Kansas 
would help him. bui the Midwest hent brouglit 
allergies, which made his asthma wtirsc than ii 
was in California 

"The hardest ad|ustment for me was when I 
came here," he said "For the first ttiiK tn my 
life. I felt like it was gonna beat mc I never gave 
up before, but I kntiw a couple of times al prac- 
tice I stopped I fch like ii beat mc II was ihe 
hardest thing lor mc to adju.st to Ntw I think 1 
have It under control I have better medication 
It's not much of a factor any more" 

Pcrics uses his inhalers 1 2 times a day and 
isn't too worried about having an aslhma attack 
on the fmiiball Held Trainers and ci>aches hold 
his rttedicaluiii for him on the sidelines m case 
he bus a problem, but ihal hasn't been the case 
yei 

His new medications, designed to prevent 
asthma attacks, have worked so far He still has 
a problem with shortness of breath, but he's not 
worried 

"Being out of breath doesn't mean you're 
having an asthma attack," he said "It just means 
you're struggling to hrcalhe It doesn't require 
you to use your inhaler It's just pan nl hav ing 
asthma" 

S?0«y BY SAM FElSENfElD 



Although l\ries is getting ujicd to i), he still 
has to be carcflil. 

"N'ou'rc struggling lo get each breath," he 
satd "f veryonc else can nm around forever .ind 
hv line, hul I can run 20 vatds and be out of 
breath A lot ol dmcs. ii dcpcmlsoti if ii's a real 
hoi day, I struggle more But now ihal it's cihiI- 
ing diwn. it's a little easier" 

I his year, he's happy with the jinval of (all 
Bui last year, when he v*as trcsh duI of Southern 
California, he didn't take Iihi kindlv lo the drop 
in temperature 

A cold dav in Pasadena is fi(t degrees, hut 
here he learned thai ice is more than soincihing 
to put in a glass nt soda 

"I remember walking lo class thinking I was- 
n't gonna make*il." Ite said "il was tough, hul 
like anything, you just get used to it " 

Coming (0 play lot the ( ats wasn't Mtmc- 
(hing Pcrics always ihoughi .ibout Actually, it 
wasn't something he ever Ihoughi ,ihoui He 
admits thai when it came lime to decide what 
university to trarisler to. he hadn't ever heard ol 
K-Staic ' 

But his recruiting adventure was a little dil- 
ferent than most CihiiKiII players who end up 
playing lot a top- 1 5 program 

PHOTO BY IVAN KOZAR 



Most player* receive letters and phone calls 
from emacfies irying lO sell iheir pi og rums 
However. 1 'cries incil to sell himscll to more 
ilian t()progr.ims bv sending in highlight lilms. 
iiewsp.iper clippings and bv makine phone 
calls 

He heard Irom a handlul ol schools, includ- 
ing K-State. Kent State, Vri/ona State. Oregon 
Slate and Colorado Slate While ihev consid- 
ered him, he made sure lo be fair and let them 
know he had asilmia I Ic sard the coaches were 
lair artd g,ive him a chance 

K-Stiilc coach Bill Snyder w.is one of those 
coaches. ,iml he wasn't worried about IVrics 
being able to play for the Cats 

"I I we Ihoughi It was going to impair his 
ability to play here, we would have given it a 
second thought," Smdet said, "Bui that wasn't 
the CISC Based <in past experiences, out guys 
have handled themselves line and been able to 
play " 

After redshirtmg last year. Penes (s finally 
getting his chance to play this year /\nd so far. 
lie's made the most ot his i>pportumlics ,'Mong 
wilh being K-Slale's leading receiver he's had 

Se« KRIES, Page 12 




Sun Dfr 

Mills 



rfeiGHT 

Night 

Fright Ntghl wull be h»ld at 
B|p,m 'Bli/Hdoy of Btomlgga 
doliieum Th« doort will ' 
OM^oi 6:9&p)«n "Evcnn 
thdQligbl will iriclud« tha 
yioMng ' - 
'SpwWguetl will ba 
ESPN/AaC college 
btuWHllonelyslDlck 
Wlale ' '^- 

•Irkk-or-Trtoling and ' 
rabw«wmU'iMi for iidi 
amogt* anf«fiKiinlagt 
Coljstt^ ooncouMri 
■TWlHll 1,000 bm will 
racieve o commemorativt 
T-»hirt _ 
*fW^Wiati will .^ 
scrimffloge during ih« i 

ilrM ^ r , . 

lifortfi*{)i'ek VitoU 
kf,Conl^t will 
fdufing Ih* wwiing. 



MWI fNMlHAMIT/CdIigmn 



Wildctts ram aeademie hnnors 

The K-State cross country team placed 
vevcn members on the Hig \2 t onferenee All- 
Acudcmic Team All seven wctc first-team 
selections 

Sophomores Kellv Andra, Lmily Dicdench, 
and Michael Thomas, juniors Alison Canny and 
t indsay Moser; and seniors Anita Hallauer and 
Ashlie Kinton earned first-team honors. 

Dicdench was one of 10 sluderU athletes 
nominated with a 4 t) grade pt>int average 

Student athletes with a 3 2 <iPA ur better are 
considered t irst ieam Anyone else above a Mi 
received honorable mention 

K-Slate wraps up its schedule with the Big 
12 Championships on Saturday in Stillwater. 
Okia ITic (ats will he out to improve on ihctr 
IWh finishes, whc-n the men's team wound up 
sisth and the women's team placed seventh in 
Ihe 1 2-tcam competition. 

Fooiball learn on television 

Saturday's K-Staie ImHball game vs Tesas 
Tocb will start al I I.^U am and will be tele- 
vised on live Big 1 2 syndicated package, which 
can be seen on WIBW-M (Ttl Ch \} in 
Manhattan The kick-olf litne has changed from 
Ihe onginal I p m time on the schedule. 

The NiTv N honw game vs Kansas will not 
be televised and will start .it I 1 p.m. as .sched- 
uled No iiekcis ncmain lor either the KLi game 
or the Nov. IS hotae finale vs. Colorado 

Coiifrnncr packing itadlumi nationwtdc 

After lasi week's mid-season rcpon on Big 
12 fiHilball home attendance totals, an t>et, 25 
push of vis contests has edged IW7 lurnouls 
past the I'Wh figures (including (he Dr Pepper 
Big 12 Championship (iame) 

As a wWle, Big 12 teams have averaged 
51.BK fans through (k't 18 home outings, as 
opposed lo the conference, which altrsctcd an 



average 51.Kbb fans per game (with the title 
game included I for an increase of 2,X percent 
overall Stv Big 12 battles drew an average of 
44,^21 tans lust week, despite lonudocs 
Saturday on the ()klahoma-Te.\8s border and 
approaching October snowstorms in Northern 
areas, 

\'ol ley hall team receives votes 

( oming o'tl Us U\ ( Ls-fi, 15-2, I.V2 1 drub- 
bing of ihen-No 12 lesas A&M in Manhattan 
and a strong performance in a .^-tJ loss against 
No. 4 fexas. who is IfM) in Big 12 pl.iy, K -Stale 
received 17 votes m fiicsdav's LSA 
Today AVCA ptill. This leaves the Cats No 29 
in the nation 

lour Big 12 teams arc in the poll: No. V 
lesas. No II Nebraska. No, 15 Tcsas A&M 
and No. 2i Colorado 

Tesas Tc>eh and Oklahoma also received 
voles 

Cai volle)ball lu play on llallnwrrn 

The Cats will travel to Lubbock to tackle 
Texas Tech on Friday, marking the 1 1 ih iime the 
Cats will play on llaUoween night 

K-Stale is ^-5 on Halloween and has won 
three of the last loui games played on 
Halloween 

The Halloween game lived up to especla- 
lions in IW7, as UMKC was torced to forfeit 
when had weather prevented the team from 
inveling to Manhattan 

Ctvm'i race canreli-d 

The K- Slate women's rowing team got an 
unexpected week otTwhen the Head of the Iowa 
regatta, scheduled lor (kl 25 and 2t\. was can- 
celed because ot had weather It will nol K' 
reschedulcnl. 

The Cats relurn home lot the traihtional 
Class Day Regatta on Saturday at lutlle Creek 



Reservoir Members of each of the four classes 
will race against one another in an intrasquad 
competition 

While team takes series 

The \\ hue Squad won (he |W7 mtrastiuod 
K-Slate Fall World Series, live games lo two 
following learn tradition, the losing Purple 
squad will serve a meal to the victorious While 
team Ihc series concluded tail practice loi the 
team 

Purple's I ric Sommerhausci was the top 
ollensivc perl'onncr for either side, hitting 474 
with one home run and three RBIs White's 
Scoll ViKis hit a team-best 412 while stealing 
four bases 

Purple's fom Iknishaw was one of the top 
pitchers, pttsiing a d 75 IRA. which was high- 
lighted by a six-hit complete game in game six 
Pal Hert/el led Ihe While team with a I- 1 
record .ind a .1 (til IRA 

W and Kt win mcmarial tournament 

Ihe Oklahoma and Kansas men's weccr 
teams were awarded (oim firsi-placc positions 
Sunday in the KSC Fd Chartrand Memorial 
Soccer Toumament The lie was a result ol" the 
thrcv-day loumumcni being slktrtened becau.se 
of heav y rams SumLiv 

ti was the l'>th playing of Ihe Chartiand 
tournament fhe tournanietn is namcti a Her 
Id ward I t hartrand. a fortner I cawotnl. Kan , 
resident who played for the K- Stale soccer 
team He died in May W'i at Ihe age of 22 

,'\nd> Heard, a senior Irom Wichita who 
plays on the K-Slale team, was announced as 
the l'>''7 recipient of the fd ChurtranJ 
Mcnioiial Soecei Scholarship 

I he S5IKI scholarship is presented each year 
to a K-State stKcer player and is funded by pn- 
vale donations as well us donations by the 
Chartrand fainilv 



i 



WtPNiSOAY, OCTOaiK 29, 199T 



KANSAS STATI COLUQIAN 



// s called the Dev Nelson Press Box and is usually reserved for the media; 

however, on game days, this building houses 

MORE THAN MEDIA 




K-STATE FANS cheer on the 

Wddcol football teom m the club $eotiog 

area of the Dev Nelson Preji Box Club 

seattng hou»ei 126 people 

<'ICr ItUTH ANN WEFAID 

talks during the K-Stole vi. Texos A&M 

gome The Wefaldi luxury box is on the 

Mcond level of ttve Dev Nelion Press 6ox. 



STORY BY TRAVIS D. LENKNER 
PHOTOS BY CLIF PALMBERG 




Ttic Do' Nelson Press Box. 
Constructed iti I W3 at a 
cosi of S3. 3 million, the builtl- 
itig IS named lor longtime K- 
Statc sp*>rt.seaslcr and <iuppt»rt- 
ci Dev Nelson. 

But calling ll a press box hardly docs jus- 
tice to the building, which hoitsxs, 126 luxury 
seats and 22 luxury suites. 

Though it seals UK) members of the press 
aiid houses radio and television crews, most 
of the press bon is composed of premium 
scaling for athletic donors 

Bub L'avello. business man' 
ager for the (XTjartmeni of 
Inlercollegiate Athletics, said 
the bm is a good source of 
revenue for the depart- 
ment. 

This docs help us 
raise money to provide 
athletic opportunities for 
student athletes." he said. 
"The money that comes 
from the box has a great 
deal to do with the health 
of our athletic programs " 

The cost for an individual 
luxury seat when the box was 
built was a SSIMI one-time 
charge, plus S5tm per year and the 
iosi ()( regular season tickets These 
scats ate referred to as club scats and are in 
rooms on each crBJ of the building s second 
level 

Now, Cavcllo said, those prices arc under 
rev lew and have yet to be determined for new 
scat holders The waiting list for luxury seats 
numbers 4 1 . 

Luxury boxes, which house 24 fans, cost 
aKtut SHKMMK) for a five-year contract when 
the hoKcs were built, suite owners said 

l>onna Vanier, wife of Jack Vanicr, the 
namesake of the Vanier Ftxttball Compkx, 
said her family's luxury suite has been worth 
It 

"When it rains or snows its really nice 
( Kerall. though, it's just fun having a place to 
entertain." she said. 

Box -holders can decorate their Kixes with 
personal belongings and K-State memorabil- 
ia. Vanier said Others furnish their boxes in 
other ways. A refrigerator, wet bar and 
catered fiwd arc prov ided. 

fbiise with club seats said they also enjoy 
tbe atmospbcrc in the box on game days 
Rows of 63 seats compose the club seating 
boxes, with catered butTets and television 
monitors adding to the rtwm 



"It offers protection from the weather, the 
view is great and the air conditioning isn't 
bad either," said Bob Pulford, a Manhattan 
resident and K-Staic alumnus "We do miss 
the crowd noise and excitement a little bit, 
but not enough to change our mind." 

Pulford said he and his wife, like others in 
the press box, ate longtime university sup- 
poftefs. 

"We've had these scats ever since the 

press box opened." Pulford said. "We're both 

graduates nf Kansas State, and we've 

been watching K-State football 

since the early 1 ">5()s. This is hog 

heaven" 

For many with club scuts, 

the draw to the press box is 

its comfortable seating 

and luxury atmosphere 

For those with luxury 

Itoxcs, however, business 

is also a lar).>c part of 

game -day activities. 

Brent Rockers. 

a representative for 

Novartis Crop Protection 

in Lincoln. Neb., said his 

company uses its luxury box 

to entertain Kansas customers 

"This has been good for 

us," Rockers said. "It allows you to 

bring some of your key customers up 

and he able to entertain I hem and get to know 

them better" 

Business discussion doesn't end with cor- 
porations. University business is also a hot 
topic in the boxes, especially the President's 
Suite The suite, which is larger than normal 
luxury boxes, has been host to numerous dis- 
tinguished guests as well as the family of 
President Jon We fa Id on game day. 

Wel'ald said the press box is a good public 
relations loo] for the university 

'It's just a great facilitator for meeting 

See MitMA, Page 10 



This IS 

hog 
heaven? ' 



Bob Pulford, 

Monhatton 

residenf and 

K-Sfote 

alumnus 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOtiB 29, 19^7 



NIKOUI 
KHRAMTSOV, 

TBieofch oijijfarvt in 
biology, cotli ^njig 
into the woter at 
Rocky Ford Fishing 
Area Tuesday after- 
noon Wofloye, 
wiper and while 
boss ore ipecies 
conirrionly (lihed for 
ol Rocky Ford 

xncooM* 

CoHagHV 




Defense attorney confident in British au pair murder trial 

ASSOCMno Piiss "Make no misiukv lihttui it." he tuld children, while ihc dcrcnM; otpcrtv did only uf mjinslajghitT, dcrincd as a rtt 

tht' iiir^. "this IS ^ i.-:iNL' itl' L-hil(l ahusL' " m>t havo (l3v<to-dav. hiiDds-or^ citncricncL- less uciiim (hat shous disreitard I 



CAMBRIIXiR. Mass, A tontidcnl 
defense altomey told Hirers Tuesd^v that 
pmsecutors did not even femitlel> prme 
that a Uriti.sh au pair talallv shook or 
slammed (he head ol an ^-numth-old 
infant in her can;. 

In closing argument»> at Lduisc 
Woodward's murder irial. prosecutor 
(ierard Lcune Jr charaelen/ed the 
defense as a theatric (froduction, 
Wootlwanl as an actress and some i)f the 
defense expert witnesses as mtellectuull) 
arrogant. 

Woodward. 1 4, is charged wiih killing 
Mallhcu' l.appen, out of frustraimn over 
the child's tiisMing and the demands of tier 
job. 

But her attorney, Barry Seheck s;iid, 
"Did thai happen' Have they prmen thai 
lu you beyond a reasonable doubt ! lis nut 
even close." 

Leone told jurors the babv s injuries 
could have been cau^d by no one other 
than the teen-age au pair. 



"Make no mistake about it." he told 
the jury, "this is a case of child abuse 

It was not just coincidence The baby 
tell into a coma on a day Winxiward told 
police she Mas rough v^ith the infant, he 
said. 

Earlier. Seheck blasted l)r Kli 
Newberger, head of the child protection 
unit al Children's Hospital in Boston, for 
making a snap judgment ih.)i the baby 
was abused 

Newherger and other doctors at the 
hospital abandoned careful, critical, 
itbjeclive and scientific s<.rutiny of the 
tacts. Seheck said. 

Seheck focused tin the medical evi- 
dence he said ms the basis of his client's 
defense, contending the baby's brain did 
not show signs i>f a sudden traun^atlc 
brain injury on Feb 4. the day he was 
rushed to tk- emergency room The injury 
was us much as 3 weeks old Scheek said, 
citing expert witnesses called by (he 
defense, 

Leone said the prosecution witnesses 
vwre doctors who regularly worked with 



children, while the defense enperts did 

not have day-to-day, hands-on experience 

Seheck, who handled the medical side 
of the O.J, Simpson defense, shtwk the 
lectern and used his hands lo simulate the 
shaking and slantmmg prosecutors said 
happened when Wtxxlward was left alone 
with the child, 

"We may never knou the full answer 
lo exactly how this incident occurred But 
the issue in this case, and the only issue m 
this case, is Keb 4." Seheck said "We 
have prwcn to you mcrwhelimngly that it 
was an old injury." 

Co- defense counsel Andrew (iood 
called WixHJward a child lover who had 
the mislbriune of being w ith Matthew the 
day the baby was re- injured 

"She's going to go home She's going 
to go back to school. And if you do your 
job. someday she'll get married and she'll 
be somebody's mother. And she'll be a 
wonderful mother," he said 

Superior Court Judge Hiller Zobel's 
ruling means jurors would have to act^uit 
Woodward If they believe she is guilty 



only of manslaughter, defined as a reck- 
less action that s;hows disregard for 

human life 

A jiuilly verdict on the most H'nous 
chaige uould mean she vkuuld spend the 
rest ol her life in an ,\merican priMtn. she 
would become eligible for parole in 15 
vears if convicted of second -degree mur- 
der 

Woodward spent Ivtti days on the stand 
denyins! chargos she ever sbm^k or hit 
Matthev\ She calmly defended herself 
Monday as 1 c-onc questioned her abiiut 
late hours and oilier behavior thai prompt- 
ed the Fiappens lo give her an ultimatum 
lo shape up 

Leone's cross-eitammation revealed a 
young woman who chatted on the phone. 
went out w ith her friends and lied about 
her age to get into bars 

The trial has brought criticism of the 
Lappens, who are both doctors. 

Callers lo Boston radio talk shows 
accused them of puiimg their careers 
ahead of their children by hinng inexpen- 
sive child care. 




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Kansans gets 2nd look 
at historical treasures 



(MiRLAND PARK. Kan For the 

second time m two years, Russia plans to 
sho\v its historical treasurer in Kansas 

Russian oflicials announced 
Overland Park will be a site for the 
"Great limperors: Alexander 1 and 
Napoleon I" exhibition, a collection of 
I '^(h-ecniury artifacts that organizers say 
have never been seen outside Russia. 

"We're Itwking at Wm of the greatest 
emperors ever, their lives and hot» ihey 
.1 till. ted t-.urope," said Betty Simecka. 
prcMtknt of Pinnacle Productions, which 
will produce and market the exhibition. 

Irina Rodimiseva. director of Slate 
Kremlin Museums, and Vadim Egorov. 
deputy general director of Ihe State 
Historical Museum for Scientific Work 
in Russia, announced the site selection 
Munday 

A final deal, however, has not been 
completed Organ i/ers are expected lo 
go to Moscow next month to work out 
the agreement 

A dale for the exhibit has not been 
set. but orgain/ers hope to put the arti- 
facts on display next fall The loeaiion 
has not been decided 

fhe display proptised for Overland 
Park IS similar to the "Treasures of the 
tVars" exhibit in Topeka two years ago 



Thai showing drew a half-million visi- 
tors in five months and was worth an 
cstimaied S3 1 million to the local econo- 
my 

The Overland Park display, which 
organi/ers hope will attract as many as 1 
million people, is expected to have five 
times aii many artifacts and will empha- 
size the period's military history. 

For example, Simeclta said oi^aniz- 
ers were trying to bring Napoleon's 
sleigh and field kitchen to Overland 
Park. They arc among the many artifacts 
Napoleon left behind as his troops 
retreated from Russia. 

Key issues to be resolved at next 
month's meeting include a site for the 
exhibition and the length of its stay and 
costs. Organizers hope to keep the exhi- 
bition in (Overland Park for six or seven 
months, Simecka said. 

It cost an estimated S5 million to % 
million to organi/e "Treasures of the 
C/ars ' in Topeka. fVterscn said 

It's unclear whether the exhibit will 
tour other cities. 

Rodimiseva said she wa.s optimimic a 
deal would be w^irked out. 

"We came here to start the negotia- 
tions, but because both parties treated 
each other very well and base a welUdis- 
p4ised attitude iiw^ard each other. D think 
Ibis exhibit will take place," she said. 







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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




WEDNESDAY 



OCTOBER 2 9 



19 9 7 



DAILYcrossworcf 



ACROSS 37 Smm pistol DOWN 



1 Land: abbr. 38 0ne 



5 Peninsu- 
lar St. 

8 Lets the 
tears (low 

12 'Dori'l 
have—, 
man!" (B. 
Simpson) 

13 Author 
Delghton 

14 Duel toot 

15 Omar's 
Opus 

17 Oennts 
Miller 
specialty 

18 Gun lobby 

19 Shoe 
seller's 
dream 
customer 

21 Shackles 

24 Area unit: 
abbt 

25 Vicinity 

26 Numbers 
game' 

30 Sleep- 
stage 
initials 

31 Make into 
confetti 

32 "Holy 
mackeretl" 

33 Coop 
group 

as Frost 
30 Compas- 
sion 



Clampett 

41 "Great 
Expecta- 
tions" hero 

42 Jai - 

43 Squabbles 
on the 
diamoncl 

48 Rhelt's 
parting 
word 

49 There's a 
small 

charge lor 
It 

50 'Driving 
Miss 
Daisy" 
playwright 

51 Errxwe 
TrebeK 

52 Coqueflish 20 Temper 

53 Banlf deal ate 



1 Pitch 

2 0kj 
French 
coin 

3 Plagiarize 

4 Neighbor 
of Burundi 

S'Go- 
krter 

6 Actress 
Salonga 

7 They're 
nothing 
new 

8 Tranquil 

5 October 
stone 

10 Curve 

11 —good 
example 

16 Apr. 
addressee 



1 


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38 Actress 
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39 Israeli 
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40 Docile 

41 Hardly 
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CTI IUDCR9 ^°' ariswerslo today's crossword, cM 
vlwinrClll )-90(MS4-««73 1 99ep«r minute. tOUCh- 
lorie / rotary ptiones (16* only ) A King FwUiras service. NYC. 



10-21 CRVnOQUIP 

D B W I Z D M H MFQG-IBN HCU 



B a 



FQICWGVBWG 



[ B N F 



ZW DZNFU-1NBFV ICWGZUZCW. 
Yesterday's Cryptoqulp; WHAT WIU TERMITES 
UKt BEST FOR THEIR BREAKFAST? OAKMEAL. 

Today's Ctyptoqulp clue: 1 equals C 




Former K-State student designs 
signs for Aggieville merchants 



Lucky 's Brewgrille, Gamer signs created by 
Goodman, graphic designer for hire 

Lesley Baker • staff reporter 



^^1 raphk dcsignas arc vinuul plumbers. 

At Iciisi ihcv arc in iht opinion of Craig 
( itHHJmun, u graph I L* dcsignLT at JS Sign and Design in 
Manhattan 

He's rcNponsihk- for much of the art around 
AggicMllc. such as the hack Luckys Brc»(inlk sign, 
jhc ( )kii>Krfi'M posicrs, ihe new tiamcr sign anJ the 
Po^^crcat fiHilKall posler> 

"Doiii!; ihc K-Slalc slullTias hccn the most rewurJ- 
iDL'.' (iiMidntati said "Driving into Kansas lily, pas^iing 
.1 hitlbtun] jod ?»e(:ing your logo lO-fecl-high- mm 
tlwi's rcttjriling " 

( ItHHlmaii has hecn a graphic designer for three 
\ears. hut he's nc\cr been really trained lor the job. He 
anenJeJ K-Siaic in I'JKK as a drawing major and 
became intercsied in conipiiier an lie left and eamc 
hack m \*i^2 as a sculpting major. Dunng this time 
kolx-n 1 liwcf. professor of art. siyncd him on for the 
\tasicrs Apprentice (rranl. (iwHlinan credits Mower lor 
his success 

"I would nol be any w here in the world without him." 
(ii>oJman said. 

After leaiing K- Si ale a second time, he worked at 
odd (obs ami ended up part time al JS Sign and Design. 
He also works lull lime at Hal lard s and docs freelanc- 
ing on the side All this skipping around has helped him 
in Ins chosen profession 

"How many graphic designers have a background in 
computer prt)grumiiiing'.'" (itKMlinan said of his train- 
ing 

( iraphic designers are pcof le who give the rest of the 

^«mAorldan impression aboui then emploiyefs. whteh the 

eniplovers wanl the world lo have (ioodnun said a 

jirapliic dcsijiiicr has to be well versed in diplomacy lo 

steer clients jv\a\ fnnn particularly hideous designs that 




w. 



they've fallen in 

love with 

Goodman 
also said that as 
a graphic 

designer, he 
makes an e^ccl- 
lenl spy. He said 
in his profession 
he has to know 
what sort of 
businesses are 
mov ing to the 
area and what 
they like Often. 
companies 
eome to him 
with lop-secret 
deals such as 
logo changes .ind ask lot com pi el e secrecy. 

"I do things whenever people want me lo," (ioodmun 
said "It's nol very predictable, but your hours ate never 
very long " 

lor prospective graphic designers t iiXNJnian said the 
field IS relaiivcly easy to gel into, hut strong public -rela- 
tions skills are essential 

(i«HHlman alst) pointed out that graphic designers are 
a iighi-knit group 

"(Jtaphic designers slick logeihcr," ( loodman said 

Itc doesn't rceoinmend his gwn windinj} route, 
though 

"ikki: small busincsi «|ass«i,'**t3ljlbAnifl' laM. 
"Nearly every graphic designc'r docs freelance and 
every graphic dcMgner runs their mm small business in 
a way How much do vou eharue for an boor' How 



CItAIG GOODMAN it o grophic designer ol JS Sign and Dcitgn The new sign ol Lucky 's 
BrewGnlle n one ot Goodman's creoiions 



much do you charge for a pnnf' 1 recommend that for 
any artisi" 

Right now IS the best time to be a graphic designer. 
(loodman said, because the Internet allows him to do 
work for the Hast and West coasts 

.As a graphic designer, though, what do people thmk 
of (iiHidman's creative tastes ' 

Sieve l-lder. owner of the Ciamer, is satisfied with 
his sign 

"It's brought in a lot of customers." rider said. "It's 
bright, and I like how he set it up " 

The Pmwrcal logo has also met approval 
- "t ihtnk itX a more modem W^ (hu Willie," said 
Melody Ortlolf. freshman in Ingtish and secondafy 
educatittn *'ll give's a more 'Hh look lo the posters. It's 
a more streamlined look " 



Giveaway celel)ratef Halb\Veeii 




LiNDfIT FoatMf Ttl 

vrill *iik-i 

fnck or treat' 

lor the Union Program Council there are no locks 
involved. ju.sl treats. The UW Pramoiions Committee is 
giv ing K-Staie students a chance to celebrate Halloween 
two days early with a Halloween (iiveaway 

"People can stop in. or eome hy and pick something 
up." Mike Hodgson, senior in I nglish and president of 
UPt , said 'We'll make il a surpnse" 



Hodgson said the Promotions Commillee decides sev- 
eral events ihroughoui ihe year, but the Halloween 
Giveaway is an additional event. 

"We've done it in Ihc past, giveaways from linie to 
lime, to celebrate holidays and special occasions," 
Hodgson said 

The money iis«d to present this event is from K-Sate 
Student Union money, student lees, generated revenue, 
and instiliilional support. 

The Halloween Giveaway is an activity that draws 



Itself to people." Mixlgson said, "Anytime wc give away 
free stuff, people will naturally be interested ' 

( rom 4:3(1 am to 2 pm today, students are welcome 
to pick up f talloween treats at the Union, compliments ol 
the UPC. 

"The giveaway should lend a lot of participants, espe- 
cially in celebrating Hallov^t'en," IK>dgson said. 

The ghoulish festivity is inside the north entrance by 
the information counter Students arc encouraged to pick 
up surpnse treats earlier in the day, while supplies last 



Wichita group vents fierce rage 



fitm KfUUM 

Vent 

"l.ony losi Human" IP 

(Hvdra Head Records » 




•• t 






1-vil. hriit.il iiiiMTi hardcore is the name of the game 
here. 

Wichita's Vent is obviously 
in Hue need by the stable of 
bands on Victory Records, 
most notably Integrity. Strife 
and Snapea.sc 

"Reunion" occupies the A side and is one fierce, rag- 
ing song 

I really liked the arrangement of the song Most hand- 
core nowadays is pretty generic, using the same vocal 
siylings and chord progressions as evcfy other hardcore 
hand 

Vciit. on the otiicr hand, changes il up and uses har- 
monics t)n the guitars al limes Vent also uses a lot of noise 
and feedback, which add greatly to t lie song. 

The litle of the tV comes from a lyric from "Reunion," 
when the singer screams, "I 've seen it, long lost human. 



I've seen it, I am one." 

The \i side is another chunk of bruialily in the form of 
a track called "Hox In The ( ommodore " 

It's a more mid-paced tune than the A side It also 
stuinds thicker and heavier, if that's possible. 

I also liked (he contrasting dual vocals, with one 
Kcreaming high-pitched and ihc other growling. 

It's got a nice touch of evil lo it. 

"Hox In I he Commodore" ends loo quakly 

Overall, this is one beast of a single (hat eommand-s lis- 
tening. Pans of Ihc aforcmcnlioned Victory bands should 
seek this out 

Sargc 

"Stall" b/w "Ttme After Time " 

(Mudi'Para.sol Records) 

I could tell just from looking at the cover Sarge was 
going to be an indic rockcnto band. 

I was right 

Sarge is from IJrbana, III., and plays jangly indie mck 
with a definite poppy sound, yrl it isn't afraid to kick up 
the distortion and get all emotional a la Sunny [)ay Real 



Estate or Fugaj>i on you. 

fhe A side, "Stall," is a nice, mehxlic poft song that 
would fit perfectly on a label like Merge or K Records 

The vocals of lli/abelh I lm«irc fit in with (he song 
perfcMly 

The hand is light musically, as il gix,'s from pure pop to 
heavier, louder, emotional parts in a heartbeat 

The H side has the p<itential to either be really lerrihte 
or really great, bcvausc it's a cover ofthe Cyndi I jupcr hit. 
"TimcAftcTTime" 

I'm glad it's the latter ofthe two. 

When bands perform cover songs. I hey need lo inject 
their own sound and their own Havor into them Sarge does 
that pertecily 

ITmon: takes control ofthe keyboards for the intro and 
bndge of the song. 

This track is a lot louder and more emo than "Stall" is. 

I Itwed the choru.scs especially with their lurching, 
heavy guitars and driving drum beats 

This single makes me want to hear mivre of Sarge The 
buiul's label says it would appeal to fans of Talulah Gosh 
Lov'ks like I need to find stulThy them, too Vou should dt> 
the same 



NUMBER9 




DILBERT 



CAT6E^T ; EVIL HR. DIRtCTOR 



t CAN'T RAl&E YOUR 
SAilkRV LEVEL BECWJSE 
VOU OONT HAVE TtN 
YIARJ tUPtWEtslCE 
(aJITH "JAVA- COOIHG 

J 





WO&OOY HAS "TEN 
YtARi EXPERT ENCE 
WTTM MEU TECH- 
istOLOGV.' YOU'RE 
TU5T etING EVIL, 
AOfMT IT, 




MO COOLO YOO PLEASE 
SHAKE yOOR HEAD 
BACK ANO FORTH 
INSTEAD OF SPINNING 



\TT AROUND? 




10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WIDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1997 




DAVID WRIGHT, Oisociole professor of tofriily studies 
and fiumari lei vices, spendi me nootn Kogt on luesdoy 
ploying rocquetboll with Rusty Toylor ol tfie CKeslvr E 
Peteft Recreation Coffip)e«. 

rVAN KOZAft 

Cotlvgian 



De>v Nelson 
Press Box 

The following outlines ifie 
levels of the press box in 
KSU Stadium 
Grand l«v*l 

• Fan accommodalioni 
office 

• K-Stote 
memorabilia 

Second lew! 

• 2 club sealing 
suites (126 seats) 

• 7 luxury suites 

• University 
President's suite 

Third levaf 

• ) 4 luxury suites 

Fourth lovol 

• Medio row (seating for 
1 00 iournolists) 

• Wildcat Sports Network 
booth 

• Visiting team*' rodio 
booth 

• K-State and opponents' 
coaching suites 

• Visiting taoms' athletic 
director's suite 

• Scoreboard/ public 
address control 

Fifth lovol 

• Pfioto deck 

• Television crew/ 
onnouncer's booth 



MtKi il40fLHARDT/Cr,ll«g,gn 




Media 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 

uith rvj;L'ni<«. cimjircsMHcn. ihc jjovefnur 
and lUhcrr. m a unique siuwlion wTiiTf 
it'% pusMhk- 111 Ituvc tun ami ilu buMnvss 
ai the ^JllK' time." he sjij 

Ki'i'cnl quests in the suite hiive 
im;kiiled US SetiitturN Pat Roberts anil 
Sam BruMntuek, Utiv Uijl Ci raves. tW- 
mer K -Stale ituarterbaek l.vnn [)iikey 
an J others. Welald ^uu) tnothall jiames 
\Mlh miiin ot those indiMiJu^ls have 
helpeil advance iiniversii\ issues, he 
said. 

"It has K'en very fH:nclieial lor 
Kanvis State Uir nuking progress on 
simie impi>rlanl issues 'Ifc'efifid ^d 

I he new press box ha\ .dso con- 
trihuled to tile tuniarintiiU in K -State 
(■(Mil ball in recent years 

"I he way it used to be. nofnHly came 
111 our pines It vias a struggle lo keep 
the lans interested They could come 1 (1 
minutes betoie the game and still get 
preterreit seating." Welaltl said 

Now. v^ith a stronger program Jiid 
better Pact lilies, the m(H)d lus chani:cd 
he said 

"\ou v«e have an atmosphere that's 
almosi l.irger than the football jjame 
it sell." V^'etald said 

"JVople are jciuallv taking the whole 
dav to spend getting ready for tin* game, 
walchuig the game and after the game tl 
has iitn;ost become an event that tran- 
scends the giitne itself, and the press box 
IS pun of that " 



WeYc 




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TIM 
ENGLE 

K-State Grader 

Call Us For A Quote " 
3320 Anderson 




539-9200 



KSU Bakery 
Science Club 

Bake Sale Today 

3 to 5 pm 

Shellenberger Hall 

First Floor 



Flour Sale 

Every Wednesday 

Noon - 4 p.m. 
Shellenburger 220 



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t untilv tiu'ttitl & OitfrtiMi 




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llllHlillllCllV 
tllKts -S-lt 



■!«" tl Moss 
Itinpltit 
Hi Him 



""""' ■■■■|y«. ■T^-r.p^-T^w^T^^^^-.T^^.^^^^^ 



A Reminder To All 
Arts S Sciences Students.. 

Enrollment time is quickly 
I approaching so make an early 
appointment with your advisor. 

Arts & Sciences Comicil 



Form BurttQU InmrQncg 



Health Insurance 



call 537-0319 at 2630 Form Burvgu Rd Hanhattan. KS 



DMS BAIL BONDS 

GET OUT OF JAa NOW!!! 

Let DMS Bail Bondf help! If you, a family member or 
friend need assistance, I will be there. 24 hours a day 
seven days a week, I'm [>awtT Simms. Let me help you. 
I iTi mediate. Understanding, and C'onfideniial Service. 

W (7K5 1 5:56-552.^ 



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Premiums • Shots • Wells • Calls 
Bottles • Draws • Zimas • Etc. 

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t HKATIX'E TRAVEL 

Mm Attdcrsun, Suite 1001 B 
tall53WI5.11 

or l-WMJ.748.7H2Urorinro. 



I ATTENTION STUDENTS:! 

NEED CASH? 

m FlKSr (DONATION 
m SECOND DONATION 
HH'UI^N I70N0KS EAItN 




MANHATTAN BIOMEDICAL CENTER 
1130GAROENWAV 776-9177 

MON.-FRI. 9 A.M. -6:30 P,M.*SAT 



CENTER SS 

76-9177 (^ 

9A.M.-2P,M. >Si' 



SP 



SCHOLARSHIP ACCESS 

• Do you find yourself borrowing hundreds, even thousands of dollars each school 
year? 

• Is your G.P.A. less than perfect? 

• Are you independently wealthy, and tired of shelling out your nnoney for school? 

• Wouldn't you gladly pay $100 next school term instead of the full tuition amount? 

Scholarship Access guarantees you at least 10 sources of nnoney from the 
private sector. 

For more iniormatlon call or sand your name and address to; 

Scholarship Access 

t0308 Metcalf, Suite 337 

Overland Park, KS 66212 

(913)385-9599 



f 



DEADLINES 

Clatillied odt muil b« ploctd 

by noon tK« doy Wwt the 

date )rau wont your od lo run 

Clouihed diiploy odi must be 

pteced by 4 p (n two wording 

day) prior to the dale you 

wani your od lo run 



t, 



i 







QOfSTtONSI 



KANSAS STATE COUEGIAN 




CLASSIFIED AD WRITING TIPS 

^ Uft H*mi or MrvicM Rr*t. Alwa/i put what item 
or ietvice you are advertising fir si This helps polen 
tial buyers find whoi they are looking (or 

^ Dgn't UM abbravtatiofi*. Many buyers are cot« 
(used by abbreviations 

ContkJw including flw pric*. This telts buyers if 
they ore looting at something m their price range. 



It 



»i»l? 



BULLETIN BOARD 



OK 



Anneun««ffMnts 



•S CASH FOR COU.E6E 

tS GRANTS AND SCHOL 
ARSMtPSAVAIlABlE 
FROM SPOIvlsriRSMi 
GREAT OPPOniUNITY 
CALL NOW 1(100)532-8890 

1998 HOVAL PURPLE t 
Purchflt« orT« today 
Stop bv 103 Ksdil*. 
Buy now for ovtly 
S24 9S. 

AOVAMCED FUOKT 

THAIMNG trom 7.000 
tiour ATP instructor Mulli 
(tngirre ATP tt^rouyti ftingle 
engine ixivole. Kugtt Irvin, 
539-31?a 

DAVIS IMOVES special 

l/tng in iiofTimorcial tnd 
raaidenllal maviM. \ou 
pack, we mov«. We witl 
iMd your trud; or trailer, 

CHDVOU FOROET 
YOUR 1997 ROYAL 
PURPLE with CD-flOM? 
Pick it up TO DAY in 
103 Kadiia.Thvv can 
•tilt bs purchaaad. 
whita tuppltaa lait for 
juat «29 9S 

Dfl. LOVES Art LI II Video 
Cjf^SffrtF' Rr^nUlts & Salfis 
CO ROMS, book «oiB, 
laaitiei noveiitei and loy^. 
UpiTi &p IT1 Monday ttirij 
Saturday Muhl Lk.> tS lu 
EnlRi Dfl. LOVES « EX- 
OTIC DANCERS, IMC. A 
Bepr Riir tf"rr,ak^ fJjf>r,ers 
naericd Mutt be 21 to en 
l«r, TiJflsdiiy ttiru Satur 
day 8p ni 1 7p m 639 
0190. hup cvvvvw kan 
Mt.nnt/-drluvb« E mail. 
drlovei "tianui9.net 

EXPERIENCED WEIGHT 
trainnr lur tiim Make 
gains «' lo^ fai' 100% 
gtiaranlee and reaaonabie 
rate*. CallWuistanVany 
for »ppoir>t<n«"i. 56&^ 90?5 



i CASH QUANTSI 

Colli^qfi SiJ I olar strips 
8usiit(?tis Medical t}jlls 
tMevei repay loll tree 18001 
J18 9000 Eld G1916 

LEAflNTOFLYiKSlate 
Ftyiiiy Clut) \\a^ five air 
planes. low«st rate^ fot in- 
(orciifltiiiii rati 539-37J3. 

0201 

tost and FoMod 

F^und ada can b« 
placed free for three 



LOSr EYEGLASSES, t)lu« 

wiiH riftij 111 Miap caw. 
Ileal ^ouUi side of mmpus 
hi! 22M 




ADO A extrd toui:h ut class 
to your nRxf padyt Call 
Wavno\WHi»r Party lor 
portablit hnt riil> ref^lall. 
537 7587 

ADDA spiafit^ lo vour iieKI 
battt Call Wei N Willi Hoi 
Tub 1 liir yniir nam party al 
1913)537 187S 



For Rent- 
A pts. Furniihod 

ALLetLLSPAIDIIII Tvro- 
bedroom Mitt> washer/ dry- 
er One block tram cam- 
pus AIno with parking 
space Call 776- 9798 Only 
S375 

UNWERSTTY COM- 
MONS Roommales need 
♦jd Soverai two-twdroom 
apadmimis needing a sec- 
ond roominaie. Fuliy fur- 
nibbed, many student serv- 
ices. Individual leues. 
fHsase call 5%-MI71 

110| 

For Ront- 
Apt. 
Unfuralshod 



per moittt^, avallatilG im- 
mediately. Shod term 
lease ok Water and Hash 
paid Has dishwasher and 
on sile laundry. Call for 
and appointniani MDt 
776-3804 

1201 



Houaas 



1 Bedrooms First 
Month FREE 

Call li>r daily 

spixial * limitfd 

niimhcr '539-2951 



^ Aftartment 
Living At Its Beit 
iMrge 2 -Bedrooms 

N 

Sandstone Apiv 

Cambridfic Sij. Apis 



Hill 

Itivestnifnt 

$295 1310 ONE BEOflOOM 
spedmants available now 
and Jan 1 No pats. 587- 
0399 

AVAILABLE NOW or sec 
Oftd tameiter. Oifleranr 
stres, some furnished. 
Most utilities paid Ouiet 
and clean Shod term 
lease available 537-8389. 

AVAILAetE NOW! 1 1 Slu 
diQ apartment is within 
walking distance to uni 
vefsiiy. E yarything elec- 
tric, water/ trash paid 
539-8318 or 537-8228 

AVAILABLE ONE. two. 
three, tour tiedroofrtf. nice 
apedmenit near campus 
with great prices. Firat 
momh tree. 97 1666 



AVAILABLE SECOND se- 
mester Four tMKlroom, 
two bath, oft street perk 
ing, large garage. Quiet 
and clean, campus close, 
pat considered. 537 8389 

BRICK HOME, new carpet, 
paint, three or four-tiad 
rooms with two bath 
rooms Kitchen appliances, 
pilio, enclosed yard, close 
to campus, 539-1177 

HOLJSE FOR rental 1130 
Pomoroy Four- bedroom. 
two bath, with study 
taOO/ month, trash paid 
Close to campus Washer/ 
Dryer hookups. No pets. 
Call tMDI 776-3804 

MUST SEE this tttree-bed 
lOom house Two baih, 
lull tinishad basement. 
S525 Cat! 539 3998 or 
776--*839 tielore 6pm , aik 
lor Jason 

TWO BEDROOM. ONE 
bath, washer/ dryer, sir- 
conditioned Close to cam- 
pus Brand new $400 ptiJS 
utilities 1129Ctsllin 
539 8673 or l7e6IB42-M73 



2 Bedrooms for 
the Price of 1 

liinitcd number \cU 
call 539-2951 



^9 



Manluttan Crty Ordi- 
nance 4814 assures 
•vary person eq^ial op- 
portunity in tvausinf) 
witfiout distinction on 
account of race, sea. 1%* 
milial status, military 
Btaius. disabilrty. reli- 
gion, aga, color. r>a- 
llonal origin or anc*!* 
try. Violation* should 
be reported to tiM Di- 
rector of Hunnan Re- 
sources at City Hall, 
U7-.2440. 



^ ; ^ 

"^■tt\J III 

Ufii/ii-dty" 

• New 

• Fully Furnished 

• 2 & 4 Bedroom 

• Alarm System 

• Swimming Pool 

NOW Leafing 
939-0500 



T TNIVERSrrV 




APARTMENTS 

22\b COllFGE AVE 



CUTE, ONE BE Dfl OOM 
epadmeni close to KSU 
campus 413 N 1 7th. $385' 
month with waior/ Irash 
paid Laundry facilities lo- 
cated on sue. Kitchen com 
plete witt> stove, relrig 
erat'jr, slid dishwasher, 
Unntwaitr Call MDI 
7 76 jsn-t 

NOW LEASmO. One to 

three berlrooni aFutrt 
ments' tvouses near KSU, 
S225 lu K'M Alllanc* 
Prof>*rty Managamant 
SSS-AOS?. 

OCTOBER AVAILABILITY 
at 1005 Bluemonl Ave 
One tied room, $386/ 
irrnntb. Water and tra«l> Is 
paid Close to campus. Cell 
tylOl 776-3804 

ONE BEDROOtW APART 
ME NT available imme- 
diately Just across the 
sireet trom campus at 1807 
College Heighis. S39&' 
month Stove, refrigerator, 
and diifiwasher included 
Water jtnd trash paid 
Laundry facilities located 
on Site Call MDI to view I 
776-3604 

STUDIO APARTMENT 
Nice one-bedroom, heat 
paid. $295 plus weterf 
trash 1019 Houston. 1- 
600 397 2436 ttien 874 
5117 OPEN TODAY' 

THREE FIVE BEDROOMS 
Otte block lo campus. 
Newly remodeled Must 
see Ki belleval All the 
ameniiiAs Reasonable 
renl 539-4641 

TWO- THREE BED 
ROOMS One tjlodi to cem 
pus Vary nica with all 
emenitiea Reasonable 
rem 539-4641 

TWO BEDROOM AND lour 

tiedrocim apartmenis close 
to campus Rent lor 14 
months staning November 
1 end receive first monlh 
end lasl nwnth rent free 
No pels Call 778-1 340 

TWO BEDROOM APART 
ME NT within walking dis 
lance of KSU Availabia 
now I 1026 Osage, $496/ 
month Water and trash 
paid Stove, retngerator, 
and ditbwasher Call MDI 
776 3804 

UNIVERSfTY TEMIACE 
AMRTMENTS tensing 

tor til 1 1 or Slimmer, large 
iwo and three bedroom 
apadments with wastier, 
dryer hookups Poot. BST- 



BRANPNEW 

CAMPUS CREST 

APARTMENTS 

1620 McCain Lane 

4 Bedroom with 2.3. 

or 4 person 

tx:ciipancy rates. 

• 2 person $500 
■ 3 person $690 

• 4 person $860 

Villi r iiim ,111 J JiintMrv 

/i-aw^ ttutihthtt' 

Many^icd by 

McCuIlough 
Development 

776-1004 

liMr ..,>-„.j.|.- .-I.... 



For Salo 



1 4X60 TWO B£ DHOOM. 
mar^ improvmenta, newty 
redecorated, new air con. 
d It loner, washer/ dryer, 
shed Close to campus. 
S9500or beat offer, 
587-9584 

VERY NICE hAO-bedroom 
two bath New living room 
cerpet. All electric. cei>trat 
air Anderson Realty 776 
4834 or Sharon at 776 7903 



Roommate 
Wantod 



$20a' MONTH plus one- 
tourlh utilities, walk lo 
campiis: very ciean^ water/ 
Iresh paid, deposit re 
(}Uirfld^ 633^785; wee 
kends 537 4941 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
r»eeded for second semes 
(er. Cloae to campus 
tAlater and Irasti paid 
587-S356 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
t>eeded tar apadmeni nein 
semester. January July. 
Nice environment end 
friefully roommeles. Janu 
ary rent is free. 
mks92l3 " ksu.edu 
565-9439 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted to sublease tJnt- 
versity Commoris Apart- 
ment Rent $260/ month 
plus one fourth uitlitiet 
Available mid December- 
August Call 776-0981 

FEMALE ftOOMMATE 
wanted, tWoodway Apart 
mems. $265 a montti plus 
one halt tiills. lease until 
June 19981 1303)751-1841 

MALE ROOMMATE want 
ed to stiare two-bedroom 
apadmeni at Atularson 
Fhaoa Call Brian el 
687-9157 

ROOMMATE WANTED Be- 
ginning Docomtjor. to 
share ivio-bedroom, two 

bath t rai let Wain ui Grove, 
six miles East of Manhat 
tan, $180 a month plus or>e 
halt iitilines. Water/ iraib 
paid Small pals oliay 
Amanda or Oshbie 
1785)494-2974. 

TWO ROOMMATES want 

nd $200/ monttt All bills 
paid 776-4954 

IMl 



WALK TO campusl Two- 
bedroom apadment local 
•d at 1113 Bertrand. $600 



AVAILABLE tMME- 
DIATEIY, one bedroom 
apadmeni $370* morrth 
piueOM end electric 
Cloae la GMnpusI Celt 
776-S138 

DECEMBER GRADUATES 

Two tiadroom sublaeaa in 



Kansas City, 1t5tti and Met- 
calf . Lease runs December 
t May 31 $700 total ptus 
utilitios Coll 770 9309 

FEMALE ROtMMMTE 
WANTED lo take over 
leasw S2^ month plus 
one third utilities Three- 
bedroomi and two baths. 
Close to campus Call 
776-9451 

ONE BEDROOM FOR sub^ 

leaiie, semi furnished if 
needed, located in Cam- 
bridge Square Caihederal 
ceilings, private decks, off 
bedrooms can move in Do 
cemtMr or January. 
567-0991 ask tor James. 

SUBLEASERNEEOEOi 
Room availatite in tour- 
bedroom house, very close 
lo campus, Waatter and 
dryer, lOISCIaltin Call 
Jessica. 539-1828 or 539- 
1239, 

TRAILOR HOME bedroom. 
Female, non- smoker 
Jenuary- May $300 a 
monit) plus one-lhird utili- 
iies. Call Micbelle, 
77&-0SO4 




SERVICE DIRECTORY 



2101 



flosumo/ 



539-5996. FOB all typing, 
editing, prool reading, 
tape transcripton, (papers 
thesii, dissadation. books, 
reeumee, oovariettert). 30 
plu* years experience 

NEED SOMETHMO 
TYP60I I II type papers 
lor $1 per double spaced 
page. I can also type 
reaurrtAs- Ctioote one of 
my styles for $15. I'll create 
your style lor $20. Call 
Wanda al 53?-0724 7 30 
a.m.- 3:30 p.m. or leave 
voice mail 



ais| 

Doaktop 
PubHshlng 



SEIKOCOLORPOINT Dye- 
Sub combo waH ihermal 
color printer. New in bOK. 
Never used $2995 Lists at 
$8000 Call 776 5999 

2S0| 



Automotlvo 
R»palr 



AUTOGRAFT 2016 Service 
Circle liehindWalMart 
Specialiring in Nitsan-Dat- 
sun, Ho r>da. Toyota, Sub- 
aru, Hyundai and Ma^da 
537 6049 



ass] 

other 
Sorvlcos 



COMPPEHENStVE MAJOR 
Medical Coverage for short 
or continuous terms for 
nrore information call 
639^6949 

LOSE 37% MORE 

WCIOHT.., and 48% more 

tall Pyruvate has 16 years 
clinical testing ai a major 
US Medical School Prov 
en lo lose mote weight 
faster and keep n otfl All 
natural, sate. Call BM-839- 



^ao 



EMPLOYMENT/CAREERS 



3101 



Help Wantad 



Manhattan City Ot* 
nance 4814 •asures 
every pereon equal of^ 
portunrty in securlrtg 
and holding emplOY- 
mettt in arry field of 
worli or labor for wHi^ 
he/ sfie is pmperty quell- 
tled regardfeas of race. 
aeii, mtlltery atatus, dle- 
ebillty. religion, age, 
color, nattorkal origin of 
Bf»ceetry. Violellona 
abouM be reported to 
the Director of Human 
Resources at Ctty Hell, 
B37-OOM 

The Coli a gt en eanrKM 
verity the financial po- 
tentiel of advertieo- 
menls In ttt* Empley- 
nwnt/Cerear cleeeMIe*- 
tton Reetfere are ed- 
trl s ed lo ap p eoec*! any 
euc^ employment op- 
portunity with re«aori- 
arbie caution. The Col- 
logian urges our read- 
ers to contact tfu Set- 
ter Business SureoM, 
601 B« Jvrfereofi.To- 
IMlte, KS «Ma7 UtO, 

Wtaa n - W A. 

$1000 POSSiaL£ TYRNG 

pert time At Home, Toll 
Free (11800 216 9000 Eld T 
1911 lor Listing, 

S31 OOi HOUR Our top tel 
eaelea rape meke tfiat 
moutii and morel Wa atao 
oflat benefits. Inaideand 



outside positions, paid tain- 
ing, and oppodunily tor 
advancemeni We prom 
ote talent from within the 
organ/ation We are seek- 
ing five iridividiials to till 
positions that have opened 
due to growth We have 
tulland pari time positions 
available. Call 1913) 
492-7750, ask tot Mr. Mil 
ton. 

$1500 WEEKLY potential 
mailing nur circulars. No 
Experience Retiuired Free 
information packet Call 
410 783 8272 



i EXCITING 

::Part-Time 

iiEmploxmenti: 

I I Join tlir Villi) Mn I' 
Ifiirn. ffprt-wtilliin 
nur prtKliHt hikI 

Sfivtces In the 

Miinhnllan Dtllort 

Food vSlort", ni-.Kll)lc 

huurs, 20 hours pc*r 

w«*k rtilulinum, 

Kalnry ptiis 

C-tltt1IlllHSl()Il. 

Call Hrjily SiiinkT, 

I THS-MT-.rilSH, 

Vitlii l.ltif. •nil- 

Td r p t ic itic ( ■ titnt lit iiy . 

KOK. 



$600* WEEKLY $1t per 
envelope Send self ad- 
dressed stamped envel 
ope: GMA,PO Box 13488, 
Atlania, Georgia 30324, E 
malLGENMAR 
KET " Bol com 

ADMINISTRATIVE AS^ 
SISTANT^ Administrative 
assistant needed tor fast 
paced construction office 
in the Manhattan,' Ft. Riley 
area slatting December 
1997 MuftbaaUato 
work Independently and 
wellwilhothars General 
duties include. Typing cor- 
respondence, reports, con- 
tracts, etc.. Payroll, Invoic- 
es, Maintaining chedr 
tiook. cenified payroll, an- 
swering phones, filing and 
purctiasing supplies for the 
office. Experience in Mi 
Crosoft Window 595. Lotus 
123andAS40Claplus Sel 
ary commensurate with ex 
perience. Please send re- 
surTMtoM.A Modenson, 
PO. Boa 1546. Columbia, 
MO6520S,Ann Dale Het 
er, 

ARRANGE YOUR Spring 
semester |0b now. Kaw 
VaUey Greenhouse. Irtc is 
tnMfvtfwng now to start 
in Decambar, January or 
February Enjoyatilework 
atmosphere, competitive 
pay and opportunity Call 
776-8585 tietween 3:00 and 
4:30pm 

BASE PLUS COMMI5 
SION. First year earnings 
can exceed $45,000 Fir si 
month earnings can 
exceed $40001 We ere for- 
tune 500 company grow 
ing locally in Lenexa We 
are seeking talented indi 
yiduals to tilt positions in 
our sales department Wa 
offer $19,000^ $22,000 
bese, weekly commissions, 
no travel, full benefits, op- 
portunity tor adver>ce 
mentt It you are inieresed 
In more information cjr 
would like a phone inter 
view, pleasa call 1913) 
492 -8780 and ask for Ken- 
ny 

CANWETAUt7Wanla 

part time job that |>avmfull 
lime^ Want e guaranteed 
hourly wage, plus (khius 
es7Then cell met M- F, 
1 p m - 9pm.. 587-4114 esk 
for Sharon 

COMPUTER INFORMA 
TION Special ir («304l. Pad 
or Full-time, temporary po- 
siiion, not 10 exceed 12 
monlfis, in ihe (^partmeni 
ol Agronomy. B S degree 
in computer science olus 
til months experience with 
C-r+,Visuat Basic, and 
Windows 3 1/95 Knowl 
edge ol torage manage 
nrwnt and/ or cow-calf pro- 
duction systems helpful 
but not required. Send lei- 
ter ol applicaiion. reaunte, 
transcripts, and arrartge for 
three letters of reference to 
be sent lo Dr Gerry L. 
Poster. Head, Depadmem 
of Agronomy, Throdimor 
Ion Plant Sciencae Canter, 
Kansas Stale University, 
Manhattan. KS 66S06-580T. 
Application deadline: Oc- 
lober 29. 1997 Kansas 
Stale University Is an At 
fitmative Actiorv equal op 
podunity employer. KSU 
encrxj rages diversity 
among its employevs. 

IMTASASE PHO- 

ORAMMEU- Netwodis 
Plus. th« lender in provid- 
ing business, education 
arxi government computer 
services, has an openirvg 
tor iMIh tuM and half time 
positions in our product 
development group Ex 
perience in database envi- 
ronments required, MS Ac 
^pss end HTML knowledge 
preferred Salary range 
$20,000 $35,000 plus bo- 
nuaes and ttenefiia Send 
raaumetotMrd Morgan, 
Networka Ptus, 317'A Mous 
ton Street, Menheltan, KS 
88602. 



EARNFREETSIPSa 
CA8HI CLASS TRAVEL 
needs students to promote 
Spring Break 19961 Sell) 5 
trips 8i travel tree' Mghty 
motivaited tludaerts can 
earn a f r e e trip S over 
t10,MOI Cliuuso Can 
cun, Bahamas, Maratlan, 
Jamaica, or Ftoridal North 
Amentia s largest student 
tour operatorl Call Nowt 
t 800838 6411 

LOONINa KM THE l»ER- 
FECT SUMMER JOS7 

(develop ledder&tiip skills 
and gain experience im 
ptemenling community 
projects. For more infor- 
mation call the Community 
Service Program at 532- 
5701 

MULTMWEOIA STUD- 
ef#T ASSISTANT Pro- 

rtuco w*jti':,Lli'S vidfni and 
other muin Mii-,Ti,-] Nr?od 
reiovant compim^r .i^fiori- 
ence; prefer communica- 
tions related mejor 10 20 
hour/ week Apply 148 Wa- 
ters Hsil 

PARTTIME WORK for col 
lege students. Make your 
own schedule Earn up to 
$50- $200/ per week Prov- 
en resume builder tor all 
majors Scholarships, in 
terships. co-ops availatjie. 
Conditions apply Work in 
Manhattan Interview at 
personnel office inTo[>eka. 
Call 1785)228 1144 M F, 
12 4p.m. 

RAOUL S ESCONDIDOS 
Now accepting applicationa 

for servers and cooks 
Apply Monday- Friday bet- 
ween 2pm. 4p,m 216 
Seth Child Road 

THE KANSAS STATE COL 
LEGIAN, K State s student 
produced daily newspaper. 
IS now accepting applK»- 
tions for spring 1996, pO«i- 
tions in adva diking and 
newt Included are paid po- 
siiions in advertising-sales, 
reporting, copy editing, 
photojournellsm, graphici. 
art and electronic publish- 
ing. It's B great opportunity 
to apply your skills and 
gem invaluable hands-on 
experience. Applic:ations 
and more information are 
available m Kediie 103. Ap 
plications ere due S p m 
Wednesday. Nov. 17 

THOROUGH HOUSE clean 
ing for couple wilh nu pets, 
smoking, cfiildren. Flejuble 
sttiedule. Adiacent lo cem 
pus Respond with letter 
and oualiticalions lo Col- 
legian txjx t 

WANTED MOTIVATED, 
reliable person to work lull- 
time on diversified crop 
farm Experience with 
farm e<)uiplment. cropping 
operations and shop work 
are needed Good pay for 
night person 25miies 
northeast of Manhattan 
1785)457-3440 

WANTED: SANTA Clans. 
Mature people needed for 
professional Santa Clause 
assignment Good with 
children and able to work 
four and one half hours, 
day and evening shifl 
weekdays or weekends: 
Novemt»er ?2- December 
24 Experience tielptui, but 
natural Santa personality 
rTMXt important Call Re 
tiactiont f^otography at 
539 1550 

WANTED SANTAS help 
era Musi tw good wllti 
^Idran Weekday and we 
kand shifts available Must 
t>e available NovemtMr 22 
DecerntHii 24 Call Reflec 
tions PhotiigrBphy el 
539-16S0 

3M| 

Bdainoss 
Oppoitimltlas 

DESIGN AND coordinate 
odvenising lor aniiorul me- 
dia, monifily mailings, dai- 
ly assignments, tor ag- 
gressive mail order com 
pany. Pay is commasurale 
With eblity Send resume 
lo Golden Sea Graphics. 
PO Box 36. Green leaf. KS 
68943 

EARN MONEY and FREE 
TRIPS 1 1 Atwoluia Best 
SPRING BREAK Packages 

available 1 1 iNDt VI DUALS. 
Student ORGANIZATIONS, 
or small GROUPS want 
edit Call INTER CAMPUS 
PROGRAMS ai 1-800- 
327-6013 or 
hup ://wyyw.ci pt.corrt 




itsa ROYAL PtmrtEi 



Slop by 103 Kedaie. 
Buy mw for only 
S24.9*. 

ANTIQUES. COLLECTI- 
BIES. tools, books, furni- 
ture, ettale fewelry. beer 
signs, Ihousandt ot curi- 
ous goods. Tima Ma^iiine 
AnliQue Meul and Rea 



Market 4910 Skyway Or. 
tMttween Brlggs and air- 
pod 539-4684. 

CABLE DE SCRAMBLER kit 
$14.95. See all the premi 
um arid pay per- view chan 
nets < 800)752- 1389. 

COOK BOOKS, Vintage li- 
cense tags, encyclopedia's, 
l>ladi rnerrtorabitia, diurcft 
windows, oriental furnitur 
and potery, Wntege maga- 
II net. tiook*. religuous, 
hais, radios, clodts, auto, 
toots, canrtaros, albums, fur 
niture. potery, estate jew- 
elry, American herltege 
tiooks, movie stills , tavern 
slult, brass, trunks, mili- 
tary, tins, iteint, 50 s turni 
tuie, flute, prima, floor 
lamps, new car trailer 
$1499, new 5x 9 tilt trailter 
$599, 8000 Square feet of 
curious goods Time Ms 
diine Antique and Flea 
Market 4910 Skyway Dr 
Lietween airport and 
Briggs. Visa, MaelerCard, 
leyaway 539^4684 open 
12:00pm, 5: OOpm, Tues- 
day thru Saturday, 

K'STATE PUftPlE or 
QOLOaUTTER too 

pound drums, $75/ drum, 
you haul samplet- 785- 
843-1606, lorcade-t'com- 
puterve.com 

SELLING ALL my oil paint- 
ing stuff. Some new, tome 
used Call 776-5999 

SONY PLAYSTATION, con 
trots, meriKirv card, tttree 
games ^00, call Rod 
775-7482 

WATERBED MATRESS 
King-tire wvttb ^ave reduc 
tion Cost $360 will sell 
$175 1-800-397-2438- then 
874-5117 



WWWSUPERIORA 
CUR A COM VIEW our en- 
tire line ot new AND pre- 
owned Acura's. Ask for Pa- 
Iridi J Sterner <1 rated 
Acura web sile in the ne 
tioni 



Fumtturo to 

Buy/Sail 

APARTMENT SIZE freerar 
futon, bar, bat ttools, beer 
iignt, keg cooler/ tapper, 
tlesk. sofa, dining set, en 
tedainmenl center, com 
puier desk, miscellaneous. 
539-3119 

JEIW]rS WHOLESALE 

CAHFtl. Carpet remnenis 
and vinyl remnants 504 
Yuma Monday- Friday. 
SSOa.m - 5:30p.m Set 
8a m - 12p.m. Open to the 
public 

4Ul 



TIekaUto 

Buy/Ball 



Coffiptiti 



MONITOR RE PAIft.quidi 
and reliable service Free 
pidi up and delivery Call 
tnlend 776-0311. 

PACKARD BELL Pentium 
i;OMHZ 16MBRAM, 28.8 
modem, 4XCD 15 inch 
nwniior, $800, call Ketby 
between 7pm 10pm , 
565-0281 



4Ml 



BABY UMBRELLAS. Blue 
and gold Macaws. Hahnns 
Macaws, sweet, tun, cuddly 
rare Love Birilt, Codiatlles. 
5»-1177. 



Sporttng 
Bqulpmatit 

GOVERNMENT SUR 
PLUSIt Camoutlege cloth 
ing, boots, rainwear, wool 
clothing AlsoCARMARTT 
WORKWEAR Monday 
Fnday 9a m - S 30p m Sat 
urdey 9a,m - Sp m St 
Maryi Surplus Sales, St 
Marys, Kansas. 1785)437 
2734 



Btaroo 

ALPINE CD changer ntodal 
5870 Like new 53940SS. 



TICKETS WANTED: HSU- 
Colorada tootbell game 
Student section or other 
Will buy one or two Call 
collect (786)331 -2031 
10a m 8pm or (7851841- 
5394 9p,m lOem 

WANTED K STATE vs 
CotoradQ tickets WiH tjuy 
any numtwr of liokelB. Call 
collect 1913) 829-7350, atk 
for Mary 




199T CHEVY S-10, 67 K, 
4.3L V 6. automatic, anii- 
lodi t?rake syttem. cruise, 
air condition I r^, dean, 
very dependel>le, new 
tires, ahodit. titakea. 
$5900. 565-9720. 

1985 MUSTANG GT con 

vertible cuttomired Too 
many new parts lo list. 
Must seel $5500 or beat 
offer 587-9271. 

FOR SALE 1992Efflgle 
Talon Tsi Excellent condi 
bon. call Tare at 539-8tna 
for details 

PAINT rriHJRPLE per 

feci tor tailgate, till pquiped 
1979 Win r>at}ago motor 
home. 9ood condition 73K. 
reasonable, S3S-4TS3 

SEIZED CARS from 
S17S. Porsches, Cadillacs. 
Chevys, BMW s. Corvettes 
Also Jeeps. 4WD s Your 
Area Toll Free 1 800 218 
9000 Ext A 1915 lor cur 
rent listings 

5301 



Kietorcyclas 



19raNINJA600R Jetted, 
custom pipes, bra. extras. 
Runs great, $1850 or tiest 
offer. 633-8925 

1994 KAWASAKI Ninft 
250 Black, purple, 
566-0242 

FOR SALE Yamaha 199} 
Seca, red, sharp, $2999 or 
best oiler 539-0293 



am 



TRAVEL /TRIPS 



flIS 



Braak 



SPRING BREAK 98 Mi 

Airtiliu. ^^--^1.., ,{|^l,;:, 'iL..lyl. 

translers, padies For 
brochure or earning MEE 
trip 1-800-395-4896 
Iwww.collegetoura cam) 

I' Free 

tuod and drniii&i Cancun, 
Bahamas. Jamaica and 
Florida from $399 Org art 
lie a small group and trav 
el treat Highest commit 
lions aiKl lowest prices^ 
Call Surf & Sun Tours to 
become a campus repra 
tentative 18001574-7577 

"SPRING BREAK Take 
2-" Hiring Bops' Sell IS. 
Take 2 Free Hotlesi Desli 
naiions' Free Parties. Eats 
aiKi Drinks. SunSplath 1- 
800-426-niO. 




Chase Manhattan 
Apartments 

Comer of College and 
ClaOin, Manhattan 



now LEASino for 

MEXT SEMESTER 
1,2,3 ft 4 Etedroom Units 
^'Deck/Patios for each unit 
'On-site Qym, Pool, ft Laundry 
'Covered Parking 

atse«*s***«*e**«*«**e*4ee** 

CALL TODAY! I 
(785) 776 3663 



ClassiFiedRATES 

1 DAY 

20 wordi or leii 

$715 

•och word oYet 30 

$.20 per vyord 

2 DAYS 

20 wordi or leit 

JBiO 

eocK worij oyer 20 

t.25 per word 

3 DAYS 

20 wofds Of If u 
$9 45 

eoch word ovw 20 
130 per word 

4 DAYS 

20 wofdi Of )tM 
tl020 

»och word ovet 20 
} 35 per word 

SDAYS 

20 words or Itu 

$1070 

eoch word ov«r 20 

$ 40 per word 

I cooseci/hv8 dtjy ral« ) 



HOW TO MY 

All cloiiiheds rttuit be 

poid in odvance unleu 

you Kove on occounl 

with Siudenl 

Publicotioni liK 

Cosh, check, 

AtoslerCard or Viio are 

occapled. There it o 

$10 ftrtkt charge or> 

oil reiirrned checlii 

^ reierve the right to 

edil, re|ect or pioperty 

cbiiif^ any od 



ntf E f OUND ADS 

Al o service lo you, we 

fwn found adi for three 

doyi (»« of chotge 



CORRECTIONS 

II you find on error in 

your od. pleoie col' ut. 

Wfc octepi rejponjibili- 

ff onfy for Ihe finl 

wrOfi0 initrhOft, 



CANCEUATIONS 

)f you sell your item 

before your od froi 

•xpirod, vvt will refund 

you (or the remointng 

doys You must coll us 

before noon the dcry 

befoie the od is to tiB 

publisfied 



HEADUNES 

For on extra charge, 

we'll put a heodlinc 

ol»ve your od to colch 

the reodeii otieniioo. 



OQO 



BULLETIN OOARO 



HOUSINC'REAL ESTATf 




SERVICE DIRECTORY 



300 



EMPLOVMENT CanEERS 




TO PUCE AN AD 

Go to K«(izie 1 1)3 
locrou Irotti the K -Skill 
Siwtetit Untonl Office 

houft are MiMtday 
lltfOUQh Friday ftom 8 

am to5pm The 

offita it open except 

on Holidayt. 



13 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEONESOAY, OCTOftER 39, 1997 



Houston man executed for 1983 slayings 



II 



AStOCMnO Plt» 

HUNTSVILLE. Texas — A man was 
executed by injeclion Tuesday Tor panic- 
ipaling in a I9H3 stabbing frenzy at an 
amusement center that left four men 
dead in one of Houston's worst murder 
rampages. 

In his last statement, Kenneth Ray 
Kansnm insisted he was innocent 
and said hi.s death would be "an 
instrument to abolishing the death 
penalty" 

He apologized to the victims* fami- 
lies not because he fell guilty, hut 
"because of the pain all of ihcm arc 
going through each holiday, each birth- 
day that they're withoui their loved 



ones," 

Ransom, 34, 
fatally stabbing 
one of the four 
employees at the 
Malibu Grand 
Prix, a video 
arcade and go- 
can track in 
southwest 
Houston. 

An accom- 
plice. Richard 
Wilkcrson, 29, 
was executed 
four years ago 
and a third par- 
ittapant. James 



was condemned for 
(,4 

Tliol't the whole tdto 
d A\t ihing. lo eitKule 
i/lKM who or« guillr. 

• DermlaTfint 

mothir of man who 
watlloin 



.,, 



Randle. who was 16 at the time of the 
July I. I9K3, killings, is serving a life 
sentence. 

On that night, the three went to the 
amusement center, ostensibly so 
Wilkerson could pick up his final pay- 
check He had been fired two weeks ear- 
lier. 

Testimony at their inals indicated the 
three wcie armed with butcher knives, 
stole about $1,300 and repeatedly 
slabbed the night manager and three 
employees. One victim was stabbed 22 
times 

Ransom, who had scr\cd previous 
prison terms fur burglary and aiiio thed, 
insisted he did not kill any one but 
said he held down one of the victims 



because he was forced to do so by 
Wilkcrson 

Ransom became the 32nd Texas 
death row inmate to be executed this 
year, adding to what already is a record 
year for executions in the state At least 
seven more inmates have execution 
dates scheduled For this year 

"Thai's the whole idea of the thing, 
to execute those who are guilty," said 
Donnie Trent, whose 22-ycaf-otd son. 
Roddy Mams, was among the four 
killed 

Trent said she would have liked to 
talk with Ransom lo ask her which of 
the three killed her son. 

"It's just something a mother wanl.s 
to know," she said 



Foot 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

rier retaining wall will also be placed 
antund the property lo bounce sound 
away from the church 

The congestion of Anderson Avenue 
at Denison Avenue and 1 7th Street also 
Muses problems for students from greek 
houses along Laramie Street and 
Sunset Avenue v^ho walk to class every 
day 

Kelly Dclkcr. senior in finance and 
president of Alpha EX'lta Pi, said the KO 
members of her house have adopted pat- 
terns to deal with the amount of traffic 
on Anderson 

"It's bad. Sometimes you have to be 
patient," Oelker said "Wc pretty much 



walk together down Laramie and cross 
at 17th" 

Dclkcr said certain times of the day 
arc wi>rse than others. 

"At 3 and 5 it's already like New York 
City down there, and you want to avoid 
crossing Anderstin then." she said. 

Came Chilen. sophomore in sec- 
ondary education and member of Delta 
Delta Delta, said she has a Itt-minute 
walk to campus each morning. 

Longer crosswalk signals or working 
with the patlerns of tratTic would 
improve the situation for walkers, she 
said 

"[ think widening it would be a good 
idea I am usually in my car mon: than I 
am walking on Anderson, " t'hilen said 
"It can be so frustrating " 

Kye llinle. senior in electrical engi- 



neering and president of Beta Theta Pi, 
said members of his house have changed 
their dnving habits to accommodate the 
amount of traffic on Sunset and 
Anderson avenues. 

"We try to avoid dnvmg il Irke the 
plague If we're going lo Aggieville. we 
try to use Laramie and if we're going 
north toward campus we try lo cross 
Anderson rather than turn onto it," he 
said. "1 d like to see something done, but 
1 don't know if it's necessarily the best 
for pedestrians " 

Adding stoplights Ihal analyze and 
help the irafl'ic flow at the 
intersections of Denison and Sunset 
could help pedestrian and auto tratTic. 
he said, 

"The slop lights are bad" Hitilc said. 
"You almost always get stopped if you're 



in the center lane and if you're behind 
someone who wants lo turn left, you 
have lo wait through ;i couple light 
cycles" 

Hittle said traffic on the side streets 
lo the south of Anderson is just as dan- 
gerous because of parked cars and 
drivers using them lo avoid the conges- 
tion 

Crossing the street is sale when stu- 
dents wait for the lights, Hittle said, and 
crossing might become a problem with 
w ider roads 

"I've heard of people nearly getting 
hit with cars running a red light ur going 
through a yellow late." Iliille said, "The 
thing I worry alxiut is when yini'rc late 
and trying to make it across Anderson at 
the end of the signal. That can be dan- 
gerous" 



Proposal 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Richard Mcrt/, a supporter of the cit- 
izens' group and 11 1- year Anderson 
Avenue-area resideni. agreed more pre- 
caution.s should be made for pedestrians 

"Anderson is dangerous to walk 
down now," Mcrt/ said "It's only going 
lo gel worse " 

The city has made efforts to prwide 
for pedestrian safety. Muir said He said 
sidewalks will be widened for pedestri- 
ans and bicyclists, and that traffic cross- 
ing signals will be computerized result- 
ing m safer crossing conditions. 

"First you have tratTic do* Tlien you 
have pedestrian (low," Muif said. 

The steering committee also dis- 
cussed alternatives lo street-level cn»ss- 
walks. such as fly-<ner walkways and 
underground tunnels, but members 
determined that it was not feasible. Muir 
said The amount of utilities m the area 
would have made it difTicull lo increase 
the grade of the street for pedestrian tun- 
nels. 

"You can 'I fit Ihcm given the circum- 
stances," Muir said 

Messcr agreed tunnels were not fea- 



sible He said the number of homes and 
the commercial value of ihc property on 
the south side of Anderson Avenue 
would have increased the difficulty of 
the process 

MacFarland said the tunnel would be 
possible south of Nichols Hall if 
the onginal grade of the street were built 
up 

"If you restore that grade, you could 
easily put a tunnel under Anderson at 
that point." MacFarland said "And the 
rcastm to do a tunnel rather than a bridge 
IS because it's a very slight difference so 
far as the grade level is concerned for 
the people on bike, on fool and on 
Rolterblade " 

MacFarland said street -lev el cross- 
walks arc not in the best inicrcsi of 
pedestrians, nor do they protect pedes- 
trians He said pedestrians would not 
wait until crossing lights change 

"The pcdesirians and the bicyclisis 
and the Rollcrhiade people are going lo 
be stuck at the interwciion for longer 
periods of time." he said. "The tempta- 
tion to boll across the streei and not wail 
for the next time when the thing finally 
turns the walk light on is going to be too 
great." 

Mcrt7 said the expansion will not 



only pose dangers for pedestrians, but il 
also will have a detrimental died on the 
aesthetic quality of the Anderson 
Avenue corridor 

"1 think It lakes a tremendous ju.stifi- 
cation to cut down a mature tree, and I 
don't see ihc jusiificaiion." Men/ said 

MacFarland agreed that the removal 
of the IMll trees will diminish the area's 
beauty 

"When we are tearing down the 
urban forest that wc happen to have in 
this area and planitng what somebody 
else thinks are preferable species and 
more of ihcm, hut we knttw they have to 
be liny." MacFarland said. "You can 'I 
put huge trees on a llatbed truck and 
stick them back in the ground. It's not 
going lo happen." 

Although INO trees will be removed 
the city plans to replant 24((, Messer 
said A community garden will also be 
created on the comers of Sunset and 
Anderson avenues, he said 

The proposal will not only add com- 
munity gardens and new trees but also 
significant landscaping along the expan- 
sion. Messer said. 

"We're taking great pain in this pro- 
ject to ensure that we landscape this cor- 
ridor. The last thing wc want to do is cre- 



ate a scar that will never grow back," 
Messer said 

Muir said the only significant 
changes have been the length of a nghl- 
turn lane for northbiiund tralTic from 
Anderson to I km son avenues He said 
public comment has been sought 
throughout the prtKcss. 

"I think they've done a good job try- 
ing lo involve everyone that is going lo 
be alTeeted by this," he said. 

However, Mertz said the pro)c*cl has 
grown in dimension and the proposal 
was unclear 

"1 believe there's been a tot of infor- 
mation, but it seems lo have progressed" 
Men/ said. 

MacFarland agreed ihe scope of the 
project has increased since its inception 
He said the cfTccts of the project were 
unclear at the beginning of the process 

'*A lot of us were lulled into thinking 
that this was no big deal, that we were 
going to get a little widening, we were 
going to get left-turn arrows," he said 
"And we were believing the city when 
they said that v^e're going to preserve 
neighborh«HHls We're going to have as 
little impact as we possibly can on trees 
And then ii turns out those were outright 
lies" 



Technology 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 
won an NSF combined research and cur- 
riculum development grant of 
S42K,5'(4 uith a sub-grant of S169,6()5 
to K -State 

"The money was used for computers, 
summer salaries and to support graduate 



students who helped with the project." 
he said 

The project started in 1W5. taking 
the first year to work on I he course and 
putting it into action. The cou^^cs were 
to be taught for two years, ending in 
summer IWK 

The funding will end soon and 
Pahwa would like lo work out .something 
with other universities for this course to 



continue being taught 

"No one else in the US. leaches a 
class of this type." he said "It would be 
nice 10 write a bixik and make il avail- 
able to other people " 

Although a formal decision has not 
been made, Paliwa said the group would 
like to write a lexikiok for the course 

The class is taught in the (all semes- 
ter in Rathbone Hall. Pahwa said it was 



ihe only classroom available with Kith 
telephone and Internet hook-ups By 
using two adjoining labs, he is able lo 
hookup the necessary mubilc equipment 
bul must lake it down after each class 
period. 

"Il is a very time consuming 
process." Pahwa said "1 bojie in the 
future there will be more facilities avail- 
able for this kind of equipment." 



Salaries 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

"We established thai as a practice in 
Ihe late 'N(K because we wanted to set in 
molion a plan that would allow 
faculty a higher salary increase." 
(off man said. 

Howes cr, a higher- percentage salary 
increase is irrelevant when the average 
salary for faculty is as low as il is, Legg 
said. 

"tomparcd to our peer instilulions. 
our average salary is over 10 percent 
lower," Legg said "It's wotm: if we com- 



paa- to all land-grant universities or state 
universities" 

Salary increases haven't kepi up with 
the average Kansas income in the past 
two decades, he said Fvcn with a 25- 
pcrcenl or 3 5-peiceni annual merit 
raise, the faculty will fall further behind 

Dtlenhrimer .said he agreed. 

"If I remcmtier correctly, my equiva- 
lent salary ii less than it was 25 years 
ago." he said. 

ticneralty, many faculty members 
aren'l pleased when they compare their 
salary increases with other universities, 
he said. 

"I think they're unhappy that they're 



on the lower end of pay compared to 
peer institutions." Ottcnhcimer said 

One way to allcsiale the problem, he 
said would be to revamp faculty bene- 
fils 

"I think we could use a belter fringe- 
benefit program," (Hicnhcimer said 
"Kmart employees don't have to pay for 
their parking " 

For any kind ol significant change in 
faculty salaries. CofTman said, the 
Kansas Board of Regents would have In 
maximi/c the money appr^ipriated from 
the legislation. 

'We know thai faculty salaries arc 
not compclilive." he said. 




ont a crossword you con ride to? 
Get it online, 

collegian, ksu,edu 



PIZZA 

SHUHLE 

deliver: 

7755577 

vISOOCIafllnRoady 



Wall Street 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 
helped spark a rcvcrviil in the broad- 
er market, especially for bellwether 
issues 

Before the IBM aniHiuncement 
around Ml 3(1 a m., stocks had 
plunged alU't the (uurlh-siraiglit day 
of turmoil in .^sian and European 
(mane 111 I markets fhe Dow was 
down mote ihan I (HI p«iints, falling 
below 7,(HH1 lor the lirst time since 
May, and the Nasdaq comjiosite 
index was down 4-pcrccni 

"There were a lot of emotions 
running this market." said Barry 
Bermaii. head irader for Robert W 
Baud & to in Milw.iiikcc "IBM 
stepped in at ilic rit-'hi lime that it 
managed to irigger a turnaround" 

In addition, slocks got a lii) from 
a prnale rcp«irl puiiilmg lo a ciHiling 
olf of inlbtionan pressures. The 
(onfctciice Board said consumer 
conlidcncc in the economy fell 
sharply inOciober 

IS Treasury bmids lell Tuesday, 
erasing gains ('mm Monday when 
imesiurs bough! ihc highly liquid 
and secure investments as a haven 
for cash uhile they wailed out the 
lurbulence in stock markeU. Ihc 



decline in bond prices pushed the 
yield on the 3(J-year Treasury a 
key influence on borrowing costs — 
to h2K percent from 6.12 percent 
late Monday 

Advancing issues outnumbered 
dec liners by 1 1 lo K on the NewVbrk 
Stock t.xchangc. where volume 
totaled I I ^6 billion shares, lopping 
Ihe fiW.5t million-share record set 
ian. 23. In a revision, Monday's vol- 
ume. originally reported as a record 
was adjusted slightly downward to 
<iK4 57 million. 

In other strong showings, the 
Standard & PiKir's 5(H)-slock list rose 
44 2f. lo V21 25. Ihc NYSF compov 
ile indes rose l*J45 at 4K2ftfi and 
the American Slock Fxchange com- 
jHisile index rose '> Kfi lo h7().27 

Ihc \asdaq composite index 
rose h5 25 lo l.MKI .34, Kiosled by a 
strong rally m technology slocks, 
including IntcL Dell Computer and 
Microsoft. 

Beside IBM's upward charge, 
other slocks fueling Ihe Dow's 
rise included J P Morgan, up Sft 25 
10 M44 25, Iravclcrs, up S4.KI to 
SM SI. and Hoeing, up !i5 lo S4X 

Only four of the 31) Ikiw compi>- 
ncnts closed down Tuesday On 
Monday, all 3(1 of the Dow stocks 
fell- 



Kansas 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 

"It's natural lo gel iicrviius." Lewis 
said "Fven I gel a little excited 
about lhi>, liH)" 

Most Kansas businesses, includ- 
ing aircrall manufacturers duln'i 
seem nervous about ihc market's 
jumps 

"Wc have not tieiectcd a dampen- 
ing in ihc maikei cnihususm for our 
new aircrad " said Jim tiregory, a 
sptikcMiian for Rayllicun .Aircraft 
to, vkhich IS based in WichiUi. 

Orders (or planes are usually 
long-term decisions not allecled by 
day-to-ilay swings in ihc slock mar- 
ket, said Jan \U Inure, a vpokes- 
woman lur ( essna No one was can- 
celing orders Im pl.nio. ihc laid 

The agriculture iiidusiry is driven 
largely by supply and demand I he 
stock ma lid's plunge on Monday 
wasn't enough lo immediately affccl 



food sales, said William Tierney, 

professor of agncullural economics 
ai K-Statc Univcrsiiy If the mar- 
kti's drop turns out to be the Tirsi 
sign o( a sirting recession, then 
consumers could begin eating out 
less and buying cheaper fiMtd like 
chicken inslead of sleak. fierney 
said 

Farmers worry more about a late 
free/e or the price of fertilizer, said 
larlene Hill, direcior i>f ihc Center 
(or ! conomic Development at 
Wichiia Stale I niversily 

If the drop in Hong Kong and 
other Asian markets is a signal of a 
recession overseas, then I 'S. exports 
of oil seed products, feed grains, 
soyhean^ and wheat also could drop 
with demand On Tuesday. Hong 
Kong posicd it\ largest sellolT since 
l»»N4 

"Ihal IS such a long, drawn out 
siting of conclusions." Tierney said 
"It IS way too early to conclude any 
of thai" 



Peries 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 



his share of big caicltcs 

I asi week at Oktahoma, he had 
two clutch 

catches, unc I* « ~ 

(or .15 yards Th,> ., txh o bo yn. 

and one (or a ,^„^^d , ,h,„^^ 

gam ot 4(1 _ J, a....t 

f e«fy*if!Q fhoi hap. 

He a so had ■ ^ , i , 

r ,, SIM 10 me tiefe So ( 

one of K- •/, , ^ 

Slates most ' . ; 

memorable '^ 

catches when * . _ . 
• Gflvm Penes 



«>0€ rKeive" 



.•l<^ 



the Cah 
played Ohio 
on Sept 1.1 

During 
ihal play. 

quarterback Michael Itishop was 
(lushed (rom ihe pockei. rolled to 
Ihc right sideline then back to the 
led. avoiding ihicc sacki in ihe 
prtK'css He linally threw the ball 
about 61) yards downlield while 



being hil. where wide rcceiser 
l.vereii Huineti dcllcded Ihe pass 
and IVnes caught il while falling 
facc-firsl at Ohm's .'-yard line 

The play vkas one ol many this 
scaMMi m which Penes had to ad|ust 
to Bishop's scrambling abilities, 
tiiily to fight for breath once the 
whisilc blew But he said it's not a 
problem 

■"We kn<iw we ha^e lo be pre- 
fvared liir anything," Peries said of 
Bishop. "Vou never know what he 
can do He's capable of doing amaz- 
ing things" 

Not Ihal Irenes' catch wasn't 
.inia/ing If he didn'i come down 
with Ihc ball, ihat play would have 
been just another incomplete d«iwn- 
ficld p.iss 

Pkiys like that get Pcrie>' alien- 
lion attention he loves, consider- 
ing he's playing (or Ihe No 12 team 
m the country 

"This IS such a big university, and 
I cherish everything thai happens to 
me here," he said "So I try and keep 
a lillle scrapbook '" 



Electrical and Computer Engineerini 

Early Enrollment for SPRING 199« 

Check the bulletin board behind the EECE office (RA 261) for detent «ji loc lutfly Ehwill 
procedures. Early cnrollmcm will only be conducted: 

Seniors and juniors: thdrs. oct. n a fri. oc 

"all STUDENTS: M^ - --■■/■-■- '- -- , ];(Hj-f:.>,,pm 

■RV SESSIONS: F nm 






Leadership Studies Minor 

Devfloplnj{ Knuwlcdnciiblc rthlrnl. ciiriiifi. 
leaders for a illvfrst- world 
Infonnatlorial Meeting 
Thursday. October 30th 
4:00 p.m. 
Union 208 



Leader6hl|t Stuilies is 
a pro^nm In tl^e 
Denirtizient ol 
iucational 
Adj^lnstration 
Leadership, College of 
ation 



liitiiiin.iikiiial rit'sciilcd R_v; 

Df. Robert Shivp. Prolcssor of Educational Adminisiraiion and 

Leadership 

Dr. Susan M. Scott, .\ss<,viato t\-.in of student Life. DirsYtor 

of Leadership Smdics and Projy^atus 

.\,ND BY Sttulcnis currently Enrolled in the minor: 
Audrey .\bbott 
Marceila Burks 
lusiln Kastncr 
Ryan UuderMilk 
Leo PRIHTO 



Trilomwllciti. tull or stop by Ilir afl\t-r iil l^adrrahlp StiKlks utut 1'i^n.iniN. 206 llollon Unit. S32 6085 




I I 



1^1 



/ 



CoufGIAN 

DIRECTORY 




532^S556 
532-6560 
532-6555 








CONFUSED BY THE RULES OF LOVE? r^ 
THERE MIGHT BE AN ANSWER. 

^ T*ny W«kh conFe»se> )he fulet ol love moka hii ,.' 

mind go oil O'twiKer He ponderi ihii and the 
molfierrvotical sotufionj c 

See OPINION, Page 4 




ETC. 

ki today's popsr 

Briefs ., 2 

Spoftj .,,6 

In IIHIVWf I VW I popBT 

Meni B19 12 ba$ken)a]l 
preview 



'DEVIL'S ADVOCATE' NOT YOUR 
TYPICAL LEGAL THRILLER 



^ S}rroii Vbgtl reviews the new Al PoeifM film end 
lookt at his role ot the Prince of Dorkn«». 

See DrVERSIONS, Page 7 




OcT«E« 30. 1997 
THURSDAY 




HIGH 
LOW 

a west Mind fron> 
1 (Q JO mpK 
fcnijjW, [xirliy 
rloud^ ond cool 



Extra polling sites make spring elections technically invalid 



^OMdtoulotfr 



editor id board 
loundi off w 
Student Senote't 
•leclioiu 

Seefk)9e4 



TIUVIS D. UNKNIR 

»i.iir unltr 

A scveti-ycaf-i>id piece of Icgisbiitm has 
coine back to haunt members of K-Suic's 
Student Governing AsMxiation 

Bill 1W(IA7 estaNished polling places 
for SCiA cleciians. According to the bill, 
"The IWI, and thereafter. SGA Elections 
(shall I be held m the K-Slale Union and al 
the Veierinarv Medicine t'omplex" 

For al least the past I wo years, though. 
polling places have inekided buildm^s ihat 
hou.se individual academic colleycs and. for 
al tea^l one year, residence ball dmin^ een- 
lers. 



Those elections were technically invalid. 

Governmenial Relations Chair Patrick 
CartK'j. who bri>ught ihc error to the atten- 
tion of Student Senate a I last Thursday's 
meeting, said the addition of other, illegal 
polling place) was a mistake made when nes* 
regulations were writlen. 

"The habit has never been to go into past 
years' legislation and see what's been done," 
Carney said. 

This year, however. Studcni Senate eodi- 
Hcd imre than 20 years of legislation, com- 
hining It into one reference source that can be 
consulted. Legislation wasn't codified, 
though, for past yearti' elections. 



Carney said the IW<l hill could have bcvn 
repealed in two ways, bui neither was done 

"The imly way to change the polling 
places after bill 'Xl 37 was to spceificallj 
wnle a bill Ihat repealed *«) 37, or to make 
reference to additional polling places within 
new election regulations," Carney said. "But 
no other regulations with references to 
polling places have K'en passed since then" 

Appeals of election results may be filed 
within eight days following S(iA elections. 
Carney said No grievances were filed Mitb 
regard to polling places, which limits what 
can be done abmil the mistake. 

"It's a huge glaring error But is there any- 



thing we can do about if Probably m>t," he 
said 

Many within SGA. including faculty 
Representative to Senate Bill Muir. said they 
don't feel any action should be taken The 
error. Muir said, was a technical one 

"We might have something that a govern- 
ing group passed in WI4 that we're in viola- 
tion of It really gets into the ridiculousness 
of ihe whole thing." he said. 

"A bill was passed seven years ago (or 
polling places and then got lost in the slacks 
of legislation that we have," Muir said. "And 
then se\ en years later, it pops its head up and 
savs. Hello! Mow about this bill"' Whether 



that could msalidaic .1 whole system of elec- 
tions is ridiculous to consider" 

Agriculture Senator Bret (ticndcning 
agreed saying the addition of polling places 
didn't alTect the outcome of the elections and 
shouldn't he contested He said the addition 
of new polling places was put forward w ith 
giHtd intentions. 

"It's a leehnieality There are a lot of the 
accusations against Student Senate as being 
elitist .ind that we don't try to do anything to 
get studeni involvement." Cilendening said 
"It wasii t an intentional oversight of past leg- 
See ilfCTION, Page 10 



K> NOISO, 

proie^ioc ot 

Wajhinglon 

University in S) 

louii, speaks 

Wsdrwidoy nioht 

in Forum Hotrio 

iludents and orchi- 

iecls Noero is 

from Sooth Africa, 

and he talked 

obout the intensify 

in architecture ihot 

hoi been lost by 

the rest of the 

world 

IVANKOZM 

Coll^io'i 




Architect favors 
purpose in design 

►Jo Noero spoke about the state of architectural 
affairs and looked to o hopeful future Wednesday. 



■msiu FOflTMrrn 

The past two decades of main- 
stream architecture have given the 
public a vievi 

of architects as . 

maga/ine •* 

c e I e b r i 1 1 e s . The obsence I find 

eccentrics who here is thol 

spew forth orchitectu'e can 

ironic Willi- make o dilfeience 

cisnus and pro- in people's lives 
pose building 

schemes thai . i^^^ 

take convcn- ^ Mtto^n 

iional form and ^'^^"^1 <jnd prcfeiso. 

turn It upside aWoshingten 

dvwn """*^'y 

At least this *^ 

IS the picture 

thai architect Jo Noero, a professor at 
Uashingltm I'mversity in St Louis, 
painted to an audience of architects 
and students at a Iceture Wednesday 
night in Forum Hall 

NoCTO. a native of South Africa. 



siiid his couDtiy pr.ictices arclniccturc 
with an intensity that has K'en lo^1 in 
Ihe rest of the worUI and replaced vs ith 
cynicism in the Lnited States 

"The absence I find hett is that 
architecnire can make a ditTcrencc in 
people'^, livcv," Socro said "It's not 
aKiut bcmg j big deal, which is really 
a myth of tlic modern movement " 

(her I I 2 hours. Vicro none-ioo- 
subtly railed against such establish- 
ment architects and theoreticians as 
Philip Johnson, llenrv -Russell 
flitchcock and Peter fjscnman as hav- 
ing ruined architecture Noero said a 
mtnlesi agenda of ennching people's 
lives in a functional, purposeful man- 
ner IS no longer taught in IS and 
western Kuropean schiHiis 

Archileciurc. \ocro said "l^ an an 
hirne out of use. lis function is to 
serve a purpose " 

To enforce his own principles. 
NiKTo inirovluccd a bandlu! ol hts cvc- 
cuied designs in a -lide presentation 

SeeUROf, PogelO 



Consultants named for alumni center 



The architect and engineering 
consul tants for the planned alumni 
center south of Memorial Stadium 
were announced Wednesday 

Gosacn Livingston Associates 
Inc. and Profbsiitinal LngmecTing 
Consultants, PA., both of Wichita, 
were selected as the design firms for 
the project The Rrm*, who worl«ed 
as a team for the proposal, were 
Klectcd after an extenMve search 
and interview pt»cess. The local 
project architect will be Bruce 
McMillan Aiehitects. 

Bob Livingiilon. who was in 
Manhattan on Wednesday to view 
the rcsulu of the Bayer Stone 
Student Design Competition, said 
the project gives him the opportuni- 
ty to give back 10 hts alma mater. 



Livingston, who will operate as 
principal archttccl on the center, 
graduated from K -Slate in I'MtS. 

"I ihink this is an opportunity to 
do s*iincthing we really don't get lo 
do oficn," Livingston said. "Give 
back to the university ihat has treal- 
ed us so vwll " 

This year's design competition 
was an opportunity for fifth-year 
architecture students to design a 
proposal for the alumni center thai 
incorporated stone into the proiect. 

Living.ston said viewing the stu- 
dent projects allowed him 10 see 
small ideas and components that 
could trigger further investigation 
when his firm begins the deaign 
process. 

The alumni center is planned to 
be a two- to three -story. 45,000- 
square foot facility costing about $6 



million. It will be built on the 
extreme southwest corner of cam- 
pus 8l the comer of Anderstin and 
Den i son avenues. The project has 
moved forward since members of 
the kSU Alumni Association tM>ard 
of directors unanimously approved 
it in late September 

Amy Button Rcnz, president of 
the Alumni Association, said tlvc 
archtiecis hope to have schematic 
drawings by this spring. She said 
fiind raising for the protect should 
ticgin after Jan I 

Reru .said the next stage fur the 
Alumni Association is to work 
closely with the design companies 
in the design process, 

"They will meet with our v«lun- 
lecrs, stafT, university ofTiciala ami 
students to discuss the project," 
Renz said. 



Vitale to commentate Friglit Night II, 
kick off K- State basketball seasons 



UNDHV KMimfTR 

SUIT •fiiti 

The entire concourse in Rnimlagc 
Coliseum will be filled with ghosts 
and ghouls as Fright Night II opens its 
doors to stu- 
dents and the 
community 
Booths will 
provide enter- 
t a I n m e n I 
tonight as K- 
Slate showcas- 
es the basket- 
ball program 

Fright 
Night flit a 
variation of 
Midnight Madness, a kick-off preview 
for (be men's and women's basketball 
leaina. The NCAA dictates the official 
dqr, ailowiqg the teams to begin prac- 




Vitab 



iicmg 

This year. Fright Night features 
LSPN cnminenlalor Dick Vitak* 

"Dick Vitale is phenomenal He's a 
great ambassador for the sport of bas- 
il et ball," Cindy Fox. assistant athletic 
director at K-State. said 

In conjunction with Fright Night 
will be the first fall all-greek philan- 
thropy. 

Tliirty-fivc greek houses have 
signed up lo participate in booths for 
ihc event, as well as four residence 
halls and other businesses. The booths 
will include activities such as games, 
mask making, apple-bobbing and 
pumpkin colonng 

"The evening should put on a great 
show for the community and student 
body." Fox satd "bvcrylhing is free, 
and Ihe first thousand people receive a 
free T-shin" 



The men's and women's basketball 
teams will act in skits and scrimmage. 
Willie the Wildcat will open the 
evening with a special performance 

"Order of Dmcga will also have a 
food drive on the east and west sides 
of Bramlugc," Fox said "We had our 
best food drive ever last ycir". 

Merchandise from Dick Vitale can 
be purchased on the concourse. People 
will receive a free l997-f*8 College 
Basketball Preview magazine with 
any purcfiasc 

Although Fnghi Night does not 
t)egin until Kpm, the doors will open 
at 6J0 p m. for childa-n and commu- 
nity members to visit the booths 
around the concourse. 

"At least 5.00(t people ancndcd the 
event last year," Fox said. This year 
we should at least have ihat amount, or 
better We hope for a great crowd " 




JASON WAGNBI, 

senior m archileclure, 

wins first place in the 
Bayer Stone Studen) 
Oesigr> Compeiiiion 
wilfi o student desigri 
ol ihe plonned olumm 
center 
IVAN KOZAI 

Lolla^ion 



5th-year architecture students offer 
designs for planned alumni center 



iUSSIU FOKTMint 

Kansas limestone is a fiallmark of K- 
Statc buildings a unifying material 
giving the campus some coherence 

Students of fifth -year arc hitec lure 
design studios got the chance to develop 
a campus project, in this case ibe 
planned alumni center south of 
Memorial Stadium, specifically using 
stone as pan of the Bayer Stone Student 
Design tompetiiion. Bayer Sioiw of 
Manhattan sponsors ihe biennial com- 
petition as a way to increase designers' 
Bwarenc-ss of stone 

The winner of ihc competition, Jason 
W'agnci, propvtsed a somewhal disjoint- 
ed building, almost a scries of pavihons, 
above underground parking While it is 
no doubt a distinctly modem building, u 
subtly owes much to the traditional 
tower forms of the ftcavily rusticated 
limestone-clad Memorial Stadium 

"I wanted to mediate between old 
architecture and new architecture on 
campus," Wagner said 



Piercing the building, which encom- 
passes a ceniral courtyard and unifies 
the alumni center, is a large glass atn- 
um. Wagner said the glass element is 
partly to address the Kan)ada Inn across 
Anderson Avenue and to acl as a beacon 
(»)r V isiiors to the center. 

The site posed several tratTic and 
pedestrian challenges to the students 
Wagner's design opens its vanous eleva- 
tions with nmps and stairs punching 
through heavy walls to bring the circula- 
tion paths into the courtyard and to the 
glass beacon. 

"1 tried to fticus all the currents lo 
this piece." Wagner said 

Many of the same issues Wagner and 
other students have dealt with will now 
be passed along to Gossen Livingston 
Architects Inc of Wichita, who were 
recently awarded the contract for the 
alumni center. Perliaps the most notable 
diflcrencc between the students' work 
and what lies before Uossen is design 
freedom 

[)an Spircy, a jury member of the 



compel! lion and a Lincoln. Neb. -based 
arehitecl, praised the students' manipu- 
lation of forms, hut cniici/ed some of 
those projects lacking site specificity 
and context 

"In this case, 1 wonder what a lot of 
Ihe alumni's response would be to the 
designs." Spircy said 

TTie formal play in some of the pru- 
jecls lack precedent in Manhattan or al 
K-State for comparistm 

Jo Noero, .mother jury member and 
archilect and professi>r trom 
Washington Lmversity in St Louis, said 
the jury members asked ihemsclM-s 
what made each building's form say it 
was an alumni center 

"The successful ones, you could 
tell," Noero said. "TVic unsuccessful 
ones could be anywhere " 

There were two secoml- place win- 
ners. Miles Tolbert and Kimberly 
Murphy, and two third-place winners. 
Brent Crittenden and Oliver 

Sa« tAYfR STONE, Page 10 



DEADLINES 

TO PUCI AN rriM 

in the Daily Ptonnei, 

ihsp by Kcdzie 1 1 6 

and Fill out a form 

or MTKlil il to 

by 1 1 a.m. two doyj 
Mott it ii to run 




KANSAS STATE C OUEGI AN 



juttonr 




T H U 



NEWSrewind ^ . . ,, . , . .. 

Ne»r ffniiid I oiki (1 ifie fop compui. locot, rt*, notioflo/ and wona r»*s from tn« pcnl 48 hoof» Bfied ort tomaee 
from A I IB DfxJ itoS repot f J 



2 shidents critically wounded 
in Ohio university stabbing 

fAIRBORN, Ohig - Two studenit were itobbed 
tepfuiedf/ owtiide lfi« libtory on t(ie WrigKt State 
Univt^iMty campus and were hoipttoliied Wedne»^y 
m c'lticol condittofi. 

fhuy T Moi, 21, ond E»ic K Borten, 23, were 
attacked around midnight, bo4h blobbed sevefol times 
m the chwt, Wright Slote jpoteiman Bofry Johnwn 
said 

H oppeafs that the oiioiloni knew one of the vit- 
ttwii " he jaid 'It wos not a random act of violence " 

Johflson laid he didn't know why they weie 
attacked or what kind of weapon wot uied He said 
police ore seeking o mole suipect, who is not >tu- 
deni ot the jchool 

He declined to identify the hospital where the vic- 
tims were taken for securtty reosont 

Moi is o |unior mojof ing m monogement informo- 
tion systems at the 16,000-studenl school Borlen ii o 
senior majoring in biology Their honvetowns were not 
immediately available 

Wtighl Stale police gove no detoils, referring oil 
colls to Johnson 

Cat lost in Hurricone Bertha 
found in area animal hospital 

WILMINGTON, N C - Fifteen monflij hod 
possed since Hurricane Bertha ripped ashore ond 
Poijlette Tipton's cat, Tige<, disappeared 

Then she sow the classifieds "FOUND CAT 
Yellow and white, long hair, mole Found 10/23, 
beihel Road aieo. Coll TJeedham Animal fiospitol,'' 

Coold it possibly be? 

TipAHi telephrjried the hospital, drove ovei to have 
□ look and there he wos Tiger, long lost Tiger 

While making pieparaltons (w Hurricone Bertho, 
tlie family lost tiock of the cot They had (ust moved 
lu Wilmington, and Ttpton said she thought the unfo- 
malior suiioundtngs and the blasting winds of thai 
wmmer do/ in )996 might hove killed Tiger 

It tgrns out Tiger hod been |ust o few miles owoy 
the whole time, using his charm lo receive food from 
strangers 

A womon whose house he sought out in recent 



weeks had token htm lo the animol hospital, thinking 
he was belter off being put to sleep than homeless 
Mercihjity, the hospital ploced the od instead 

Tiger, 1 4, reclined on a plaid couch Tuesday 
ofternoon. nursing on infected bite wound on his 
head but otherwise oppeoring fit His future irovels 
will be limited 

Man jailed offer police mistake 
his vitamins for illegal drugs 

NORTH CHARLESTON, 5C - Fw six weeks, 
Malvin Marshall sot m |ail becouse pohce thought he 
was carrying heroin in hit pocket Police didn't 
believe htm when he said it was mushy vitomins 

On Monday, the charges were dropped Lob tests 
showed he was lellmg the truth 

The lubstonce was found in o smoll bog in the 
woteh pocket of Mar shell's pants when the 27-yeot- 
old man was taken to the hospital Sept 1 7 with on 
undisclosed illness 

"I didn't know it was there." Morsholl soid "The 
tablets were all mushy They hod been washed m the 
washing machine " 

Police performed a field test and concluded the 
substance was three groms of heroin But folbwup 
tests by the stote crime laborotory proved otherwise 

"The held test positives ore not foolproof," police 
It Melvin Cumbee soid 

The held test involves looking for color changes in 
on octd thot is opplted to the substance The test 
results con be affected by residue such as laundry 
detergent 




DAILYplanner 

Tht Daily Planntt ii the Cclkgion'i tonpuf bulkHn board 
uti/Kt ttomj in the phnnaf iray b* pMiiM up k> t^rae 
timai /leni] inoy no! oppacx iMCOvie of ipoce contiroift^ but 
ore guatonletd to t^ppeor on the day el the oc>ivit|r to ploce 
on itom. itop by Kadzm I >6 and liS ovl o lam or »mai/ it lo 
coHegnOlsu edu by ' ' am l^*o doyi btfere it it to run 



■the Onxtuote Schoet hos scheduled the final oral 
defense ol the doctoral diuertation ol Xiuihen lu lor 
to 30 o m today m Shdlenbeigef 204S 

*1tie Orodwale Scbeal hoi scheduled the final orol 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of M Poyne lor I 30 
p m today m Witws 3G 

*1he Dhrition ol liolagy wiil present Df ChotlM 
Cintron at 4 p m today in Acken 221 

•Pre-Vef Club will meet at 5 30 tonight outside Vkkmi 

•■etarott Club wilt meer ot S 30 Kwitght m Union 207 

•K-State Heraeflian'* AiMciotien will meet at 6 30 
lonight in Wet*' 1 46 

•Allan American Smdent Union will meet ot 8 tonight 
in Union 203 

•SAMbnt Cancer leioafdi Awordi ol 1500 are avail- 
abie for unde'groduoie Students in o heaMnelated 
degree Appiicationi, ttow ovaibbl* in Ackert 413. are 
dve by 0«c 8 







• El«ciion dt rtvited «lK1ior) r«9uliinont 

• Oupproaol ol Joml Comniittet on Olhcot 

• Dtolian of Stwknt Semli Ad Hoc Co mm ie w on librtry wbtcripkoni 



POUCEblotfer 

IFeporl^ ora tolen ivtcif kom Iht KS<&t and tiltjf CoviUjf poliC* 
dsporfrrwiti doity log) li^ do not frit wheel locki or minor traSrc 
vio/otioni because at spare cooilroints 

KSTATI 

WiDNiSOAY, Octabw^ 29 

*At 1 00 a.m., o bicycle was stolen from the west side of 
Seaton Hall The volue was estimated at $500, 



RILEYcouNTY 

TUEDSOAY, OctabM^ II 

•At 3 22 p m , Nathon P Abbott, 1739 Foirchild Ave , wos 
issued o notice to oppeor for (»ssession ol tobocco. 

•At 3:40 pm , David Reovis, 2420 Hobbt Drive, was orresf- 
•d on o ttiley County warrant for forgery Bond wos set at 
$1,500 

•At 4:24 p m., Scott M. Strope, Fort Riley. Kon , wos arrested 
on a Riley County worront for foilure lo appear Bond wos set 
at $1,000 

•At 6:33 p m., Kelly Ryder Roy, St George. Kan , wos arrest- 
ed on o Riley County woriont for failure to oppeor &ond wov 
set at $1,500 

•At 9 27 p m . Jock Breti, Womego, Kon . was orrested for a 
probation violalion (febny QUI). Bond woi set ot $1,000. 

•At 10:07 p m . Oarrell S Hill, Junction City, Kon , was arrest- 
ed lor worthless checks Elond was set at $150 

WEDNESDAY, OctolMr 29 

•At I 16 m , Thad Ryon Eyior, 430 Hoymoker Hall, wos 
arrested for DUI Bortd wos set Ot $500 

•At 1 1:14 am . Chorles F Smith wos orrested on two Riley 
County warrants for foilure lo appear Bond was set ot 
$3,500. 



imfi8Sii 



IONS 

Sometimes rhe Cdlegion moires o miitoke IF a miiKile occurs, conlDct Jill 
Slorir, monoging editor, by phone {532'6556|. by emoil 
coIhgnOtu/ edu or by slopping by the Cotlegion oi Kedzie 1 16 



M^ 




162° 
itmiO' 

TOMT 

fartly cloudy 
with o wtil 

wind from 10 
to 20 mph. 

Tonight, partly 

cloudy ond 

cool 

TOMOWMW 

Portly cbudy 

wilft high of 

65 

lY PHONE 

Newsroom 
S32-4SS6 

ADvf»nsit<i 
S32-49M 

Cwsstfios 

lYEHMAN. 

COUfGf^UU.fW 

■YMAtt. 

Kansas StAii 

COtlfGWN 

Ked» 1 16 

Kansas Stat[ 

l>«vHSirr 

MANHATtAN, KS 

66506 

IN PERSON 

Trt CotifijiAiN 

t4w900Mgm 

Kton 116 

\MJOii FIOAK 

nt K-S«Tt 
SiukntUnic^ 



Dm KofiM* Stot* C o Mojian IU5PS W 0201. a student newspoper ai Kansas Slate OnrveisiV n published by Student Publications ItK , Kedzie 103, MonhotlQn, Kon 66506 The CoKegion i$ pubbshed wvekdoys during the school yeor and twice o week through the summer 
PAnodMTCil postage <% paid at ^Vjnholton Kan. 6650? fOS1MAST[lt. Send addr^ changes to Konsos Stole Collegian, clicubion desk. Kedz« 103. Atenholton. Kcm 66506-71 67 C KM^SAi 5t«ff CoiiGuf^. IQ97 



You mleeed the ^an\eto work the conceeelon etand. 

You spent your Saturday cleaning the highway. 

You studied hard to make that honorary. 

Get Recognizedl 

More than 250 organizations inal<e K-Stftte qreaU 
Make sure your group is in tine 1998 Royal Purple 




These organizations are scheduled 
to have their pictures taken on 

Friday, October 31 



Organizations can still sign up for 

group pictures in Kedzie Hall 105. 

There is a $15 charge for each 30 people. 



Pictures will be t.ikeii in McCain 324. 
The Royal Purple ye.irbook i;iii be purchased .it this time for $24.95. 

Schedule an appointment for your organization in 103 Kedzie for $15. 
You can also qet a sound byte for the CP-KOM supplemetit for $5. 




<!ant3ct th«r Kciya) i'urplv at: 
Ktl Krd7tc HjII 

(7SS> S.'VZ'fiS'i?. rpfektiicdu 
http://w«fw.ipub.lwu.edu/'»p/ 



9^ 

Xroygl 
rniirtMf 



putpfe 



RAMAIM 

PLAZA HOTEL 



♦ 



rtpmCralt 



% 



3rd ANNUAL 

KSU 



BUL 
November 




Op.m 



Advaif^t^cket^tMlult $8.00 / $10.00 Door 
Children $5.00 / A^jgance $4^^ ■ under 5 Free 






TLETS 



MenfMllBi'i ■ S 9tf <i WMtem Ctotfii 

■VOTBrn VvV 

ftoam134 
KM tkMlMit umon BooKMor* MtHtf • RMeto WMlem Wmt 



iBpSB >Vtand#rblirs 

Roy Frey WMt#m Ww 



CounoH Orev* • Colby We tl em Woar 

JunctfowCiiy-iiobff w it H mOMWmw SMna - ^wtMHw CuMom Boot* • SadtNoo 

Cottomvootf fMt ■ Jim BeM 




Old 
Milwaukee. 



.\)H K 

mWARDS 



For Mof« Ifi ten TMrtlo n C«N: 
Stov* Frul«r (01 3) S3»4Sa6 



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14 



,* '- 



THU«ID«Y, OCTOHR JO, 1OT7 



KANSAS STATE COUIOIAN 



Almost 850 motorists fmed 
in K-177 construction zone 



TONYA AUOWAT 

Heather Reed, junior in clemeniary 
education, was dnving through the con- 
struction zone on Kansas Highway 177 
in May when she saw the "Give 'Em A 
Brake" sign. 

Fines double in worii zones, it read. 
She slowed down a little, but because 
she was late for an appointmeni, she jusi 
said a quick prayer and kept on going 

Ten minutes later and SB I poorer, 
Reed was pulling back on to the high- 
way, wishing she had paid a little more 
attention to the sign. 

Reed isn't alone. Almost 8 SO 
motorists were given similar ciutions 
throughout the construction of Kansas 
Highway 1 77, and another 248 received 
warnings. The citations are a way for the 
Kansas Itighway Patrol to control the 
number of accidents in work zones, 
John Eichkorn, trooper and public 
information offiecr, said. 

"We do try lo concentrate our time in 
sites where construction is being done," 
he said. "Workers have been struck and 
even killed because drivers aren't obey- 
ing the law " 

l:iehkom said it isn't a reflection on 
the drivers on the highway, but more a 
reflection that more cars arc being dri- 
ven in the area He said Kansas 
Highway 177 was under construction 
because of (he amount of traffic and 
number of accidents on the road. 



"11% one of the main arteries into 

Manhattan from the interstate." he said. 
"That's one of the main reasons ii was 
upgraded from a two- lane to a four- 
lane." 

Eichkom said as long as there arc 
human beings, citations will exist. 

"Humans arc late to work, to doctor 
appointments, or plain in a hurry." he 
said "As long as you have rhem dnving 
through these zones, they will need 
someone to monitor these zones." 

He said the fact that Kansas 
Highway 1 77 is right off the interstate 
isn't an excuse, even though it is heard a 
lot. 

"That might be one reason for the 
citations," Eichkom said 

The idea of the "Give 'Em A Brake" 
program, which began m IW, is to 
make drivers more cautious in work 
zones. 

Reed said although she had been 
given two warnings, she continued to 
speed However, after she received the 
citation, her attitude changed a little. 

"1 was more cautious afterward, def- 
initely when I saw work areas, but 1 still 
speed." she said "The warnings didn't 
stop me from speeding. Thai's why I got 
the ticket " 

Reed said she respects the work zone 
program more now. 

"It's got a purpose," she said 
"People will do what they want and pay 
no attention to speed limits, and then 



UPC sponsors children 's carnival 
to celebrate Halloween with safety 



UNCUT FOKTMirn 

Thef«^ something spooky lurking 
within the walls of the K-State Student 
Union. Tonight the Union Program 
Council will have its annual Children's 
Carnival, 

"The carnival gives the children of 
Manhattan and students with children ai 
K- Slate the opportunity to have fun in a 
safe and friendly atmosphere," Mike 
Hodgson, senior in English and presi- 
dent of L'PC, said 

The activities for children include 
games, candy and prizes. Booths will be 
set up for pumpkin decorating, basket- 
ball-hoop games and other carnival-style 



events, 

"Last year we had around 6(X) atten- 
dants, but this year we've handed out 
flyers to children, posted events in bul- 
letins and targeted our publicity around 
oflT-eampus community and children to 
bring in a more nontradiiional crowd" 
Hodgson said. 

UPC Feature Films and 
Kaleidoscope Films committees will 
also be showing "The Rocky Horror 
Picture Show" at midnight Friday and 
Saturday in the Main Ballroom 

A costume is not required at any 
event The Children's Carnival is from 4 
to 9 tonight in the Main Ballroom. 
Events are free to the public. 



r 



find fhi-' mconing of life. 
(th«ie'i news, too.) 



collegian.ksu.edu 



FRtHAY 

^^ CA5H PRIZES 
V S GIVEAWAYS FOR 
BESl HALLOWEEN 
COSTUMES 

DANCE 10 FOOLISH PLEASURE FRIOAy AND SATUROAy 




CHUCK MARTIN, 

asjocio<e profeisor of 
gBography. wos 
recently noffl«d the 
inferim head of the 
Deparfment o( 
Geography 

ItANDONWxm 



Geography interim head maintains 
vision for strong teaching department 



CATHY MCM 

A cardboard figure leans apinst the muII by a file 
cabinet in t huck Martrn's offtcc .Ground its neck is 
a red tic and clasped m its right hand is an empty beer 
can. On the back arc messages \vnMcn to Manifi by co!- 
leagucH ard siudcrts belbn* he went to (icrmany to con- 
diiti research on heavy metals in nvcr systems 

Jokes such as, "Who's ihis guy'.'" and "I thought 
he'd be taller." come from colleagues to remimJ 
Martin he was missed while researching in Germany. 

"They said he was put in my chair at staff meet- 
ings." Martin said with a grin on his face. 

Chuck Manin. asstwiate professor and mtenm 
headof the Deparimem of Geography, said he applied 
for the full-time position because he has the qualifi- 
cations for It. 

"I think 1 work well with them (the depanmeni 
St a IT) I respect them and 1 think they respect me. and 
that's important lo be able to work with people of 
diverse backgrounds and diverse opinions," Martin 
said "I think 1 have a strong vision of the department 
retaining its historical roots and maintaining a very 
strong leaching deparimcni." 

.\s a freshman at Dartmouth tollegc m New 
Hampshire. Martin wanted lo be a historian but then 
decided he prclerrcd to be outside. 

"At some point. I decided that I liked being out in 
the field.* MttHtn latd. "Prt>btiWy m my lirsi or sec- 
ond semester. I realized that I liked to be outside, that 



I liked to be out in the field, observing, taking mea- 
surements and collecting samples " 

Martin said the only options for him were geolo- 
gy or geography He said he decided geography had 
more human contact 

"I ended up in geography probably because 1 liked 
the fact that as a gengrapher I could deal with human 
activities and human impact, but also 1 can deal with 
the physical world" he said. 

Martin decided he uould leach after attending a 
semester of graduate school at the University of 
Kansas. He said leaching is still exciting for him. 

"It's still exciting to go teach a course, give a lec- 
ture, even if I've done it eight or 10 times before for 
a particular class, it's fun to go in and do it," Martin 
said. "There are butterflies the first day of the semes- 
ter, still " 

In fact, one of the more difficult decisions Martin 
said he made was becoming interim head, because it 
means he will focus less on leaching 

"Teaching is always what I've loved to do, and it's 
what really attracted me to academia in the first 
place." he said 

Karen DuBres. associate professor of geography, 
said Martin is one of the best teachers in the department 

"He is CKtrcmcly efTicient and well organized." 
DuBres said. "He often wins teaching awards and has 
brought a lot of students mto geography Students 
respond to his open personality " 

I'.ric l.iggatt-Purr, graduate student in gcogniphy, 



said Martin keeps siu Jenis' attention in class, and hit 
classes are inlcrestmg 

"He's an excellent professor," Liggait-Parr said. "I 
learned a lot about my teaching style ironi him" 

Dulires siiid four years ago she .imi Martin orga- 
nized a road raltv for graduate siudcnts. fiiculty and 
geography majors l.ach team wus given a set of clues 
to get them to the finishing point, along w iih nues- 
tions to answer along the way, 

"It's kind of fun." Manin said. "Il gets the grad 
siudcnts together as well as some of the undergrads." 

Martin was named a Teacher- Scholar of the 
Association of American Geographers in I W4 and 
IWfj He also received the College of Arts and 
Sciences* William L Stamey Teaching Award in I Wl 
and m3. 

Martin serves as ihe graduate progran^ coordina- 
tor fot geography. i\ a member ol the course and cur- 
riculum committee, the National Resource and 
Env ironmcntal Sciences and the planning committee 
for ihe annual Water and Future of Kansas 
Conference 

Martin received his bachelor'^ degree from 
Dartmouth tollegc and his ma-sters and doctoral 
degrees (nim Ihe University of Kansas. 

Martin's area of interest is rivers. He received a 
fellowship from ihe Alexander von Humboldt 
Foundation of (iermany in 1W4 and researched and 
published ihe elk-cis of heavy meial ••cdiments in 
rivers. 



^aZ^ 


Joyce's 


l^^^^l 


Hair Tamers 


C^j 


Ycnt w«nrt Uv S|'(KlKi;i) 
l»y oia jiri( t*s. 




fa Perms 

Sale $30-$38 

inc lucks { til ^f style 

Hciil nils $17 


m 


^ liYlU 1 iitllr t nils ISlvd. 



KEYS TO yOGR 



HmEMIC SUCCESl 

Memory 



i 



Motivation 

Self-Confidence 

Overcoming Test Anxiety 

0^-» Study Strategies 

I Managing Stress & Time 

I Learning How to Learn 

Free introduction and orientation meeting. 



Whvre: Union Stat« Room 1 
When: Monday. Nov. 3, 1-2 p.m. 



Look For These Upcoming UPC Events! 



IChiloren's Carnival a ■■ *# Off ration CsiL^fiB 

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KANSAS STATE COUEGIAN 



OPt«ONEDflO« 
MUWMHWm 




OURview 

Our Vitw, art editorial 
i«l«cied and debotad 
by rt» editonol boord, 
li written after o 
majority opinion is 
fotmed. The editariat 
board consists of 
Collegiarv editors ond 
other staff members. 
Our view is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 



Student Senate should be held accountable for past legislation 



Think back to last year's studtni 
body elL>ctions and tlu: elccliun 
two ycani ago. 

Both have somelhing in common 
Both were conducted without regard to 
existing procedural legislation. Sluduni 
Senate, specifically the Elections 
Committee, was in error. Student senators 
Merc not aware of and did not follow the 
laws their predecessoni instituted. 

In I WO, Student Senate pa.ssed a hill that 
stated election polls were to be in the K- 
State Student Union and the Veterinary 



Medicine Complci only. 

The past two years, polling litations have 
been in individual ucadcniii' colleges Last 
year, pt>lling stations were also in dining 
tenters. 

Killing locations weren't the only mis- 
take made in last year's elections. A polling 
sialion in Kramer FikhI Center closed about 
.10 minutes early 

Had the legal guidelines been adhered to. 
the elcctHin results might have K'on diflcr- 
cni Regardless of the intent of the iiKTcase 
in polling locations, the fact remains that the 



elections were conducted improperly 

Senate needs to he held accountable. It is 
severely inappropriate for Senate to sweep 
its mistakes under the legislative carpet. 

Senate has prtKcdures to follow, for 
everything from conducting meetings to 
enacting laws Those procedures are institut- 
ed for A reason 

When some laws are enforced and some 
arc not, it sets a fnghtening pa*ee<knt There 
seems to he a double standard to laws that 
only alTcci senators. 



If student senators ignore or do not refer 
to their own laws, the "elitist " stigma that is 
sometimes attached to SUA is reinforced 

Mistakes are going to happen were 
all human. But Senators must make every 
cITort to avoid breaking laws Consequences 
to Senate mistakes affect every student on 
this campus. 

And if Senate is going to follow the "let- 
ter of the law," as Senate leadership says it 
must do, then it is imperative that they first 
know what their own laws say. 



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Relationships smerlation^^ 

Dules of lovin' too hard to live tfo^ 



A In end of mine recently gave me this equation 
to figure out the youngest-aged pcrwn you 
can date and remain respectable, halve your 
age and add seven. 

Being a returning "adult" student. I needed some- 
thing like this. 

I'm not sure where this equation came from, and 1 
don't think it can be justificti but I really have no inten- 
tion of trying to do so I simply mention this because I 
ihink It would make things easier if there were more 
ruks like that aNiul relationships, hard and fast rules 
that could be figured on a calculator. Because, frankly, 
I 'm Inst 

Helorc \*e get into the meal of the topic, let me say 
that I am highly ambivalent about writing a column con- 
cerning relationships I am not an expert in this area. 
Ilnlike most Ntudcnts here, I have dcKumentation from 
thi' I'ratl ( ounty Courthouse in Pratt, Kan., to back up 
iusi how much expertise 1 lack 

In case that's not enough to convince you. just stop 
my ex-wife on campus sometime and ask her. She's the 
line mumbtinj! to herself about kitchen cabinet doors 
being lell open I Befoa' I receive a subpoena, I should 
point out that my ex is actually a wonderlul, lovely p^f- 
son and remains a dear friend, even though it takes a 
certain alignment of the planets tor us to show it). 

Mv ignorance on the topic firmly stated, let's begin. 
^hall we' 

I think most of our problems with relationships 

V lime Irotii the fact that at about age 1 1) we are given 

the talk," and then Hollywood fills tnall the prc-coital, 

|vrcmantal adult situations but then, we're on our 

own. No one ever siLs down and wants to talk about 



what cofTKs after that, the period that someone once 
called "The Big fade" 

Hollywrnxl has some great ways around this topic. 
Consider "Casablanca." in which the perfect guy is the 
one she leaves. ( onsider "Hie Bridges of Madistm 
County," in which ihc perfect guy is the one who leaves. 
Consider "Phenomenon," in which the perfect guy is the 
one who dies Maybe what they're saying m these 
movies, which are geared 
toward a det'imic female 
demographic, is not, "How 
sad that these pcrlect men 
had to leave." but rather. 
"Ihese men arc perfect 
bccaUM' ihev left "" 

If llsa and Kick had leH 
( iisablanca for point* 
west, settled dow n in some 
ugly posi-ttar iraci hous- 
ing, gotten chubby, raised 
kids and taken up bowling. 
It might seem ui must pco- 
• pie that the sheen had been 

taken ofT their romance. 

Another thinji tliat gets me is when people end up 
tttgelher in a muvte's dciioucnicni when they've been 
fighting each other tiHith and itail thriHtghout .'\rc we 
supposed to simply accept their relationship as valid' I 
did most of my life 1 blame Spencer Tracy and 
Katherine Mepbuni lor mv failed aitempt at dating a 
Republican 

I know It sounds like I'm just bitching at this point, 
but can I really be the only person with these problems.' 




ntttr Wtl£H ii a luniat m 

rodio/TV foti i:on wnd ^ov tfnol 



I think not. 

(iood people of the jury. I would like to admit 
into ev idcnce article \: studies un the rising phe- 
nomenon ot Internet -based relationshtps If it 
pleases the court, may 1 ptCH'nl article B person- 
al ads from primar> newspapers from acn>ss the 
t nited States 

\^'c all search for romance in our own way, and 
It seems very few of us really know what oth- 
ers want Some are even more incapable of 
understanding what they themselves want 
and need, because we've K'cn taught that 
certain things are what make up romance 

Ime IS all it takes, omnia vincil amor, 
etc 

But delve into that personals section 
once and you will led the insincerity, the 
unwntlen question in each letter, "Is this what 
you want'" I mean, come on Are there really that 
many people who vvani to take long walks on the 
beach* Does everyone else in the world really love to 
go dancing, or is that just supposed to ring some bells'' 

When II comes down to it. I can onlv olfer more 
questions 1 don't really understand how things are sup- 
pttsed to work anvmore tand 1 just don't seem to have 
the energy to figure it out .it this p<nni in my litel There 
are ver\ tew strict rules governing relationships, 
and none of them arc written down. As a friend ol 
mine told me the other day. you usually only learn 
the rules once you've broken one 

I would like to recommend, however, that you 
ahv'ays shut the kitchen cabinets. 





Sharpen your interview skills 

You will need them 

RECRUITERS TRY TO FIND EXCUSES NOT TO HIRE YOU 




AN 

MWiO KHAN » a g<«Axi«i »V 
dtnl if* lAmittctjf vnginHTinQ rou 
ron itAd t-tnaA Ic Mofvd 01 



Intervicv^ skills were once some- 
thing you had to master to land that 
first job (Hit of school, and then per- 
haps dust otTunce or twice again over 
the next few decades if you changed 
employers. 

Career options, employer expecta- 
tions and economic conditions now 
mean that people are looking for 
work or s-witchmg jobs more ot\cn. 
forcing them back into the interview 
arena an frequently as every few 
ycarii 

At the same time, the target has 
become a moving mark being 
interviewed in the iy9(>s is no longer 
just a formal 20-minute exchange 
about education, experience and 
whcre-do-you-scc-yoursclf-in-fivc- 
years sort of thing 

Now the interview process can 
start online, by phone or fax It can 
progreiis to a face-to- face meeting 
with a recruiter who a.sks pruhing 
behavioral questions to get you to 
describe how you've handled yourself 
in the past 

It can move to a panel interview 
with the managers and colleagues 
you'd actually be working with and 
who might have final say over 
whether you join their team. 

So ortcc you've created a fabulous 
electronic risumi, networked through 
e-mail with colleagues in your field 
and culled all the great offers from 
online job banks, you're still facing 
the traditional big hurdle in the career 
hunt the interview. 

Most people dread job interviews 
moiv ihu) any other part of the search 



for work. Career counselors fliKid stu- 
dents with common-sense articles 
and reports Research the company. 
prcpiire your answers, dress properly 
and take control of the conversation 

An interview is, essentially, a sales 
meeting where the product you are 
pushing is yourself 

I remember myself being asked 
once by an interviewer. "Are you mar- 
ketable'* Although his remark made 
me feel like a fresh vegetable in the 
market, I felt great 

The economy was gmid, and the 
city I was interviewing m had a job- 
less rate less than 4 7 percent for that 
quarter. 

Some sec interviews as their 
chance to unearth whatevet disquali- 
fies you. Those mtcrsiewers arc like- 
ly to rely on standard "lough ques- 
tions" in their effort to figure you out. 

Think about these potential ques- 
tions before the interview; 

• "Tell me about yourwif." 

• "What are your weaknesses?" 

• "What arc your stmng points?" 

• "How do you think you'll fit in 
best •" 

• "What kinds of people rub you the 
wrung way?" 

• "Why dtd you leave your last 
job'.'*' 

My nunterous interview expen- 
enees have utughl me that interview- 
ers ane now relying on a technique 
that piychologists fcigan perfecting in 
the early l«>80s - the behavioral 
mtervicw. The idea was to turn the 



interview im its head make it 
active rather ihan passive 

So the interviewers question went 
from "Tell me how you would ensure 
our customerrt are happy" to "Ciive 
me an example of a time when a 
client of yours tried to cancel an order 
and describe what you did to save the 
project ' 

Interviewers like these questions 
because what you've done in the past 
lells them the most about what you're 
likely to do in the future Job aj^li- 
canis hate them for obv lous reasons. 

If you're not prepared for this 
behavioral approach, you can frec/e in 
the interview If you are prepared 
you'll walk a delicate line in phrasing 
and presenting your ansv>crs in the best 
possible, but still honest, light 

.\nswering these intrusive ques- 
tions aren't usually enough to really 
please the toughest interviewer or to 
outshine the fiercest competition. 

Show, don't tell, seems to be the 
rule of thumb for these recruiters. 
They want to hear about a candidate's 
experiences in thoughtful, descrip- 
tive, even entertaining detail. 

Recruiters during mtervicws also 
register information about you tm a 
second level It begins with the phys- 
ical impresiiion you make: your voice, 
body language, eye contact, expres- 
sions. It includes your attitude arid 
whether you hit it off with the inter- 
viewer, your enthusiasm and your 
self-confidence. 

You'll need to retiearch the busi- 
ness so you can talk ab«>ut a spec i Tic 
department or §cvcral areas, depend- 



ing on the job opening Ytvur an.swers 
should show you know a department 
might be expanding or the company 
IS adding new clients You should 
demonstrate interest in the company 
beyond a regular paycheck 

Know when to keep your mouth 
shut. tiHv An interviewer who asks 
about your weaknesses and then sits 
back in silence might be waiting to 
see if you prattle on unnecessarily. 

Tell them instead about a couple 
of carefully chosen characteristics 
you feel you can improve but are not 
crucial to your job performance Then 
watt quietly for the next question. 

The hardest question might be the 
request to describe yourself For this 
prt of the interview, it's best to have 
a short, prepared monologue about 
your successful work history, projects 
that interest you and ways you have 
met and overcome challenges in the 
past. 

Make your tone conversatiiwial 
Imagine yourself descnbing the same 
accomplishments to a new acquain- 
tajKC over dinner 

Of course, as much as technology 
and the economy change the inter- 
view pnxess. S4imc things remain the 
game AlwajK send a thank -you note 
after the interview. 

And if you don't get the job, call 
the interviewer and ask why Let them 
know you are ready to improve and 
you want to stay in touch 

If nothing else, Ihc interviewer 
might then become a part of your net- 
vM>rking web 



READERSwrite 

'Lynch Mo^' not mMint to 1m 
offensive nicknome for team 

Edilor. 

1 am writing in response to Scott McKJtmey'^ 
letter on Tuesday regarding iK' negative eonnott- 
tkms of the nickname "Lynch Mob " 

In his letter, McKinney slates the Wildcat 
defense has been given an irtappropnate nickname 
because it is in reference to tbc hunting down of 
African- Americans. 1 think he makes a noteworthy 
point, and I appreciate his point of view. 

However, it is my untknianding the defense 
itself canK up with this nickitame. not the media 
or students In fact, ii is my understanding that dte 
nickname has been around for a few years If this 
is in fact true, I would hasten tti say the members 
of the footltall team did not intend to offend any- 
one with the nickname 

FVrsonally, when I heiird the nicknanK, 1 pic- 
tured a |)os9C in a western movie going after • 
cnminal, much like the way out defense swarmi 
around opposing running backs. 

McKinney is nghi, though. Our defense is 
great and deserves a great nickname If individu- 
als arc offended by the nickname, perhaps wt 
dHHild find a belter one. 

Larry Bunce 

graduate student in psychology 

Stu^nt fMrtkigants make fcrir 
poiittve view of K-State 

Editor. 

Wc wiHild like to extend our heartfelt thanks to 
all students who provided volunteer time at the 
Health Profentonal School Fair on Oct 23. 
We'd especially like to thank Amber Smiet, wfao 
coordinated the volunteer worken; Kim 
VanMeter, who created the bulletin board in the K- 
State Student Umon; and Mclanie tamhart, who 
ereaied three promotional poslen 

The Fair puiicipmts nwk glowing commeaii 
about the courtesy and hetpfiiliini (tf ow itiMnifc 
It it very nice for cimfNii visjion lo luive ntl ■ 
pootive view of our students and K-SUe. 

ThHki agiin to all who were wttlm| to voh»- 



iWui 
iGofmely 

HmMi PraAniem A(tviicr« 







THUKSDW, OCTOBIK 30, 1997 



KANSAS STATf COLLIGIAN 



PAUL MAU- 

NA, profession' 

a\ rollerbloder 

from Australki, 

performs 

maneuver J (or 

K-Stale studenH 

Wednesday 

oflernoon in (he 

free ipeecfi 

zone Ma lino 

was there with 

three other 

profess ionat 

rotleriilaciers 

curnuMHRo 

C ollegign 




Cats for Cans begins annual food drive 



OAIL HONG, 

juniof in horticullufe, 

slops a hockey puck 

in at the Slop shot 

Chollenge 

Wednesdoy 

ofternoon in the 

free speech ;one 

Wolef bottles, hols 

and toundry bogs 

were given to 

participants who 

mode goob 

NKK HftUMf 

Cdhegiion 




ANGIU UKCKMOSSI 

Scvcniccn traicmiiy and MJTOrily 
htiusciiititliL-rs were "kidnapped" lati; 
Monday c\cnii)^ and held lor run.suni. 
The pnee for their freedom went to 
help Rtley CminiyV hunjjry fLitiiilics 

Till- kidnapping. sptmM)rcd hy ihu 
l.atnhda ( hi Alpha fraternity, was one 
i>f the llrst fund nlsen fur the t'als for 
t atis food drive. 

The housemothers ^vcre kidnapped 
and liikcn by limousine hack to the 
lambda (hi house for an evening of 
fun and sixiali/inj! Fraternily and 
sorority menthers then paid a %4ti ran- 
som to have their housemoiher safely 
returned home The e^ent earned SfiKD 
to he yivcn to the himt Hills 
llrt-adhasket. 

The Cats for Cans food drive is the 
university- wide food collection that 
helps the Breadbasket feed thousands 
of Rite> County residents during the 
holitby wason. 

"'Basically, it prt>v ides most of the 
food for their Thanksgiving and 
Christmas food baskets," Emily 
Hmerson. tats for Cans chairman, 
said 

The program started in fall Wi 
and was onginally called the .11) Pays 
of November The fi«>d drive t»Kik 
place Itom (M 15 to Nov 15 to lielp 
the Hreudhasket with its holiday 
demands. Shirley HramhatI, CKeeulive 
director of the Breadbasket, said 

Soiin a Her it began, organizers 
realized ihe Hreadbasket needed more 
help and the food drive otfcred a great 
opportunity for students to get more 
involved with helpin)i in their 
community, she said j 

Tlie project is iww called t ats 
for Cans, and last year, campus 
organizations raised TO.ikh) 
pounds of food. 



The IVhhI helped the Hreadbasket 
prepare U.IKKl fhanksgiving baskets 
and 1 5,(KX( C'hnstmas ba.skets, which 
were given to hungry families for the 
holidays. 

"If it wasn't for Cats for Cans, the 
Thanksgiving baskets would barely 
exist Now we can really put them 
together," Hramhall said 

This year. Cats for Cans has 
increased their goal to yo.lHK) pounds 
of food, a 2QSHW pound increase from 
last year's goal. 

*l think it's really great Cats for 
Cans has raised their goal, because the 
need ha.s certainly increased." 
Dram ha 1 1 satt) 

Riley C(vunty is number tine in the 
stale of Kansas for p<nerty and one in 
five people in the county arc at or 
below the poverty level, she said 

t'imerson said she feels the new 
goal of W.tKK) pounds is possible if 
the entire campus gets involved. 

"We're all in dilTercnt groups, so if 
we network, we can gel the whole 
campus involved," she said 

Various groups on campus have 
already begun working on pro|ects 
and activities to help with the drive 
During Homa-oniiiig, J.tMXt pounds 
was collected at the preliminarv 
bi>dy building competition. 

"I loved seeing all the cans come 
m and pile up." Iinersein said 

Lambda Chi ,'\lpha fratenntv 
will collect can*, at the K-State vs 
Colorado football game on Nov IX 
The first 1 ,(KK) people to donate w ill 
a'ceive purple and white pom pums. 
donated by It's Greek To Mc Int 



u^ 



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Ihe Dcparmieni of Archilectwit 
l.ngineenng will construct a building 
made eomplelely out of cans in 
Manhattan Town (enter Shoppers 
can donate either a can tir a dollar loi 
the chance lo jjiiess how many cans 
arc in the structure and thiw to win 
loisvif dilTereni K-Siaie prizes. 

Several campus honoraries. such 
as Moriar Hoard senior honorary, have 
issued challenges In others bonoraries 
to see which organization can gather 
the most cans. 

Those who are in grotips that 
might want to get involved should call 
the Hreadbasket or attend the nc\t 
meeting. Hramhall said 

Ihe next nicciiiie will fx: at 7 pin 
Nov I \ in the ( duncil Chamber in the 
K-Stale Studetii I num. 

Students who would like to partic- 
ipate on an individual level can also 
get involved hv volunteenng or hy 
donating cans, 

"1 vcryone can jiet involved. There 
are never i.'noiit.'h wiluntecrs." 

See FOOD ORIVI, Page TO 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



SPonsEonon 
suNoawus 




THURSDAY, OCTOBfR 30, 1997 





IIG 1 2 WOM 



NCE LINEUPS AT BIG 1 2 MEDIA DAY 



TEXAS 



icvn 

tlciid L'lMvIv Marsha Sharp 

I'rnbabk' slartcnt: 

J Mdindu Si'hmuckcr 

2i Julie l.akv 

24 ( ryslal Holes 

J.1 ReiiL'lbncbutt 

4i Alicia TKoinpMtti 



I* I KEM ■V*^ 



G, 5-y, sophivrmwc 
0, 5-9, juitlDr 
C, 6-2, senior 
(i, 5-ti. junior 
K 6-l,icnlor 



IDERS 




NOTES: Texas Tech *as piciied Nti. I in (lie 

Dig 12 Preseason Coaclics' Poll Senior Thompson 

Alicia Thompsun was named Big 12 

Preseason Player orihe Vcar, ThompM>n \*iis also named to tiie IJig 12 

Prciicaiion All-Contcrcnce First Team. K -Stale knocked Texas Tech out 

or Ihe Big 1 2 Toiirnatncni in the second round last season 



TEXAS LONGHORNS 

Head cuich: Jod) ( unra«ll 

Ptobabtc starters 

14 Vanessa Wallace ti. 5-**. junior 

2S Aniieta Jackson (.', (»-4. senior 

24 [-.dwina Brown F, 5- 10, sophomoa' 

2i Kim Luinnius G, 5-X, junior 

45 Jaime (}hiIc7 C, 6-2. seniur 



NOTES: Texas was picked No 2 in ihc Hig 

12 Preseason Coaches' Poll. Angela Jackson CoiirCKn 

was nominjlcil to the Dig 12 Preseason All- 

t'on(en;ncc Tirst Team in a lie for I'ltih Texas lost to Notre Dame in 

Ihc second round of the NCAA Tournament last seasi^n Nine former 

Longhoms arc playing in the WNBA and the ABL 




COLORADO BUFFALOES 



H»d coich: (ill Barry 

Probable starters 
14 Damictta Vclicica 

21 la Shcna <iraham 

22 Alexis Tclts 
2i tiricka Uradford 
44 Nikkt Swagjjer 



T, fi-(l. senior 
<i. 5-1, senior 
(i, 5-6, senior 
r, 6- 1 . junior 
K f^■^. freshman 




NOTES: Colorado was picked No. i in the 

Big 12 Prc^'ason Coaches' Poll Colorado Barry 

won the inaugural Big 12 lournamcnl lust 

year, bcatiny K-Slatc 54-44 iii the final game Iwn ol the lUilN' iicy 

players, La Slwna (iraham and T.ricka Bradford, are Irtmi the Kansas 

City urea, Colorado advanced to the Swcci I A last year 



BAYLOR LADY BEARS 

Mead coach Sonja Hogg 
Probable slarters 

5 Lara Webb (i, 5-III, junior 
/2Tcnj Ellis G, 5-5, Junior 
ill Nicttle Palmer K S-U), senior 
i2 Tasia Wnghl (i, 6- 1 . senior 
42 Kacy MolTill F, 6-4, junior 

* 
NOTES: Baylor *as picked to finish No 7 
in Ihe Big 12 Preseason C oaches* Poll Nicole 
Palmer is originally from Overland Park, 
Kan Lara Webb was chosen Big 12 Newcomer of Ihe Year in the Big 
12 Preseason Coaches' Poll The Hears relum a majority of their play- 
ers, losing one Ictlcrwinner lo graduation 




OKLAHOMA STATE COWGIRLS 

Head coach. Hick llaltcnnan 
Probable slarters: 

II) Kouriney Bower (J, 5-T. junior 
12 Sarah Boyd ti. 5-111, senior 

24 Renee Rnbf rt!t Kf-ID, <tenior 
32 f hen I dwurds h 6-2, senior 
4S DeviHi Magncss C, 6-7. freshman 

NOTES: Oklahoma Stale was picked to fin- 
ish No. K in Ihc Big 12 Preseas4)n ( oaches' RobflftS 
Poll. At 6 feet, 7 inches, fk-von Magness is 
the lallcsi player in the conference Rcnce Roberts was a Second Team 
All-Big 12 seleeiion a year ago (juard Sara Jackson is from Junction 
City, Kan. fourteen of the Cowgirls" 1 6 players arc from Oklahoma. 



K'STATE WILDCATS 




Head cotcli. Deb Pnttci >on 
ProbiUe sttners: 
4 Brit iKobtoii 
23 Jenny Coal son 
42 Angie Finkcs 

44 Ewa Loskowslu 

45 Nicky Ramagc 



G,5-7,Kiilor 

G. 5-1 1, junior 
Cfr-TsophtHnoft 
F, A-0, iimior 

1, 6-l,iiupbuuiore 




MOTES: IC-State ww picked U) imish No 'i 

in the Uig 12 PrctetMia rnj>.hcji' ?M Coadi Jocobson 

Deb Pittcnon took the W ildctU to the Tint 

K-SiatetpfKarance m the viomen s NCAA Tounwmcnt in lo \f,irs in 

her fiist year as hcaJ ik.kH IuI wsmhi The Cats rvtmn senior Bnt 

Jacoh^OO, ■ Big 12 Preseason AB-Conlciencc Firrt Team seleclion 



KANSAS JAYHAWKS 



Head coach: Marian VVathinKton 

Probable starters; 
4 (. a.sey Pruitl 
// Su/i Raymant 
22 Koya Scott 
.U Lynn Pndc 
4i Nakia Sanford 



G. 5-6. freshman 
G, 5-1 1, junior 
C, 6-.V senior 
K 6-2, st»phomore 
f, 6- .1, junior 




NOTES: Kansas Mas picked lo finish No 4 
in the Big 1 2 PrcH'ason Coaches' Poll. Kansas Washington 
won the first Big 1 2 regular season champi- 
onship with a 14-2 conference record Lynn Pride played lor ihe USA 
Junior World Championship Team, which won a gold medal this sum- 
mer The Jayhawks lost sn players from lasl year's team 



NEBRASKA CORNHUSKERS 

Head coach Paul Sandcrtord 
Probable siartcn: 

25 Lmily Thompson C, 6-3. senior 

SO Anna DeForKir C 5-1 1, lenlor 

31 Monel Williams (i, 5-'', junior 

i2 Nicole KubiJi ti, 5-10, sophomore 

33 Charlie Rogers F, 6-2, sophomore 

NOTES: Nebraska was picked lo finish No 

5 m Jhe Big 12 Preseason Coaches' Poll OeForge 

Anna [>eforge is on the Big 12 Preseason 

All-Conference First Team Kate Benson is from Prainc Village. Kan. 

Head coach Paul Sanderford led W'eslern Kentucky to three final 

Fours. 



IOWA STATE CYCLONES 




Head coach Bill fennel l> 
Probable slarters: 
4 Stacy fresc 
42 Amanda Ban/ 
45 Monica I luclman 
5i JandCrimm 
53 JavitieOhon 



G, 5-M, sophomore 
ti. 6-1), sttphomorc 
K 6-2, sophomore 
(;6-l,ieDior 
F 6- 1 . senior 




NOTE.S: Iowa State was picked to finish No. 

6 in Ihe Big 12 Preseason Coaches' Poll In Grimm 

Bill fennel ly's second year as coach, he led 

his Cyc lone team to its first NC .\A appearance es cr last season Jancl 

Gnmm leads Ihe team in rebounding w iih an a\crage of "? 4 pi-r eamc 

Jaymc OlM>n ^as named to ihe Big 12 Preseastm All-Conterciice 

Team. 



TEXAS A&M AGGIES 

Head coach: < andi Hanty 
Probable slarters 

III Kerne Patterson Ci, 5-M, junior 

14 Prissy Sharpe K 6- 1 , M>phomore 

24 Amy Yates G, 5-^. sophomore 

.'/ Kim Lindcr K 6-t). senior 

52 Quiana Harris C, 6-3, ;unior 



NOTES: Texas A&M was picked to nnish 

No 1(1 in the Big 1 2 Preseason Coaches' Poll Horvey 

The Aggies have only two non -conference 

honie games and play HI consetutivc road games this season Texas 

A&M won Ihc fmal Southwest Conference Tournametii in I 'W5 Amy 

Yates ts No. 5 on the Aggies in ihrec-pt)int shooting pcrceillage. 



OKLAHOMA SOONERS 



MISSOURI TIGERS 




Head coach Sherri C»wle 
Probable starters: 
10 Roianne Lurk 
N Jaimie Anderson 
2/ Siacey l)ak-s 
22 Micheic Workman 
34 Phylcshu Whalcy 



G, 5-S, wnior 
C, 6-3. junior 
(i, 6-0, freshman 
F 5-1 1, junior 
¥, 5-10, sophomore 




NOTES: Oklahoma was picked lo limsh No 

II in the Big 12 Preseason Coaches' Poll 

The Sm<ners won their first conference game 

last year and lost their lasl 16 Ph>lcsha Whalcy won Big 12 Rookie 

of tlK Week honors twice lasl season. Stacc7 [>ales was voted 

Preseason freshman of the ^'car by the presii. 



Mead coach Joann Rutherford 

Prohiibic starters 

12 Tanisha Johnson 

21 tkhra \Villi;ims 

31 Kevha Bunds 

44 Julie lleto) 



(i, 5-N. senior 
G, 5-6, senior 
K, 6-1, Junior 
(i. ^-11, siiphtOTiorc 




45 Lkpedemc Akpafl'umg F, 6-0. sophomore 



NO'TES: Missouri was picked lo finish No 

12 in Ihc Bij! 12 Preseason (oaches* l\ill Bonds 

Julte Helm garnered freshman of the Year 

honors last season, averaging P 5 points per game The Tigers rclum 

all five starters and have four leltcrwmncrs and three Ircshmen this 

season 



Texas Tech prepares for Cats 



tMH niHNnis 

Tenas Tech was a Saturday away from 
being all but out of the Big 12 south title 
race. 

If Oklahoma Sute would have beaten 
Missouri as expected, and if Texas Tech 
would have lost lo Texas A&M as expected, 
the Red Raiders would have been 2-2 in 
conference play, two games behind the 
Cowboyti with four to play 

But Missouri pulled offa 5 l-SO double- 
overtime win and Texas Fcch beat the 
Aggies, 13-6. Instead of playing catch-up 
with Oklahoma State, ihe Red Raiders find 
themKlves lied for ftrsi with four games 
left. 

"Needless lo say, Saturday was a big win 
for us," Texas Tech coach Spike Dykes said 
"It was one of those knock-down, drag -out 
■ffam we've had with A&M ihc past few 
yean, and we were fortunate to come out on 
lop." 

Texas Tech will be host lo K-Siate 
Saturday, but it is expected lo lose. 
However, ihc Red Raiders will gun lor two 
upsets in two weeks 

They're led by senior quarierbsck 
Zebbic Leth ridge, a scrambling quarterback 
wfio IS often compared especially this 
week as Texas Tech prepares to play the 
Cats to K- Stale's scrambling quarter- 
back, Michael Bishop. 

Last year Texas Tech played the Csis 
tough m Mtnhtttui, running lOJ plays 



from scrimmage before losing 21-14. 
However, this year the Red Raiders 
are without running back Byron 
Hanspard who rushed for more than 2,(K)0 
yards last season before going to the NFL 

So what does Dykes think the Red 
Raiders can do to run 10) plays and control 
the game again .' 

"There's not much we can do," he said 
"Nobody's moved the ball against them (K- 
Suie) all year " 

However, K- State coach Bill Snyder 
won't rest quite yet. 

"I think, as always, a Spike Dykes- 
coached football team is going to be a 
tough game for anybody," he said. 

Texas Tech enters ihe game 4- J, 3- 1 m 
Big 12 play. The Red Raiders have won 
tha'c of their past four games, losing only 
to No I Nebraska Also, they've won three 
of their four home games this season 

But. like Snyder, Dykes won't rest quite 
yet. 

"We've got Kansas Slate staring us in 
the face." he said 'They're in the tc^ 20, 
and they're 6-1.1 imagine they're licking 
ihcir chopt." 

Totas Tech has a relatively balanced 
ofTcnse The Red Raiders average 154 I 
yards a game on the gnnuuL and pass for 
another 1 92 However, they alio have a rel- 
alively balanced scoreboard They average 
24.4 points a game, and give up 22.'?. 

tonsidcnng the Cats haven't scored 
fewer than 2J puinu in s pme this season 



and are averaging }6.7. ttie Red Raiders 
will probably have to step up their offense 
performance to come out on top 

And how does Dykes think ihey match 
up with K -Slate's defense? 

"Not very good, " he said "Kansas Stale 
is awesome. They 're awesome on defense, 
and they're awesome on offense and they're 
awesome kicking Thai's why they're a top- 
1 5 team." 

Texas Tech will also battle injuries The 
Red Raiders have nine injured players, 
including three who will not see any play- 
ing time this week 

"We've had our back to the wall every 
week. There's not many tomorrows left." 
Dykes said 

And lo find a tomorrow, the Red 
Raiders will have to ftnd a way to slow 
down Bishop He rushed for negative Iwn 
yards at Oklahoma lasl wcxk. but was nurs- 
ing a sore ankle and still managed to pass 
well enough to lead the Cats to a 14-poinl 
victory over the Sooncrs. 

Dykes said afiet watching the film of 
that game, he knows his defense will have 
its hands full Although the Sooner^i shut 
down Bishop on the ground, Dykes expects 
him to be healthy and ready on Saturday. 

"Watching him last year at Blinn Junior 
College, you knew he knew whul it takes to 
get it done," Dykes said "I think he's 
rclenllcss It's gonna take more ihan I can 
explain to slow him down," 



Politics, history 



WHtK 





C » I s r N 

KUENZI 

CHITON KMNH It o ivMor m 

i«r<l t-^a-i to C'MMn ai 



There have been many allegations of 
conspiracies in our society over the 
years 

There are those who cltiim there were 
several groups, including the CIA, 
Hehind President Kennedy's a.ssasst na- 
tion. Others arc com meet! the I J.S gm - 
cmmeni has been covering up know ledge 
of beings from other planel-s for years 
Still others say Neil Armstrong's one 
"giant leap for mankind " sclually took 
place on an elaborate studio set in 
Hollywood 

I don't have the foggiest idea whether 
any of these conspiracy ihcorics are cor- 
rect, but lhc7 got me wondering Mhal 
kind of underhanded things were hap- 
pening in sports 

After some exhaustive research and a 
little imagination, I've come up with 
some conspiracies of the sports world 
You might be surprscnj wliat I uncov- 
ered 

Believe it or not, one of the most 
shocking discoveries I made during my 
research revolves around the K-Slate 
football team 

The Wildcats' quarterback, Michael 
Bishop, is not a pcrscm. lie's a rdwt cre 
aied by head coach Bill Snyder You don'i 
believe me ' Well, let's review the focts 

The reason Snydci chose to come lo 
K-Stale several years .igo wasn't because 
he wanted a challenge He came lo K- 
Stalc because it's an engineering school 



by conspiracies 



w ith the resources neccssarv to create the 
ultimate weapon, Michael Bishop 

Still don't believe me " Well, the pasl 
couple of weeks. Snyder hasn't let 
Bishop talk at the poslgamc press confer- 
ence. I have a strong suspicion there's a 
quirk in Bishop's .ludii* k.i>mponenls 

In addition, when Bishop hurt his leg 
in the Texas A& M game, Snvder had sev - 
eral of his players create a wall between 
Bishop and the ABC cameras I suspect 
there were a few Imtsc wires lunging out 
of Bishop's leg 

My only question is \vliv Btsht^, as a 
robot, would allow Nebraska lo heat him 
for the first lime The only solution I 
could come up with is the Ku.skL*rs have 
a few cyborgs ol their (*wn 

My second conspiracy theory sur- 
rounds Cal Ripken Jr 's strvak for the 
Buhimore Orioles \ source within the 
organi/ation tells iiic it aciually took five 
clivne> of Ripken lo accomplish the feat 
The whole thing was sponsored by Major 
League Baseball iit .in ctlori lo bring 
some cxcilcmciil back to the game 

The original Ripken alircd in I'^K** 
and IS living Ihe rest of his days on a 
secluded Island in the Caribbean 

The ihird conspiracy I uncovered 
mvoKe* this year's World Series After 
doing some digging, I found out the 
f londa Marlins' cliampiiinship was all a 

Sm THfOmiS, Page 10 



-! 




MftDKTOR 
KAOTOUnON 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




ftURSDAY, OCTOBER 30 



19 9 7 



DAILYcrossword 



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3 Cupid's 22 Coniputer 

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I CTI IIIDBII9 For aiwMers to loday't cfDnwonl. caiT 

91 VHIrEVl l-«0IM«4-e*73l9»Cpw^mitiuta,louch- 

[ wo«/rotyyphor)>t.{l8->ooly.)AKingF— lurtMfviot.NYC. 



1022 CRYFTOQUIP 

NTR NVUYL AYQO NEURD 

TQSRL NTRDR CEW 

E SDQNRBNVQO BAECW 

YD TYW BQONDEBN. 

Yesterday's CiyptoquJp: FANCIFUL USED-CAR 
LOT AD; SECONDHAND CARS IN HRST-CRASH CON- 
DITION. 

Todajr's Cryptoqulp clue: C equals W 



LOOKINGbaek 

I ^72 - A iommaiit) performance was given this day for the (Jueen 
orHnjiland. The star was I lion John, 

I9K6 - I>isL-DVcr maga/inc reported that almost 4J million Ions ot 
dust Kiilc on lh« United States each year. 



ADhoc 



I 



^i$ rfrr mm so 




Exhibit displays narrative art 



,'iwilw 



w$scuro*TMnn 

Noticeably absent from arl In the IW)s and 
IWis i!i any Ibrm ol narrative or sturytetlinj!. 

The high ahslraciiim and rninimalrsi move- 
ments ot ttio<>e two decades strif>ped mainiitream 
an of any social or hlsmrlcal narraiivc Painted 
lines on canvas do not speak to difTercnt cul- 
tures, lei alone the casual 
museum visitor. 

It wa.su'l until the 

\^ _^^^^^^w relish narrative again. 
\l ^^^^^^ alheii with mixed results 
1^^^^ I Ihe slow ushcr- 

I ^^^M I ing In of the polilically 
I ^^^ / correct moveineni after 
f I ilie NTOs i\ mm culml- 

^tei^^^__ iiJlini; in Ihe well*choreo- 
j^raphed ha I let ot feel- 
ings, cultural pride aiul yoU'Can't-undcrslanil- 
nie-becausc-you-aren'l-me psychosis that is (he 
IWtk. 

In thiii vein, narrailvc adisis are hemg redis- 
covered (orexploiiedl as an alternative lo anisis 
who arc more obsessed with an and art history 
than the relation of ihetr work to Mieial history 
It's an illustration of the cycles ot an fashion, 
making even nurginal reg:lonulisls suddenly 
imponani 

l-rom somewhere in this VI universe 
emerges the Marianna KislEer Beach Museum 
of Art exhibition "African- American Works on 
Paper." a etil lection of arl from the (ieorgta- 
based t'ochran tolleelion ihal will h; on dis- 
play untilJan 4 

I hnny up the narrative diseussuvn because 
the bctier works in ihisexhihiiion deal v^iih it, m 
some cases almost at Ihe expense of Ihe art 
Itself 

Take Jacob l.awn;ncc surely the most 
notable black .American anisi of the 20ih 
( ' enl ury Law re n c e 's ■ ■ R ev ol I n t he A ni I siad" a 
silkHTcen on paper ll'tX**), may be a riot of 
color and intenwineJ surlitce forms, but Ihe 



purcty artistic considerations serve best to 
emphasize! the narrative, that being the true 
story of an uprising cin a slave ship 

Lawrence is the grandfather of modern Hack 
history and MKlal painting, having in Ihe 1 '^.^(Is 
turned to his native Harlem to record the com- 
munity artiund him. His paintings have, over a 
long career, explored such historical figures as 
fredcrlck Douglass, Harriet fubman and John 
Hrown. while avoiding politically correct cliche, 

Lawrcnce and other artists in the exhibition 
illustrate how Afncan-Amencan cuhure is per- 
haps best told through its tumultuous history, 
which has been central to the contemporary 
hlack experience The narrative is found in their 
art simply because it has to be. 

Hilton Kramer, m a May 26. I«>74. New York 
Times review of Lawrences work, wrote that 
(he artist working in a historical context must 
possess "a supreme conv leiion about the impor- 
tance of his subject Ik requires, in addition, a 
public though not necessarily or even pri- 
manly what we normally think of as an 'art pub- 
lic' that shares this attitude toward his sub- 
ject" 

The narrative ts again found in Romare 
Hcardcn s pfovtKative "The family." elehmg on 
paper (1^75), and Allan Edmonds' "Playtime 
Inner ( ily." silksereen on paper (l'>76). Both 
iitih/e collage by pulling together a col lection 
of images, both from Ihe artist and popular cul- 
ture, to reconte.Muall/e them in a sticial milieu. 

Although this exhihilion only includes work 
since the 1420s with some emphasis on ihe 
1 4XIK it encompasses everything frnm the scg- 
regatitin of Ihe first half of the century lo ihe 
li^Wls civil rights nuncmenl lolhe pride move- 
ments of contemporary culture And mit all of it 
IS narrative. 

Joe (Jvcrstrecrs "Mahogany Hall." 
silksereen on paper t I'^Wt, celebrates I he effu- 
sive sounds of ja// with explosive cokirs Sam 
(iilliam's "Dreamless Romances." mixed media 
on paper llWH). geometrically relates bright 
hues of red. orange and yellow. 




The art museum's conned Ion to this show, if 
you're wondering, is ihe medium of paper; Ihe 
museum's holdings are strongest in ihis sense. 
Last year's exhibition ol works on paper from 
Arkansas and ihe t'ochran C'olleciion under- 
score how artists can soinctiiiies he freer w ith 
paper than a more finished medium id oil on 
canvas 

Scemmglv simple wurks. Iile fli/abeth 
tatlelt's spare porlraii ol a devnut woman, 
"Virginia.' lithograph and collage on paper 
i IW4). reveal the psychological power some of 
the pttrtrads m Ihe exhihillon possess. 

The fears and dreams one faces in life is 
evi)ked grace fully in John Wilson's "Dialogue," 
etching iin paper |1''7.1|. which portrays a 
voung h<vv proudiv looking past a haunting 
skull 

While Ihe (ochran Col lee lion is perltaps a 
hit too diverse for ils own gmnl one could 
easily make three more coherent shows out of 
this one the linle narratives m a handful ot 
wi)rks are the treasures lurking beneath Ihe sur- 
face. 



F Need mofv Nifo r 

■Alticon-Ame(.:on WoAi r■:^ 
hpv' will b« al iht 6«ofh 
Muveum uniii ion t l^a'- 
muieum It ofwn from 10 
o.m lc430pm TMiddy 
throegK Fridoy ond Ifom I ' 
4 30 p m Soliif<Joy and 
Sundoy Iti* fnuseuir. n o(>-- 
unlil B p m on Thjrsdoy 
Adintuion li Itm tv JK". 
ifllormotion col 5327718 



► Calendflf (oil eventi are ot 
llw B*och Muitum] 

• Nov 5 Sandro Jofws * 
diicusk the woft of 
Howordsno Piridell # 
noon 01 port 0- Af f "it 
Wsdnejdoj food (of 
Thotjght lectures 

a No* f 6 A free lout ol 
ihe 'Afritan-Amencon 
Wsrki on Paper' w<tl be 
giMri al 7 p ffl 

e No»f 16 AbtincWli 
be given fealut^ng \pit 
m\h Dennij W'lion i<vi 
tfOfyl«<lir>g by frjncM 
Vjloli Resefvoiions or* 
teqiiifed CMt'!$20pf' 
person Cod 53277)8 

tin rejeri'OtKjns 

• Dec 6 A bkxl-p<in' 
Mfd wO^i^iOp lo' p«Op'^ 
««gki ftwi o) ogt and 
oldet will be horn 1 1 
om to 12.30pm 
KwefwtfOrij ore '«^vti 
and the works^ <oils 
t5 per perton Call 
5327718 Iw 
rtMrvohont. 



Pacino at his most 
evil in ^Advocate' 



DEVIIiS 



•TtON VOOtl 

See if ihis sounds familiar: a hotshoi 
young hunk of a lawyer receives a lucra- 
tive contrjict offer fntni an urban law firm. 
Mc and his wife move into a beautiful new 
home, courtesy of the firm, and all is well 
until they reali/e the firm has plunged 
iheni neck-deep into a world ot crime, cor- 
ruption and murder. 

In "The l>ev il's AdvtKale," tluit's exact- 
ly what we get. Like a lawyer joke gone 
had, however, the firm's boss Is not a 
mafia chieftain, but the Prince of 
Darkness himself 

Keanu Reeves stars as Kev in Lomax. a 
Jack.siJnv ille, f la., defense attorney who's 
never lost a case He catches the attention 
of New York lawyer John Milton, played 



by a slick, savvy and always-smiling Al 
Pacino 

Millon soon becomes the dominant 
induenee in Kevin's life Kevins wife. 
Mary Ann (Therlize Theron), sits 
alone in the couple's spacious 
penthouse while Kevin and 
Millon pal around al sporting 
evenis and .strip clubs deep into 
Ihe night. Kevin's devotion lo his 
Job and to Millon immediately 
puis a sirain on Ihe marriage. 

Mary Ann is ihe only one who can sc"C 
I he evil in Millon and the law firm She 
begins to have a series of hornfying expe- 
riences she can't explain. Kevin, blinded 
by a high-profile murder trial, ignores 
Mary Ann's pleas to the polni of insanity 
When. bcft»rc her very eyes, one of the 




partners' wives mutates into a demon, ii 

becomes startlingly apparent "Ihe fX'vil's 

Advocate" is no longer a legal thriller 

This neglect, coupled with his unre- 

lenimg ambition, puis Kevin on 

a one-way path to damnation. 

and John Millon is standing at 

ihe gate to greet him 

Though small and 
unassuming on the outside. 
Pacino IS larger than life He 
embiHJies greed, lust, vanity 
and all things evil, and lalks 
about ihem so bra/cnly il will make you 
squirm. The way he l»)ys with Mary .Ann 
desecrating her body and injecting demonic 
visions inio her mind is so iwislcd and 
sadistic It makes early I'acino charaelers like 
Michael ( urleone and Ttmv Mtwtana seem 



MoviaRaviaw 




like downright pleasant lellnws 

Disgusiing indeed, hut like the lempiaiioii 
he olfcTs Kevin al every lurn, he ts irre- 
sistible and unpredictable. W hen lie picks up 
the phone and asks his secretary to page an 
associate of the firm, he is actualK dis- 
patching his minnms lo commii murder 
All with a tooihy smile, of course 

In the climactic confroniaiion heiween 
Milton and Kevin. Pacino >lreiches the 
limits of his wi/ardry ( >ne mom enl he !•* 
unleashing a fiery nioiiologue about (.ittil 
(wilh enough cruelty to make an atheist 
blush I, the next he is dancing and lip- 
synching Id the frank Sinatra version of 
"Jl Happened in Monterrey" * ink Pavino 
could gel avvay with such a thing. 

Reeves, who received tup billing over 
Pacino. peppers Ins nonotone dialogue with 
a lake suiittiern drawl llis ponmyil id ihe 
same shallim chanutcr who surtaces in .ill of 
his films makes vnu wonder evjcily how 
many umes Pacino rolled his eyes during 
shooting 

I hcfon, on the other hand, is terrific as 
the unconventional damsel in distress .\<. 
her character slowly loses her mind, 
T heron displays a very gentiine terrtir It's 
impossible not to sulVer along w iih her as 
she gradually deteriorates Into paranoia 

Dull and outworn cliches ahooi 
lawyers selling their souls to delend guill) 
clients abtiund. Surprisingly, however. 
"The [>evil's Advocate" speaks volumes 
about ihe husband wife relationship and 
the personal resptmsibiliiy therein Like 
some s*irt of shock treatment for wayward 
souls, the film spixiks us into accept ine 
thai, when given the opportunity lo exer- 
cise I heir IVee will, people will dam it 
themselves nine limes out of III. Instead ot 
Al Pacino with a pitchfork, the devil is 
merely ixir own conscience ihai little 
impulse inside of us to chixtse what we 
know is immoral and unethical. 

Whether movie audiences will flock lo 
see "The Devil's AdviK'aie" m search ol 
answers to Ihe great moral questions ol 
our time ts doubtful al best If it's a irulv 
shocking horror film ihey seek, it doesn't 
get much beiler than this 

After all, 'lis ihe sea.son 



NUMBER9 



DILBERT 




CATBERT; EVIL H.R OtRtCTOR 



TMtRE ARE SEVERhL 
►MkNOATORY CLASSES 
FOR fAKNAGERS. 




. AVOIDING CONTACT 
lOlTH SUBORDINATES , 

. maPLACiNG Ir^^>oR^ANT 

OOCUfAENTS. 
• THE TOY OF LISTENING 
TO >OUR OWN VOICE 



1^ 

t 



HAVE VOU TAKEtH THE 
PREREQUISITE CLASS 
IN TIME r^ANA&t^\tNT ? 



TUJlCt, 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



THURSDAY, OCTOBtW 30, t997 




Todd Nicswen^tr, tenior in tpMch. right, diicuiifi 
paran)i Widnasdoy ohamoon 



MCK HIIMIAai/CollttiBx 
Cardwell Half whili giving a lour lo proip«ctive itudantt and their 



Paula Jones seeks to drop defamation charge against 
trooper after lawyers question witnesses about her past 



uiociATionuu 

LITTLE ROC'K, Ark - The woman 
suing President Clinton Tor Mutual 
harasisnicni ^vanis to drop her claim that 
a stale trooper's depiction of her as an 
eager mistress tarnished her reputation 

Paula Jones filed a motion lo amend 
her la^« suit Tuesday, less than two weeks 
after lawyers for trooper Danny 
Ferguson began questioning potential 
witnesses about her past. 

Silt Bristow. Ferguson s attorney, has 
defended the questioning, saying it's his 
job to "determine what her reputation 
was" 

Jones' lawyers hase begun talking to 
potential v^ itnesses about Clinton's past, 
and one scheduled for a deposition next 
month is Gennifer Flowers, who claims 
she had a long romantic relationship 
with Clinton. She has been subpoenaed 
to give a deposition m two *eeks> 

Ferguson allegedly set up a hotel 



room meeting in Little Rock between 
Jones and Ihen-Gw. Clinton in May 

Jones' S7QO,UO0 lawsuit against 
Clinton and Ferguson alleges thai 
Clinton exposed himself and asked her 
for oral sex She was u stale employee at 
the time and tlaims Clinton later used 
his inducnce to land her in a dead-end 
job. 

CImton has denied the allegations 
and said he does not recall meeting 
Jones. 

Jones filed a defamation lawsuit 
against Ferguson, accusing him of being 
the source of a published account that 
depicted her as eager lo be Clinton's 
mistress. If the loss-of-reputai ion charge 
is dropped, Ferguson will remain a co- 
defendant, accused of conspiring with 
Clinton to violate Jones' constitutional 
nghts. 

Defamation claims against Clinton 
have already been dropped 



As part of the quest for witnesses for 
Jones' case, a former high school class- 
mate of Clinton was questioned for 
about four hours in Dallas im Tuesday. 
Dolly Kyle Browning has written a icll- 
all hook that she said is loosely based on 
what she claims was a 33-year relation- 
ship with Clinton. 

Flowers is scheduled to give Jones' 
lawyers a deposition in Dallas on Nov. 
14. 

■'[ don't think it comes as a surprise." 
her attorney. Rugger Burke, told The 
Dallas Morning News. He refused to 
speculate on what Flowers might be 
asked. 

Flowers claimed during the 1992 
presidential campaign that she had had a 
12-year romantic relationship with 
Clinton while he was married He denied 
that, buisaid he had caused pain in his 
marriage, 

Sm JONES, Page 10 




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Scientists to develop new technique 
to Idll salmonella, E. coli in animals 



AISOOATf D MISS 

CiRIFFIN, Ga. - Faced with out- 
breaks or salmonella and E. coli, sci- 
entists arc developing a better way to 
protect food; killing deadly bacteria in 
the bowels of chickens and cattle 
before the animals even leave the 
farm. 

"We've concentrated on the end 
priKiuct of food so long, when we 
should be looking at how to stop it 
from being contaminated in the first 
place.' said Lester M, Crawford, direc- 
tor of the Center for Food and 
Nutritional Quality at Georgetown 
University in Washington, DC 

Salmonella, Campylobacter and 
toxic forms of E. coli alt get their start 
in animals' intestines. They can spill 
out in the slaughterhouse and make 
their way into food. 

Chickens arc sprayed with chlorine 
and quick-chilled to retard bacteria. 
Inspectors touch, sniff and sometimes 
test animal carcasses for contamina- 
tion. Another method, in which bacte- 
ria are killed with zaps of radiation, 
has proved too conttovenial for wide- 
spread use in this country. 

In a lab in this Georgia town, food 
scientist Michael Doyte looked tnside a 
cow's stomach for a way to kill E. coli 
OI57:H7. the mutant microbe blamed in 
the recall of 25 million pounds of 
ground beef this summer. 

Doyle found that several types of 
bacteria inside the cow make their own 



repellent against E. coli 0157. so he 
took those bacteria from cattle drop- 
pings and tissue, grew them in the lab 
and fed them to calves in their milk. 

The bacteria not only wiped out E. 
coli 1 57 in one group of calves with- 
in three weeks, it also kept the bacteria 
from invading a second group, said 
Doyle, who runs the University of 
Georgia Center for Kood Safely and 
Quality Enhancement. 

Doyle hopes his work will lead to a 
product that could be fed to cows to 
clean them out before they are sent to 
slaughter He is hoping to get his prod- 
uct to market within three years, at a 
cost of about S I per animal. 

"This type of technology is exactly 
what we need if we are going to keep 
the bacteria out of the food supply." 
said Caroline Smith Dewaat. director 
of food safety for the Center for 
Science in the Public Interest, an inde- 
pendent consumer advocacy group. 
"Wc need to have farmers address the 
bacteria before the cattle go to slaugh- 
ter" 

Several researchers are working on 
a similar concept in chickens. 

A new oral vaccine aimed at cut- 
ting down salmonella infections from 
eggs and poultry could be available for 
farmers by early ncjti year. 

Developed by biologist Roy Curtiss 
111 of Washington University in St. 
Louis, the vaccine is a weakened form 
of salmonella that allows the bird's 
defenses lo fight off infections. 



Scientists at the US Department of 

Agriculture's Research Service in 
College Station. Texas, have also 
patented a mixture of hacteria from a 
chicken's gut that wards off salmonel- 
la in chicks. 

The mixiurtr is now being sold 
overseas. The approach is awaiting 
approval In the United States from the 
FotHl and Drug Administration 

In Canada, Andy Potter and his col- 
leagues at the nonprofit Veterinary 
Infectious Disease Organisation arc 
also working on an E. coli vaccine for 
chickens. They hope eventually to 
develop a supervaccinc that can also 
fight salmonella and Campylobacter. 

Many types of E. coli arc present in 
humans and animals and aid digestion. 
But the toxic form E. coli 1)157 serves 
no purpose, neither does salmonella or 
Campylobacter. 

Killing bacteria inside animals isn't 
foolproof Doyle, for example, still has 
to find out how long his method will 
keep E. coli at bay and whether the 
bacteria will interfere with other ani- 
mal antibiotics. 

But the scienusis see their 
approach as part of a series of check- 
points from the farm to America's din- 
ner table Now. much of the burden 
rests on whoever is in the kitchen to 
make sure the beef and chicken ate 
cooked thoroughly to destroy any 
deadly bacteria 

"food safely begins v^hcn the ani- 
mal is bom," Potter said. 



Fright Nlghtll 

with Dicki 




Ofriclal Dick Vltal« 
Marchandlaa will be on •«!• 

•t Bramlsga Cotlaaum 

•Mini -Trie flock" Bsaketbaltt 

•Dick Vitaies latsat book 

"Holding Coun" 

with 1)1 purehaiaa rtotlva a 

apaclal am 1flS7-flB Dick 

Vltela'a Collaga Baakatbalt 

Ravlaw MaoBzina. 



ry /ifraid' 




I It i— i ■ 



Dick Vital* Wiil Rocic K-Stat»'s Bramlage Coilieum 

Come for a hoopin' howiin' purple prow^lirv' good time with ESPN's Dick Vitole) 
Meet both the men's and women's baikeiboll teoms. First 1 ,000 oflending will 
receive o free i-shirt. Trick or treating, wild contests, lots of free stuff and more 
surprises ore in s'ore. 

Priglit Night II • Thursday, October 30 • 6:30 p.m. 

Bramtoge Coliseum on the Konsos State Urtiversity campus * Free admission 
This is your very first chance to see the 'Cots of '97-98 Doors open and trick ot 
Ireoling begins at 6 30 p m , program at 8 p.m. 



Get vaid \^th 



rOlt TICKfl INfORMATION CAU 

l-QOO-'cirl-CAI"? 

OR CONTACT WWW KJU iDli/SPORT&INFO.' 




-t- 



-i 



k 



DEADLINES 

ClouifiwJ ods tnuii be placed 

by noon H>e doy befws th« 

dote ywj worn jfour od lo fun 

Clouihed dispby ods rnust be 

ploe«d by 4 p m Iwo mxlilng 

doys prior to riw dole you 

wrant your ad to run 



OUf5IK3N5» 
CM! S33-MSS 



KANSAS STATE C Oil EGI AN 




THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1997 



CUSSIFIED AD WRITING TIPS 

^ tin Hwni or Mrvictt firrt. Alwayi put wtioi item 
or iefvice you ore odverlismg liril This helpi polen- 
lial buyeri fiod what ifiey are looking lor 
Don't UM abbrvviotiefli. Mony buyers are con- 
fused by obbreviationi 

CofuJdor including fh* prk* Thi^ teth buyers if 
rtwy ofe looking at tomeltimg m their price range 



000 



BULLETIN BOAflD 



010 



AiwoMncoiwonto 

M CASH FOR COLICQE 

tS GHANf S AF^D SCHOL 
ARSHIPS AVAILABLE 
FROM SPONSORS' M 
GREAT OPPORTUIM1TY 
CALL NOW 1<aOOIS3} fl890 

19M ROVAL PURPLE I 
PurdMH one today 
Stop bv 103 K*clil*. 
Buy novw fot only 
t24.»ft. 

ADVANCED FLIGHT 

TRAINING from 7,000 
hour ATP tnftructor Molli 
en^iiiG ATP thiQugli atngle 
engine private Hugh Irvm, 
539 3128 

CMVIS MOVES tpKial 

ifiriy III ^(ji^inierciflt end 
(•tklentiBl move* /du 
pack, we move We will 
load VCH» trudi or t,ailer. 

DIDVOU FORGET 
VOUR 1»9J ROYAL 
PURPLE with CO-ROM 7 
Plctcil up TODAY in 
103 Itodzte. Triay can 
■till tw i>urctiaa«(l. 
wfiil* «ii|>pli*t tatt fpf 

OR. LOVES Adiiir Vidoo 
CaiHtIs Rnniala it Sale* 
CD ROMS, Iwolt slore. 
ieeitiAt nnveiiies and toy*, 
12p m 8p m Monday Ihru 
Saturday Must Iw 18 to 
Enlfii DR. LOVES •EX- 
OTIC DANCERS, IMC. A 
Bfl«f flitr (fliTisle daoceri 
nepfti^d Musi he 21 to en 
ter Tuosflav thru Satur- 
day Bpm I2p in 539 
0190, hitpJ/www kan 
ttas riev drlcivsi E mail 
drl ov«s@ti a naas, pel 

EXPEHIENCEDWEIGHT 
trainer lot htre MMa 
gatnt or l(JW (at I tOO% 
Ouaraniee arid reatonabto 
rates Call Wipaton Vang 
lor appoiiitmant, 565-9025 

LEAR*4T0FLY'K State 
Ftying Cfub tias ftve air 
planes, lowest rates. For m 
tormalion call 539-3733 

090 1 



PArtl«i-n-iler> 

AOO A eniia louch of ciau 
to your next party) Call 
1lVav"«'»Wi>tBr Party (or 
portable tiot tub rentals 
537-7587 

ADDA splaati to your next 
t)a<(li CellWetN Wild Hot 
Ti^h's tor your twtt pany at 

mvstr )HJh 

Manhattan Ctty Ordl- 
tiane* 4S14 asauraa 
•very parson ecpral op- 
pftrtunlty In hirutirtg 
without dlf llnclion on 
»r:i;ounl of raca, >•■, fa- 
milial status, military 
status, disability, ralt- 
9lon, age, color, na- 
tional Ofigin or ancas- 
try- Violations should 
Im raportad lo Iha Ol- 
factor of Human R«- 
•ourcas at City Hall, 
S87-1A40. 




for Rent- 
Apts. Furcttsh^d 

ALL BILLS PAIOIi'i Two 
bedroon) wiiii wastiet/ dry 
ar. One blodi Irom cam 
p4^. Also with partring 
•pace Cad 776 929B Only 
$375 



• New 

• Fully Furnished 

• 2 & 4 Bedroom 

• Alarm System 

• Swimming Pool 

new L»A«iiig 
539-0500 

UNivERsny 

APARTMENTS 

3215 COUfGE AVE 



ices, individual leases 
Ptpnse call 539 5071 

iio^HJ^^^^H 

For Ront- 

ApL 

Unfuntlshod 

S296 $310 ONE-BEOROOiVI 
apartments availahtq now 
aridJflii 1 No|»t« 587 
0399 



2 Bedrooms for 
the Price of I 

limik'J number \cH 
call 539-2951 



AVAILABLE NOW or sec- 
ond samesTer. Different 
aires, some furntshad 
Moat utilities paid Quiet 
and clean. Short term 
lease available 537-S38S 

AVAILABLE NOWil* Stu 
dio apartmervi is within 
walking distance lo uni 
varsity- Everything eiac 
trie, water/ trash paid 
539^6318 or 537 8228 

AVAILABLE ONE. two. 
threa, lour tjedroon^s, nica 
apartmepts near campus 
with gieat prices First 
month free. 537 1666 

CUTE. ONE BEDROOM 
apsnrnenl close to KSU 
campus 413 N t7th, (ffi5' 
month with water/ trash 
paid. Laundry tacitities lo 
cated on tile Kitchen com 
plete with stove, refrig 
erator. and dishwastrer. 
Don't waiti Call MDI 
776-3804 

NOW LEASIIW. One to 

three (>adroam npert 
n^enls/ houses Tienr KSU, 
S2?Sic)S6M) Allianca 
Property Managartfant 
S3»^3S7. 

OCTOBER AVAIL ABILITV 
at 1005 Bluarttont Ave 
One bedroom, S385/ 
month Water and trath is 
paid. Close to campui- Call 
MDI 776 3804 



1 Bedrooms First 
Month FREE 

('jII tor djily 
special • limited 



ONE-BEOROOM APART 
MENT available imme 
d lately Just across tlie 
street from campus at 1B07 
College Heights. tSSit 
month Stove, refrigarator, 
and dishwasher iricluiltHl. 
Water anci trash paid- 
Laundry facilities tooted 
on site Call MDI to view I 
776 3804 

STUDIO APARTMENT 
Nice one bedroom, heel 
paid S295 plus WBlaf/ 
trash 1019 Houston. 1- 
HOO 397 2436 then 874- 
5tn OPENTODAYI 



Apartment 
Living At Its Best 
Lat-gf 2 liedroomt 

Sandiionc Apts. 
(^ntbrtd^ Sq. Apt« 

V y 

Hill 
I nvestment 

THREE fIVE BEDROOMS 
One blodi to campus 
Newly remndslBd Must 
see to tie ii eve I All ttie 
arrienities ReasonabI* 
rant. 539-4641 

TWO- THREE BED 
ROOMS One blodt to cam 
pus. Very nice with all 
amenitMS. Reasonable 
rem 539-4641. 

TWO BE DROOM AND lour 
twdroom apartmenti close 
to campus Rent tor 14 
iTiontlis starting Novamtwr 
1 and receive lirtt month 
and test month rent free. 
Nupels Call 7761340 

TWO BEDROOM APART 
MENT within walking dis 
tarwe of KSU Available 
now) t026 Osage. 5495/ 
month Water and trash 
paid. StovA. rrrfrigerator, 
and dishwasher. CatI MD4 
7J6 3804 



UMfVERBTTY COM- 
MONS Ruu'iiiitMluit need 
ad Several two bedriMim 
apartments needing a sec 
OTMt roommate Fully fur 
fim^A, rnariy ftudant mtv 



SRANPNEW 

CAMPUS msi 

APARTMENTS 

1620 Met am Lane 

4 Uctlrituni wiih 2..1 

or 4 person 

iKxupancy rates. 

• 2 person $500 

• 3 pcniiin $690 

• 4 periKm $HAO 

Shittf h-tm unit Mtmttin 
/i-fi^i't tlYAtilithir 

Managed by 

McCullough 
Developtnent 

776-$a04 

hllf im^ fTn>'j*tTfyr1ff' *n-m 



UNIVERSITY TERRACE 
APARTMENTS Leasing 
lor full or siimmBi, large 
twn end three bedroom 
apartments wilh washer, 
dryer hooiiups Pool. S17- 



cemlMr or January 
587-0991 ask for James 



WALKTO csmpuslTwo 
tM)drr>om apartment local 
ed at 1113 Bert rand. S500 
pet nionth, available ini 
mediately. Shod term 
lease ok Waiter nnrf trash 
paid. H»% dishwiKher and 
un sire laundry Call tor 
and appointment M01 
776 M04 



For Rotit- 

Mou— 

AVAILABLE SECOND se 
master. fcHir- bedroom, 
two bath, ofl-itraet park- 
ing, large garage Quiet 
and clean, campui eloie, 
pel considered, 537-8389 

BRICK HOME, new carpet, 
paint, three or four, bed 
rooms with two bath 
rooms Kitchen applianr:as. 
patio, anciosed yard, close 
to campus, 539 1177 

HOUSE FOB rent at 1130 
Pomeroy. Four bedroom, 
two bath, with study 
$800' month, trash paid 
Close to campus. Waslter/ 
Dryer hookups No pela 
CallMOI776-3fl04 

TWO BEDROOM, ONE 

b^th. washer^ dryer, air 
conditioned Close to cam 
pus Brand n^w S400 plus 
utilities 1129 Clallin 
539 H673 or (7851847-8473 



For Salo- 
Mobllo Homos 

14X60 TWO BEDROOM, 
many improvments. newly 
redecorated, new a<r con 
dilKiner, washer/ dryer, 
shed Close lo campus. 
S9600 or IMM offer, 
587 9584 

VERY NICE two- bedroom 
two bsrh. New living room 
carpet All eltKtnc. central 
air Anrlarson Really 776 
4834 or Sharon at 776-7903. 



Roommate 
Wantod 



t7O0v MONTH plus one 
fourth utilities, walk to 
camput very clean: water/ 
trash paid, deposit re 
quired; 532-8785, wee 
kends 532-4941 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed for second semes 
(ar. Cloie to campus 

Water and Iroih paid 
587-9356 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted lo sublease Uni 
varsity Commons Apart 
meni Rent J250/ monih 
plus line tounti utilities 
Available mid Oecernbrsr 
AuQust Call 776 6981 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted, Wnodway Apart 
rtierita 5265 a month plus 
onn halt tiills. (nase iintii 
Juno 19981 1303)751-1641 

MALE ROOMMATE vrant 
ed to share two-bedroom 
apartment at Anderson 
Place Call Brian at 
5B7 91S7 

ROOMMATE WANTED: Be 
ginning Decemlier, to 
share hwo bedroom, two 
tiaih trailer Walnut Grove, 
SIM miles East ol Manhat 
tan, SIBO a month plus one 
hell utilities- Waler / 1 r ash 
paid. Small pets okay 
Amanda or Debbie 
1 78S 1494- 2974 

TWO ROOMMATES want 
ad 5200/ month All bills 
paid 776-4954 

tHl 



Subtsass 



DECEMBER GRADUATES 
Tvyo-bedroom sublease in 
Kansas City, llSlh and Met 
celt Lease runt Decemlwr 
1 May 31 S700 total plus 
utilities Call 77O9309 

FEMALC ROOMMATE 
1M ANTED lo lakfi over 
lease. 5258/ month plus 
one third utilities Ttiree 
tiedrooms and two belhs- 
Cloaa to campus. Call 
776 9451 

LARGE ONE BEDROOM 
apartment Two bloiAi 
from campus and Ag 
gieville Most utilities paid 
OIT street parking Laundry 
facilities on site Cats ok 
Sutilease from January- 
May SSBQi month. Call 
776 4288 

ONE BEDROOM FOR sub 

lease, sami lurnlshad if 
needed, located in Com 
tiridge Square Cathedera* 

ceilings, privets dedia, off 
tiedrnomt can move in De 





Raaumo/ 



539-5998 FOR all typing, 
editing, proof reading, 
tape transcripton, Ipipers 
thesis, dissertation, books, 
resumes, coverlirttersi 30 
plus years en per lance. 

MEOSOMETHiNO 
TYPK07 I'll tyfie papers 
for SI p9t doubla spaced 
page. I can also lyfie 
resurt>et- Choose one of 
my styln lor $16. I'll create 
your Mvto for KO. Call 
Wanda at 533-0724 7 30 
am- 3:30 pm or leave 
voice mail. 



Doslct<»p 



SEIKO COLORPOINt Dye 
Sub combo wax thermal 
color printar New in txiK 
Never used 52995. Lists 81 
$8000 Call 776 5999 

tM| 

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AUTOCftAFT 2018 Service 
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Specializing in Nissan. Dst- 
sun. Honda, Toyota, Sub 
aril. Hyundai and Maida 
537 5049 



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COMf>REHENSiVE MAJOR 
Medical Coverage lor short 
or continuous terms for 
more inforniation call 
539-6949 

LOSE 37% MORI 

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SBD 



EIUPLOYMENT/C&REERS 



Molp Wantod 

Manhattan City OnU- 
iwiKa 4S14 assure* 
•very person equal o^ 
panunfty in eacuring 
arKi holding employ- 
ment in any field of 
worli or labor tot which 
hW she is properly i|itall- 
fled revardtes* of race, 
sea, military status, (Ha* 
Bbtlrty, rvlti|li>n, age, 
color, national or%ln or 
ancoetry Vioietions 
should Ise reported to 
the Director of Human 
Reeowroae at Ctty Hall, 
B37-40M, 

The Cotlegian cannot 
verlhr the finerKlal IM- 
tentlel of advertise- 
ments in the Employe 
ment/Cereer classifica- 
tion. Reoilers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
euoh employment op- 
ponuriiTy with reason- 
able caution. The Col- 
legian urges our read- 
ors lo contact the Bet- 
ter SumlnesB Bureau, 
•01 SE Jefferson, To> 
peha. KS Ma07-11S0. 
tVISIlU-OAM. 



'•♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦»SS»»' 

iEXCITIKGii 

Part-Time:; 
iiEmploymentj; 

.Jdin the Viilii Lltii- 

triiin, rrprcsdilliiK 

(tiir priKliKi iitirl 

scrvlrcs In the 

Manhultari Dillon 

FtxKl Store Ftcxlhie 

hoiirH. 20 hoLirti per 

wrck mlntiniint, 

Halury pltiii 

rotnmlAMlotT, 

( 'iill ttfiicly StiudFr, 

I TH,"! 5.17 5 1 e« 

Valu Linr, The 

Tclriilirmt? Company. 

EXJK 



CAfilNiEVER 



CURE 



S21 OOi' HOUR Our top tel 
esales rep* rnaka that 
motich and irtorel We also 
oftar bonelita, inside and 
outside poeltiona, paid tain- 
ing, and oppod unity for 
advar>camant, Wt prom 
cite talent Irom within lite 
orgenzelion Ws are seek 
ir>g five individuals to till 
positions that heva opened 



due lo growth. Ws have 
fulland part time potittons 
available Call <913) 
492 7750, ask for Mr Mil 
ton. 

$1500 WEEKLY poteftliel 
mailing our circulars No 
Enperience Required. Free 
information pecket . Call 
410 783 B272 

1600. WEEKLY Sti per 

envelofie. Send siHf ad 
dressed stamped envet 
ope CMA. PO Bon 13486. 
Atlanta, Georgia 30324 E 
mail GENMAR 
KETi3^arjl.cum 

ADMINISTRATIVE AS- 
SISTANTS Adminislratlve 
assistant needed lor last 
paced construction office 
In the Manhattan/ Ft Riliry 
area stadmg Eiecember 
1997 Must his able to 
work independently and 
well with others. General 
duties include: Typing cor 
reepondence, reports, con 
tracts, etc, Payroli. invorc 
es. Maintaining chedi 
book, certified (layroll, an 
swering phones, filing and 
purchasing supplies for the 
office. ENperierKe in Mi 
CrosoftWindowi95, Lotus 
123 and AS 400 a plus Sal 
ary commensurate with an 
perienca Please send re 
sume to MA Mottenson, 
PO Box 1546, Culumtua, 
MO 65205, Attn : Dale Het 
er 

ARRANGE YOUR Spring 
semester joh now, Kaw 
Valley Greenhouse, Irvc. is 
interviewing now to start 
in Oecemtier, January or 
February Enjoyebla work 
atmosphere, competitive 
pay and opportunity Call 
776-8585 between 3 00 and 
4:30p-m 

BASE PLUS COMMIS 
SION First year earnings 
can exceed S46,000 Fitst 
month earnings can 
e(ceedS4000l We are for- 
tune 500 company grow 
ing locally in Lenexa We 
ere seeking talented indi 
viduals to fill positions in 
our sales department We 
offer: $19,000- $22,000 
t>ase, weekly commissions, 
no travel, lull benelils, op- 
portunity for ativance- 
menti II you are intareeed 
in more inlorrriatlon or 
would like a phone inter 
view, please cell (9131 
492-8780 and ask tor Ken 
ny 

CAN WfE TALK 2 Want a 
pan-time job that pays full 
time7Want a gtiaranleed 
hourly wage, plus bonus 
es7Tt>en call met M- F 
Ip.m- 9p.m., 587-4114 ask 
for Sharon 

EARN FIIEETmrS ft 

CASHt CLASS TRAVEL 
needs students to promote 
Spring Break 19961 Sell 15 
tnps & travel treel MtoMy 
motivated studants can 
•em a Fraa trip S ovar 
SIOJKWt Choose Can 
cun, Bahamas, Mazailan, 
Jamaica, or Floridai North 
America's largest student 
tour oi»raior I Call Now I 
1 800 838 6411 

IN HOME care needed lor 
Senior Cit+ren, 7- 11 or 7- 
3 Call 776 2082, 5- 9pm 
or leave inessage 

tOOKINO FOR THE PER- 
FECT SUMMER JOB? 

Deveiuf> luadfu ship skills 
and gain exfierisnce im 
plam#itting communtty 
protects For more infor 
mstion call the Community 
Service Program at 532 
570T 

MULT1 MEDIA STUD- 
ENT ASSISTANT. Pro 
duce websites, videos and 
other multi media. Need 
relevant computer super i- 
enco: prefer communica 
tions related maior 10-20 
hour/ week Apply 148 Ws 
ters Hall 

PART TIME WORK lot col 
lege students Mike your 
own schedule Earnupto 
$50 $3001 per week Prov 
en resume iMiikler lot ell 
majors. Sctiolerships, in 
terships. Co ops available 
Conditions sf>ply Work in 
Manhattan Intarviirw at 
personnel oKica inTopeka 
Call (7861228-1144 M F 
12 4pm 

HAOULS ESCONDIDOS- 
Now accepting applications 
lor servers and cooks- 
Apply Monday Friday bet 
ween 2p m. 4pm 715 
Seth Child Road 

THE KANSAS STATE COL 
LEGIAN. K State's sludant 
prixlucad daily new«pa|>er, 
is now accepting applica 
lions for spring 1998, posi 
lions in advertising snd 
news. Included are paid po 
art ions in advertising sate*, 
reporting, copy editing, 
pholO|Ourn«lism, graphics, 
ad and electronic publiih 
ing It* I greet opporrunny 
to applv your skill* and 
gain IrtvaluabI* hands on 
experience. Applications 
end more information are 
availabi* in Kedf le 103 Ap 
plications are due 5 p.m 
Wadrwsday, Nov 17 

THOROUGH HOUSE claan 
ing lor couple with no pets, 
smoking, ctiildren flexible 
tdiadula Adjacent to com 
put. RaepoiKt with letter 
end qualincatiOfn lo Cot 
leglen Ixni 1, 



WANTED: MOTIVATED, 
reliable person to work full 
time on diversified crop 
farm E xpenence with 
farm equiptmenl, croppirtg 
operations and shop work 
are needed Good pay lor 
night person 25 miles 
northeast at Manhattan, 
1785)457-3446 

WAf^TED: SAMTACIau* 
Mature people needed for 
professional Santa Claus 
assignment. Good with 
children and able to work 
four and one half hour*, 
day and evening shift 
weekdays or weekenits: 
November 22 December 
24, Experience helpful, but 
natural Santa personality 
most imiiortant. Call Re- 
llactions Photograplty M 
53»-1S50 

WANTED: SANTA'S help- 
ers Must be good with 
children Weekday and we- 
kend shitis ivsilable Musi 
be evaileble November 22 
December 24 Call Raflec 
tions Pttatography at 
539-1560. 

uo| 

BuslnosB 
Opportynlttos 

The Collegian cannot 
verify the linencial po- 
tential of advertise- 
ments in the EmploY- 
ment/Cereer classlfico- 
Hon- Reerlars ara od- 
vieed to appcoech arry 
such business oppor- 
tunity wittr reasonable 
ceution-The Coilegilan 
iw||es our readers to 
contact tha Sattor Suei- 
nee* Bureau, SOI SC 
Jeff erson. Topehe, KS 
•e«07 11M. 
191 31232 -OU4. 

DESIGN AND coordinate 
odvedising lor antional me. 
die. monthly meltings, dai- 
ly assignments, for ag 
gressive mail order com- 
pany Pay IS comma* urate 
with ability. Send resume 
to Golden Sea Graphu:*, 
PO Box 36, Greenleaf, KS 
66S43. 

EARN UPTO ttOOO per 

month from your home 
selling our products. Call 
Apolion Computers at 
<S88)9aO-2003 to apply. No 
experience rveeded- 




410 



He ma for 8alo 

19M ROYAL PURPLEI 
Purcheee orke toiJaY. 
Stop by 103 Kedzie. 
Suy novv for only 
S34,9C, 

ANTIQUES. COLLECTI- 
BLES, tools. t>ooks, furni 
ture, estate jewelry, btter 
signs, thousand* of curt 
Dus goods Time Machine 
Antique Maul anti Flea 
Market. 4910 Skyway Dr 
between Briggs and air 
port 539 4684 

CABLE DESCRAMBLER kit 
$14 95 See all the premi 
um and pay per view Chen 
nels 18001752-1389 

COOK BOOKS, Vintage li 
i:ensa tags, ervcyc loped la's, 
black meniorabilia, church 
windows, oriental furnitur 
and potery. Vintage rr>aga- 
rines. books, religuous, 
hats, radios, clocks, auto, 
tools, cameree, albums, fur- 
ntture, txrtety, estate jew 
eiry. American heritage 
tx>oks, movie stills, tavern 
stuff, brass, trunks, mili 
tary. tins, steins. SO's furni 
ture, ftute, prints, floor 
lamps, new cer trailor 
S 1499. new Sx 9 tilt trallier 
S599. 8O00 5(|uare leet of 
curious goods Time Ma 
diiiie Antique and Flea 
Market. 49 10 Sk yway Dt- 
belween airport and 
Biiggs Visa, MaslirCard, 
layaway 539-4684 open 
IJOOp.m 5:00p m TuM- 
day thru Saliirday 

K-STATE PURPLE or 
OOLDOLrTTtR 100 

pound drums, 175' drum, 
you haul samples 785 



843 1605, lorcade@lcom- 
pu serve com 

SELLING ALL my oil paint- 
ing stuff Sonw fww, some 
used Call 776-5999 

WATEBBED MATRESS 
King sua with wave reduc 
tion Cost $360 will sell 
ft 75- 1800-3972436 then 
8745117 

WWW SUPERIOR A 
CUBA COM VIEW our en 
tire line of new AND pre 
owned Acure's Ask for Pa 
tridt J Sterner tt rated 
Acura web site in the na- 
tion i 

41S| 

Furnlturo to 
Buy/Sail 

ABARTME^n SIZE freeier. 
futon, bar. bar stools, beer 
signs, keg cooler/ tapper, 
desk, sofa, dining set. an 
tertalnrtient center, atm 
puter desk, miecoltaneou*. 
539-3119 

JERRY'S WHOLESALE 
CARPET Carpet remnants 
and vinyl remnants. 504 
Yuma Monday- Friday. 
8:30a-m - 5:30pm Sal 
8a.m.- 17p.m Open to the 
public. 

4H| 



Computfs 

MONITOR REFVMR. quick 
and reliable service. Free 
pick up and delivery. Call 
Inland 776-0311 

PACKARD BELL Psntium 
t20MHZ leMBRAM. 78.8 
modem, 4XCD 15 inch 
monitor, $800, call Kelby 
between 7p.m. lOp.m . 
S65-0281. 




Airtomebllos 



1991 CHEWS 10. 67K, 
4 3LV6, automatic, anrt- 
locfc brake system, cruise, 
sir conditioning, clean, 
very dependable, new 
tires, shocks, brake*. 
$6900, 565-9'20 

FOR SALE Chevy 350 en 
gine, fourlierral, automat- 
ic transmission. Tube heed- 
ers, $275 or boel odor, or 

separately. Call Matt at 
587-9498 or (785)456 7316 

FOR SALE: T992 Eagle 
TslonTsi Excellini condi 
Hon, call Tare at 539 8088 
for detail* 

PAINT rr PURPLE per 

tect lor tailgate, all equiped 
1979 Winnebago motor 
home, good condition 73K, 
reasonable. B3^-47S3. 

s»| 



Blcyclos 



TREK V23 FRAME. 

brand fiew. many Shimand 
accessorrns. Roc* Sho« 
Great tiiiii< $1500 or ti^si 
offer Call nb 4176 



930 1 



Motorcyclos 



S4ippOo» 



BABY UMBRELLAS. Blue 
and gold Macaws. Hahnns 
Macaws, sweet, fun, cuddly 
rare Love Birds, Codtatile*. 
539-1177 



1967 KAWASAKI, 7K actu 
al miles, black, with wind- 
shield, helmet and parkir>g 
permit Very good condi 
tion $1000 539 5084 

1989 NIN JA 600fl Jetted, 
custom pipes, bra. extras 
Runs great, $1850 or best 
offer, 539-8925 

FOR SALE Yamaha 1992 
Seca. red, sharp, $7999 or 
best offer 539 0293 




TRAVEL/TRIPS 



aOVEfUIA4ENT SUR 
PL U St I Camouriage cloth- 
ing, tx>ots, rainwear, wool 
clothing Also CARHAfTTT 
WORK WEAR Monday 
Friday 9a.m 5;30p-m Sal 
urday9a,m 5pm SL 
Marys Surplus Sales, St, 
Marys, Kansas, 1 7 SSI 437 
2734. 

WANTED TO buy: used 
Duck Decoys Call [>ave 
&87-9T6B 



Ttekots to 

»4iy/»all 

KU AND CU general ad 
miesion for *ele Both lor 
$100. or tiesl offer, call 
776-8599 

TICKETS WANTED KSU- 
Colorado football game- 
Student section or other. 
Will buy one or two Call 
collect 17851331-2031 
10a m Spin or (7861841 
5394 9p m lOa m 



Spring 
Braak 



SPRtNO SREAK SO- Ma 

/atlan with College Tour* 
Airfare, seven nights hotel, 
transfers, parties. For 
brochure or earning FREE 
trip 1 800 J9*-4896 
(www ccllegetours.comi 



I' Free 
food and dnnksi Cancun, 
Bahamas, Jamaica and 
Florida from- $399 Orgen- 
ire a small group and trov' 
el Ireei Highest commi*. 
sions and lowest pricesi 
Call Surf Al SunTours to 
become a campus repre 
santalive 18001574-7577 

"SPRING BREAK Take 
2"* Hiring Repsl Sell 15.., 
Take 2 Free Hottest Desti 
natior^l Free Pa dies. Eats 
and Drinks SunSplastt 1 
800 426 7710 



Chase Manhattan 
Apartments 

Comer of College and 
ClaDin, Manhattatr 

$V6*o*off"" '* 

semester leases 

* 1,3,3 ar 4 Bedroom Units ^ 

k'DecK/Patios for each unit oEi 

'On-site Gym. Pool, ft Laundry ^ 

''Covered Parking 

CALL TODAYH 
(785) 776-3663 



Meet your mate 



Want to meet that cute guy] 
in your anatomy class? 
Advertise in the Collegian 
personals. You'll meet your 
match in no time. 



Kansas State Collegian 

103 Kedzie (east of the Union) 532-6555 




ClossifiedRATES 

lOAr 

20 wofdi or less 

t7 15 

eoctt woriJ over 20 

1.20 par word 

aiMcrs 

30 wofdi o< teit 

(8 40 

Bodi word over 20 

$.23 pef worci 

3 DAYS 

20 wordi (X less 
J9 45 

each word over 20 
$.30 per word 

4 DAYS 

20 words Of last 

tt020 

Bdch word ov«r 20 

$.35 pet word 

5 DAYS 

20 woids or leu 

$10.70 

ȣ>ch word OYtr 20 

$40 per word 

( coiiMci/five day role ) 



HOW TO PAY 

All clasiilieds rruil be 

pod m odvotice unless 

you hove on account 

wilh SfudeiM 

Publications tnc 

Coih, checli, 

MoslerCard or Visa gre 

occepled There is a 

$10 service cirargeon 

oil returned checks 

Wte reserve the right lo 

edit, reiect or properly 

cbuiFy ony od 



FUE FOUND ADS 

Ai o service to you, we 

run lound adt br ifiree 

days free of charge. 



COtRECTfONS 

1 ^ M on ertor in' 
your od, please coll us 
\A% (xcepf rMponiibili 

ty only for th* fifjl 
wrong itiisriion 



CANCtUATTONS 

If you sell yiMr ilem 

before your od has 

exprred. we will relund 

you (or the remoininc 

doyt Vou rriujt coH t . 

before noort ihe day 

before ihe od is lo b« 

published 



tHADUNES 

Foi on eirtro chgrge. 

w«'ll put a fieodline 
obove your od to cofcli 
the reader's altenlion 



OQO 



BULLETIN BOARD 



HOUSING nCAL ESTATC 




EMPLOVMEMf CAAEf RS 



K 




tPAHSPORTATtOM 



Mfoi 



TRAVEL/TRIPS 



TO HACE AN AD 

GoloK«dtftl03 
(ixrou from ihe JC^Stole 

SludwtUn»on| Offiea 
houn ore Monday 

thioiigh Fritloy (fan S 
o.fn. to i p.m. The 

ofnce It opift mcipt 
on hotidoys 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEOIAN 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1997 



Election 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Jstalion. Il \^'as mure of un Innaccnl 
appeal to try lo gci more studcnis 
involvwl" 

SGA Altorney Cicnt-ral Bryan 
Wagner s<iid if the election a'sults are 
eonie<itcd as a result of the new int'orma- 
lion. he would be w filing lo take the 
issue befoK Student Tribunal 

"ir it is something the students I'cel 
should be addressed. I ha\e no problent 
giving il to Student Tribunal lo work oui. 
It's not in my hands to deeidc whether 
this giMTs ihrouyli or not." he said, 

Hul later in the interview. Wagner 
explained that Tribunal members aa* 
appointed b) elected S(iA ofTicials. 
When asked tf I hat «oidt) make them 



unable to determine whether or nol the 

elections were valid Wagner said, "1 
guess thai would be righi" 

He said if election results were con- 
icsicd decisions about how to handle the 
problem might he deferred to the OITice 
of Student Life, which wersees S(r.A. 

Assistant Dean of Student I ife Jon 
Ktilaga W'oirtd not comment late 
Wednesday afternoim Kulaga said he 
had just heard about the mistake and 
would need time lo review legislation 
before making a staienieni 

Loi)king lo fuluiv cleelions. Student 
Senate will consider a revised set of 
election regulations at lonighl's meeting 
The new set oi rules sets polling places 
at Ihe K-State Student IJnion, IX'rhy 
Iimh) I'enter and Kramer foinl tenter, 
repealing previous regulations 

Nexi nionth's stadium expansion 



will not be afftctcd by the oversight II 

was dciiigned v^'ilh polls at Ihc Union 
and Veterinary Medicine Complex, 
which complies with the 1990 bill 

In the end. Carney said the intent of 
adding polling places was to encourage 
student participation However, proce- 
dure was violated, and if Senate follows 
the "letter of the law," previous elections 
have been invalid, he said. 

"Were the elections valid'' That's in 
definite question. Obviously, the elec- 
tion guidelines weren't even followed by 
the I- lection Commit tee l hem selves," 
t'ariiey said. "But I don't think any can- 
didate was at an advantage or disadvan- 
tage. The overall inlent was to get moa' 
students lo vote. 

"I don't think any harm v*as done. It's 
just a question of us tinl lowing proce- 
dures thai we set out for ourselves" 



Urge 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

However, he first pul ihc projectii in con- 
text by inlroducing the cily of 
Johannesburg. South Africa, where all 
the projects were built. Nocro practices 
arch i lecture in South Africa but lives in 
Si. Louis. 

The slides illustrated a modem inter- 
national city torn between the corrugat- 
ed steel shanty towns of the suburbs, and 
the concrete and steel towers of the cen- 
tral city Noero emplwsi/ed thai archi- 
tect sec iheif roles as much larger in 
South A frica as hav ing a direct effect 
on peoples' lives. 

He said 4.S perccnl ivf all housing in 
South Africa is built bv squallers on pri- 
vate property using east-off materials. 

"There's a fantastic vitality in ihcse 
areas ihat is almost contpleiely absent in 
all planned communities I've seen here," 



NiK-ro said adding that the shanty towns 
eMsl, however m cxircme poverty He 
cnlici/ed Ihe over-hyped Nev* lirbanism 
of Seaside and Celehraiion. Ha., as san- 
itized villages lacking the happenstance, 
ihiid qualities of Souih African villages 
. To address the poverty ol his country 
while keeping true lo his principles. 
Noero designs small houses, shops and 
public buildings that use basic hard- 
ware-store materials and are assembled 
by untrained locals None of his com- 
pleted projects is air<ondilioned or 
healed an aspect ihal seems almost 
unthinkable in iIk I 'mled Stales 

Nt>ero said architects must capital i/e 
on local technology, climate ami tradi- 
tion because buildings must take cues 
from how people live at home 

He said buildings should be readable, 
ill both construction and purpose, so 
people find them accessible And yet 
none of NiKro's projects lacked what 
could be convent lima I Iv considered 



style. 

"The local hardware store becomes 

Ihe source of architectural invention," 
Nocro said 

A small home for a friend is simpli- 
fied with pitched roofs, geomeirie win- 
dows and basic forms, (dass and open- 
ings ar^ pi)silioned to take advantage of 
wind and sun, winter and summer 
weather. Nocro's eihos is for a loose 
architecture working with the local cli- 
mate, not against it. 

The very idea of a climate-controlled 
modernist bos. like Throik morion Hall. 
beconK's ludicious. because of the initial 
cost and the resources such a building 
requires 

If NtK'ro was a bit harsh on Ihe 
Warhol ian superstars of modern iiichi- 
lecture, he's coming from a dinercnt 
political and siKial env ironmeni. Surely 
if there were a way lo have exported 
Philip Johnson lo South Africa, someone 
would have found a way 




Pass the sugar, 
he online edition of the 
llegian is Java enhanced. 

Check it out. 

collegian.ksu.edu 



Food drive 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 

hmcrson said 

For those who feci they don't have 
time 10 volunteer for the food drive, 
they can help by giving a donation or a 
couple of cans. 

Canned goods and other nonpcnsh- 
ablcs may be dcpoiiitcd in the large can- 



islets ihal will soon be placed a( both 
Dillons grocery stores in Manhattan 

If deciding what to buy i.s a prob- 
lem, just think of a holiday meal, 
Bramhall said. 

"If they just think of what goes into 
a Thanksgiving or Christmas meal, Ihey 
just need to pick up one or two of those 
items," she said. 

(. ats for Cans accepts cash dona- 
tions. 



"Cash is great loo. because it can 
help buy turkeys and chickens 

"For every dollar ihnl's donated we 
can turn ii inio $7 worth of food" she 
said 

Cats for Cans will continue through- 
out Ihc fall semester and all food col- 
lected stays in Riley t ounty, she said 

"It's so ama/ing lo watch things 
happen Cats for Cans has so much 
energy." Bramhall said 



Jones 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 

Three slate troopers who have said 

they helped arrange sexual Irysis for 
Clinton when he was governor are 
scheduled to give deposilton.s next 



week. 

I'linton lawyer Rob Bennelt on 
Monday asked U.S. District Judge 
Susan Webber Wnghi to delay or halt 
questioning ihal he said was designed 
to harass and embarrass the president. 

Ihe judge im^k ihe request under 
advisement alter a phone conference 



Monday night. She also ordered 
everyone involved m the case to stop 
talking about il publicly. 

"The judge has concerns lo make 
sure that the jury panel thai hears this 
case is n»ti atfeeted by pretrial public- 
ity," said Bnsiow. Ferguson's lawyer. 
I le declined further comment 



Bayer STorc 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

Wischmcycr 

The competition was judged by 
Helen Maib, a Lawrence architect, 
Spircy and Noero, Noero presented the 
lecture "The Ghost of Culture: 
Reasserting First Pnnciplcs" after the 
ceremony at 6:30 p.m. 

Mark Shapiro, head of the 



Dcpartmenl of Archiieciutc. s.iid ilic 
competition allows students to look at 
the implications of stone as a building 
material. 

"It's very seldom the case thai stu- 
dents are asked to look at the application 
of a building material in any detail," 
Shapiro said 

Max Hayet, wner o! Bayer Stone, 
said his mam goal with sponsoring 
the competiiion is to pul forward 
some money for a pri/e and sec if 



Theories 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

seam. 

Il loms nut officials from the 
NH hypnotized the players from 
ihe Orioles and the Atlanta Braves 
be Tore the league championships 
and forced them to lose to Cleveland 
and Florida. 

Why, you ask'.' 

The majority of the fans wanted 
to see a Braves vs f)rioles maich-up 
in the World Series, hul the NFL 
stopped It from happening lo keep 
baschall's popularity low and 
football the most popular sp«)rt in 
the country. 

But the NFL's plan partly 
backfired when the scries ended 
in exciting fashion in the llth 
inning of ihc seventh game. 

The final conspiracy is still a 
wofk in prt>gress. The sentencing 
of Marv Albert, former basket- 
ball announcer for NBC and the 
New York Knicks, was post- 
poned for one year, and the 
charges stemming from the bit- 



ing incident will be dropped at ihal 

lime if he slays out of trouble and 

seeks counseling 
It sounds awfully fishy lo me thai 

the judge would lei Albert go w ith* 
oul any jail lime. 

To be honest, I'm kind of nervous 
about writing this column because 
I'm afraid I might end up m cemcni 
shoes at the bottom of Tuille Creek 
Reservoir if one of these theories 
turns out to be true. I guess 1 should 
look on the brighl side Maybe I'll 
get lo find out what happened ut 
Jimmy Hoffa. 



stLidenls can come up with new and 
unusual ways lo uh' stone 

"We're li)oking if we can provide a 
service lo these students they can't get 
another way," Bayer said. "We a^mind 
these aahitects thete are certain unique 
pmblems and benefits this slone has 
rather than man-made products, and 
books don't have the answers" 



Prt'j^ nancy 
lestiny Center 

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Sunday Evening 

Service for 

KSU Students 

Every Sunday at 5 p.m. 

First Presbyterian 
Church of Manhattan 

801 Leavenworth 

Live Jazz Band, powerful 
drama, stimulating message! 

FREE Dinner 

will follow every service! 

If you need a ride call 537-0518 

Directions from the old football stadium (comer of 

Denison & Anderson). East on Anderson, turn right on 

1 1 th Street, left on Leavenworth, go 3 blocks to church on 

the corner of 8th & l^avenworlh. 



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Loaded Nachos $3,49 

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10? N. 3rd 
Manhattan, KS 

776-9879 

Your downtown 

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tradition *»ince 1951 



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Public: $U». Seniors; $14. Studmts: $K 

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l.etttTinan, ai the Kennedy Onter and who will perforin latur this 
season at Disney's New Virlnry 'llieatre in New York. 

R. Carlos Nokoi ond Potar Katar 

l-riday, November 14. Mp m 

I'ubljf $18 Seniors: Slf. Sludentii:$9 

Thrill to music that tran.srends tJie boundarlns of cultures and time 
when German planiNt Peier Kater and Native American fluilsi I! 
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BY YOURSILF ON HALLOWEEN 
WITH NOTHING TO DO? 

^ Brandi HeHig <^'^e') ^^^ odvice on what lo do in 
ManhoWon when yoy're lame ond having nothing 
else to do. 

Se« OPINION, Pag« 4 



£loclay' 



rn toddy's popar 

Briefi 2 

Diveriioni 7 

In Mondoy'i pOfMr 
K-Slote ''I Texas Tech 
foofbalt coverage 



DICK VITALE KICKS OFF HOOPS 
SEASON WITH FRIGHT NIGHT 

^ ESPN commentotOF and basketball onalyst , ^.,,^1^ 
joined both men's and womeni leojns to Vort the 
season. 

See SPOffT$, Page 6 



OcioMe3), 1997 
FRIDAY 




HIGH 65 

LOW 45 

'*■';;■'/ cl <id|f W'"> 
.1 welt wind f'ljrti 
tOio20mph 
Tontght, a »ligKl 
cHonee for foio 



RtCHT. THE NEW CHIMP 

HOUSE at Sunset Zoological 

Park IS neoring thelinol 

itoges ol construction The 

new chimpanzee exhibit will 

be open to the public on 

Saturdoy 

SHOW RACHAEL nurses 

Tevoni, one of her twini born 

in June t996 





Tao.ra,oxika 





UIXY li about 42 yon 
old and hot been at the 
Sunicl Zoo for 23 years 
Her new home at the zoo 
hot three dent, on exerciie 
room, and ttoroge and 
foo^prepo ration ortoi. 

^OVI,' WE HAVE AN 

APPROPRIATE INDOOR 

EXHIBIT, AS WELL AS 

A PLACE TO KEEP OUR 

COLOBUS ANDBLLIF 

MONKEYS.?^ 

Amtt Fenstermaihu. 

ini'i' II IK 



flMV Wt KMI ROM 
HiOTM tY IVAN KOZAR 



he Sunset Zoological Park will open 
the addition of the Chimpan/ecs of 
Tanganyika exhibit this weekend 

These African ehimparj/ccs 
include Suzy, who is about 42. 
Rachacl. 23; Big Mac, born in the 
wild; and Teeoni and Tcetoo, both 16 
month i> old. They have not been able 
to roam around ouisiide since they 
arrived at the Sunset Zoo. 

The building that housed them way 
an indoor facility, so it prevented them 
from roaming out hide 

The new facility has a 6,S27- 
aquare-fooi outdoor habitat area. The 
outitidc also hat a window- viewing 
area for visitors. 

There will be an Indoor exhibit 
measuring 2,000 square feet. The 
indoor exhibit will have three dens, an 
exerclK room, and itorage and food* 
preparation areas. 

"The previous exhibit was sub- 
standard It didn't provide the animals 
outside accessibility," Angle 
Fenstermacher, Sunset Zoo marketing 
director, said. "The rooms inside uere 
not that roomy for the animals, either." 

The dens will give the zoo the abil' 
ity to iqMiate chimptnzeei more effi- 
ciently for medical pmccdures. man- 
agement and new chimpianzce intro- 
ductions. 

"Now we have an appropriate 
indoor exhibit, as well as a place to 
keep our colobus and blue monkeys," 
Fenstermacher said. 

Fenstermacher said iw ofTicials 
hoped to have an indoor holding and 
viewing facility for the colobus and 
hluf monkeys completed by spnng 



1W8 

The chimp exhibit is the first addi- 
tion to the African Forest Trail. The 
trail will create an Afncan atmosphere 
for zoo guests with tropical landscap- 
ing and plants The habitat will help 
make the chimps feel more at home, 
she said 

"When It gets cold outside, the 
chimps can choose if they want to go 
outside or slay inside and stay warm," 
Fenstermacher said. 

Fenstermacher said additional arti- 
ficial lighting will be set on timers, 
which will simulate longer day length 
allowing the chimpan^ccn to experi- 
ence lighting a» they would m equato* 
rial Africa. 

Scott Shoemaker, Sunaet Zoo 
director, uid he has high h^^tea for the 
new exhibit 

"Right now we arc in accredited 
and kgitimale jtoo. but with this addi- 
tion 1 (hmk people will be attracted to 
the new exhibit and see the zoo in t 
new light," he said. 

The estimated cost of the trail and 
exhibit IS S60(),(](H). 

The zoo has raised more than 
S60,000 through public iponsonhips 
of the bncks used to build the exhibit. 
Sponsors had the opportunity to have 
an inscription of their choice engraved 
on the bnck Funding for the rest of 
the exhibit will be paid off through 
admission fees, gift shop and coiKet- 
sion sales, and charitable gifts. 

The grand opening for the African 
Forest Trail and Chimpanzees of 
Tanganyika will be Saturday and 
Sunday from K) am to 5:10 p m 



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pvni yOrtf* 









«MKI INOIlHAtDt/ 



Halloween 
opportunities 
abound In 
Manhattan 



ASHUY VOUlf 

t[jlT reporter 

Halloween is celebrated cvcr> year b> kids 
of all ages. No matter what day of the ^^eck. 
Uci 31 IS a night filled with ghosts, custumes, 
face paint and candy, 

Halloween has its origins in the Catholic 
church, dating back to the Itflh century B.C 
The word "ffallowecn" comes from a con- 
tracted corruption of All Ifalhius F.vc All 
HallowN Day is aKo known as All Saint's Day, 
and it is celebrated Nm. 1 It is a ( ".itholic day 
of observance in honor ot'satnis. accordiiii! to 
"History and t ustiims of Halloween." by 
/c rry W j 1 son a t H i7(f (ir M i-f Ao ffr ) on /r/m 

tiniwing nut of rituals of Irish t elts cele- 
brating a nc\* year and out of medieval prayer 
rituals o( l-.uropeuns. Halloween ts still a pop- 
ular bolulay 

This year there are many opportunities to 
get involved with Halkmeen The K -State 

See HAUOWEEN, Poge 10 



Chinese president Jiang Zemin defends 
human rights practices during summit 



UIOCUTtD PMSI 

WASHINGTON. D.C. - Facing a 
sp'Tond da> of viithert;ig criticism, 
thmese President Jiang Zemm dclended 
his human rights record to hostile law- 
makers Thursday 
and later vowed to 
open China w ider 
to the outside 
world 

In back-to-back 
appearances before 
ka^ ing ^'ashmgion 
for a tour of 
America, Jiang 
tncd to deflect 
attacks that began 
Wednesday with 
President Clinton 

"Wc believe without democracy, there 
can K' no mtxJerni/ation," Jiang said to 
Asian specialists at a luncheon "Wc will 
further improve our pattern of openness 
... develop an open economy and open 
China still wider to the outside world " 

The words of assurance were ringing 




Jiang 



hollow in Congress, where lawmakers 
asked China s president about repression 
in Titici and abortions The confrontation 
came a day afler Clinlon said Beijing uas 
"on the wrong side o( history." 

"He got it from the president, and 
now he got it from Congress," flouse 
Minority Leader Dick Gephardt. D-Mo,. 
said after lawmakers met with Jiang. 

The Chinese president told members 
of tongress that, since his country 
opened to the world in the 1^7(K, "the 
Chinese people ha\e enjoveda much bet- 
ter life, and it has intensified ciTons to 
improve democracy and the legal sys- 
tem." He urged cfl'orls in improv ing and 
developing China-L .S relations 

.Although several lawmakers toasted 
Jiang at Wednesday nights White House 
state dinner, like Clinton, they obvirnisly 
didn't mmce words \^iih him 

Jiang responded ai the luncheon, say- 
ing, "DifTcrcnt views held by toumries 
on the human rights issue ought to be 
addressed through dialogue so confronta- 
tion could be avoided " 

He issued a similar han4s-ofT warning 



to Clinton a day earlier, saying at a con- 
tentious news conference thai China and 
the United States must have mutual 
respect for each others* viilues 

On the sensitive issue of lilsei, Jiang 
compared his country's action!* to the lib- 
eration of American slaves "People there 
are living in happiness and contentment," 
he said. 

Again and again, the Chinese presi- 
dent offered democratic bromides, 
promising modem enterprise, a modern- 
ization drive and elTorts to further 
enlarge demixracy. At the same time, he 
talked about turning "China into a sMiial- 
ist country ruled b> law " 

One of China's harshest critics. Rep 
Nancy Pelosi. IK'alif. said Jiang was 
evasive in his responses about forced 
abortion to curtail population growih. 
Tibet, religious persecution and weapons 
proliferation 

Jiang denied that China forces women 
to have abonions and said the govern- 
ment protects religious freedom and bars 
the sale of human orgaas for transplants. 
Rep Chrts Smith. R-N.J . said 



Boeing signs $3 billion contract with China 



WASHINGTON, DC - In acefc- 
bratory Commerce Department cere- 
mony. Boeing signed a $3 billion con- 
tract Thursday to sell China 50 jetlin- 
ers, the largcn aviation deal in the com- 
munist country's history 

President Clinton and Chinese 
President Jiang Zemin hailed the deal 
cm Wednesday during their summit 
mcetini at the White House 

"TMa contract will support tetis of 
thouundi of American job* and pro- 
vide China with a modern fleet of paa- 
lenger planes," Cfinton siud during his 
joint news conference with Jiang, 



"Chini is the bstest-grcwing market m 
the worid for our gon<ls and services " 

Ron Woodard, president of Boeing 
Commercial Airplane Group, and ■ 
Chinese aviation official signed the 
contract with Commerce Secretary 
William Dtley and senior Chinese gov- 
ernment ofTicials looking on. Scores of 
employees ftom Boeing subcontiictora 
in 42 states cheered in a Commerce 
Department b«llroom decorated with 
miniature U.S. and Chinese flags and 
re4 white and btuc btllooiu. 

"This IK a great moment," satd Phtl 
Conduit, Seattle-based Boeing Co.'i 
chairman and chief executive oflicer. 
"The key tn Boeitif 's ttKceas m wtui, I 



believe, will be the global century is 
opemrsde." 

The deal, involving the sale of one 
747. five 757s. eight 777s and 36 737s. 
could be a "turning point in U.S.-China 
trade," Daley said 

"It's a strong signal that China 
wants to build a stronger commercial 
retatioflship with the US, one bawd on 
cooperation and mutual benefits," he 
said "It's a critical step in addressing 
otir tntdc imbalance." 

Chen Gunigyi. minister of general 
adminiilration for the CimI Aviation of 
China, lifted for China He called the 
signing 'Ihe largest tnulc event in the 
history of China aviatiotJ " 



Senate rejects salary increases for SGA 



TUm 0. UNKIMI 

Back to the drawing board 

That's the message Student Senators 
KPt to Student Governing Association's 
Joint Committee on Officer 
Compensation at Thunday night's Senate 
meeting. 

On a 32-22 vote. Senate rejected the 
committee's report, which recommended 
compensation raises for several SGA 
positions 

Lengthy debate surrounded the reso- 
lution to reject Ihe committee's report, 
which recommended pay increases for 
Senate officers, committee chairs and 
others within SGA 

Allocations Committee Chair Gabe 
Eckert, one of the resolution's authors, 
said K-Staie's student goscmmcnt is 



already successful without a pay rai,sc. 

"Two out of the past three years, our 
student government has been ranked as 
No. 1 for universities with IU,0()0 or 
more students, but our university holds 
another record which 1 am also very 
proud of And that is that we are one of 
the lowest-compensated student govern- 
ments in the nation," Eckert said 

[debaters on both sides of the issue 
raised issues of elitism, citing concerns 
tliai low salaries keep students from scrv ■ 
ing in SGA. But high salaries, others 
said could lead to fee increases, which 
might keep potential students from 
attending K-State 

Engmecrmg Sen Carlton Getz. argu- 
ing for Ihe increase, said low pay pre- 
vented stuifents from considering service 
in SGA. 



"By not giving a level of compensa- 
tion, we're forcing other students out We 
come here today and we say we have to 
make SGA as inclusive as possible. 

"But yet to those who have to hold a 
job, we say, 'Huh-uh You can run for 
office, but we can't pay you enough to 
give your best to this university Go on. 
Get a job. because wc can't pay you 
enough to stay.'" he said. 

Aubrey Abbott, a member of the 
committee, said low salaries further stu- 
dents' opinions that SGA is clitist 

"Student government gets slammed a 
lot for not being diverse and not repre- 
senting students, but I feel like by not 
compensating, we're excluding a lot ol 
students. 

Sm UNATI, Page 10 



DEADLINES 

TOPUUXANrTEM 

in rfie Daily Plonn#f, 

ilopby Kedzie 116 

and fill out o form 

Of o^ail it to 

by 1 1 a.m two doys 
b«for« it \i to run. 




KANSAS STATE COLIEGIAN 



hwNAGiNG eonot 

JUfRMT 




N»w] t«wtnd (ToJRkIi (^ lop compvi, local, ilata, noHoaal atxl weild nawt from 1^ poft 48 howi Britfi we colkcted 
nofn wirv and staff rvpofli 



Teen-oger convicted in shooting 
gets life sentence in Doctge City 

DODGE CITY. Kon - A ISyeor-old convicted in 
ifie shooting death of o mon and ifie wounding of 
another outstde a muMum wot tentenced lo life in 
prison for the killing 

Rofoet Flor«i, who wot 1 4 at the ttnw of the inci- 
iitr\t, was sentenced WedneKfoy For the deotn of Justin 
Mercodo, 1 8. outside the Boot Hiil Museum in October 
1996. 

Prosecutors said Floras shot into a group oF peopts 
gothefed m ifie parking lot of the downtown museurn 

Police said Flores hod gong ties, but the victims did 
not 

Flores woi also sentenced to on odditionol 34 
months lor shooting John Moses, 19, in Itie abdomen. 
The sentences will run consecutively. 

Flores will serve part of his sentence Sl the Youth 
Center in Topelto until he is at least 16 Me will be eli- 
gible for porole 15 yeors front the lime he enters 
prison 

Fraternity gets harshest penalty 
for scavenger hunt in Indiono 

BLOOM II^TON, Ind - Fear ond ongor spreod 
ocross the India no Universtty compus becouse a fr eter- 
nity piayed a prank thai crossed the line, the deon of 
students said in handing down the fiorihest punishrrvent 
ovoiloble 

The university expelled Zeta Beta Tau on 
Wednesdoy for sending new pledges to search for 22 
items, including photos of a midget, "2 chicks kissing 
I less clothes, more cfedit|' ond 'any funny-bokin' 
Mexicon ' 

The penotty was horsher than thot recommended 
by the untveriity'i Fraternity ond Judicial Boord, which 
hod suggested suspending the histoncolly Jewish fro- 
ternity through Jon 1, 2000, followed by o year of 
probation 

'The oclions of these yourtg n^en generated fear 
and anger," Richard McKaig, dean of students, said 
"Enough is enough " 

The froternity wos earlier suspended by its notional 
heodquortets for the Oct 15 scovenger hunt The 



chapter president hod opologtied ond oiked fellow 
students to give the house another chance. 

The expulsion means the fraternity's sign will be 
token down, and the group will slop functioning as a 
student orgoniiolton Its 1 30 members can continue to 
live in the house, but separate disciplinary ociion could 
Slill be token ogainst those involved in the scovenger 
hunt 

McKoig said the expulsion wot for on indefinite 
period of time 

Blixzard kills up to 20.000 catHe; 
dollar loss in millions for Kansas 

Kansas feed lot operotori cleored deed cottle out af 
their pens Vfednesdoy after a weekend bliziord leh 
thousands dead, many of which suffocated or drowned 
ofler they were bur red m snowdrifts. 

livestock officiols eitimoled that up to 2 percent of 
the stole's cotlfe in feed lots were killed m the storm, 
with dollor losses in the millions 

'II could be up to 20,000 head, ond thot's only ihe 
death toss,' said Kelly loganbilt, a spokes woman for 
the Konsos livestock Aisociotion in Topeko h will be 
harder to put a figure on who! it will cost to recoup 
weight losses suffered by cattle m the storm 

Jomes Earl Ray in hospital ogoin 

NASHVIllE, Tenn - James Eorl Roy fios been hos- 
pitalized lor the eighth time since last December 

Roy, the confessed ossossin of the Rev Martin 
luther King Jr , suffers from cirrhosis of lite liver Fie 
was in fair condition Thursday - upgroded from seri- 
ous - ot Columbia AAemoriol htospiiol, spokeswoman 
Freda Herndon sotd hie entered the hospital 
Wedn